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Asian Long-Horned Beetle

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Géraldine Roux – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fine-scale invasion genetics of the quarantine pest, Anoplophora glabripennis, reconstructed in single outbreaks
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Tetyana Tsykun, Marion Javal, Géraldine Roux, Doris Hölling, Simone Prospero

    Abstract:

    The xylophagous cerambycid Anoplophora glabripennis , the Asian Long-Horned Beetle (ALB), is highly polyphagous and can colonize a wide range of broadleaved host trees causing significant economic damage. For this reason, it is considered a quarantine pest in Europe and North America. Although the global spread of ALB has been depicted recently, no comprehensive studies exist on the genetic pattern of populations’ establishment and dynamics at fine-scale (i.e. within invasive outbreaks), before eradication measures are applied. This information may, however, be particularly important for an efficient management and control of invasive pests. Here, we characterized population genetic diversity and patterns of spread of ALB within and among the four outbreaks detected in Switzerland between 2011 and 2015. For this, we genotyped 223 specimens at 15 nuclear microsatellite loci and conducted specific population-based analyses. Our study shows: (1) At least three independent introductions and a, human-mediated, secondary dispersal event leading to the four outbreaks in the country; (2) An overall low intra-population genetic diversity in the viable and several years active invasive populations; (3) A colonization of single trees by homogeneous ALB genotypes; And (4) an establishment of populations several generations prior to its official discovery.

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  • Correction to: Complex invasion history of the Asian Long-Horned Beetle: fifteen years after first detection in Europe
    Journal of Pest Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marion Javal, Alain Roques, Julien Haran, Franck Herard, Melody A Keena, Géraldine Roux

    Abstract:

    In Table 1, longitude of the population 1 (Tallgrass, Canada) and the associated Figs. 2c and 5c were published incorrectly in the original publication of the article.

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  • complex invasion history of the Asian long horned Beetle fifteen years after first detection in europe
    Journal of Pest Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marion Javal, Géraldine Roux, Alain Roques, Julien Haran, Franck Herard, Melody A Keena

    Abstract:

    The Asian Long-Horned Beetle (ALB), a Cerambycidae, is an urban tree pest native to East Asia accidentally introduced to other continents via solid wood packing material. It was first detected in Europe in 2001, and since then infestations have been found in ten European countries. Using a 485-bp-long fragment of the mitochondrial barcode gene (COI), we studied the genetic diversity and structure of ALB populations in both native and invaded ranges, with a specific focus on Europe. Three main haplotypes were found across the native and invaded distribution of ALB. The native area in Asia was the most diverse with 23 haplotypes, but a low genetic structure was observed. Our results revealed up to nine distinct haplotypes that was diverged by no more than six mutational steps in European populations collected from 2001 to 2016. Nevertheless, the genetic structure was characterized by one widespread dominant haplotype in Europe. The overall complex genetic structure observed in Europe suggested a convoluted invasion scenario. Indeed, invasion history may include several introduction events as well as secondary dispersal.

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Marion Javal – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fine-scale invasion genetics of the quarantine pest, Anoplophora glabripennis, reconstructed in single outbreaks
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Tetyana Tsykun, Marion Javal, Géraldine Roux, Doris Hölling, Simone Prospero

    Abstract:

    The xylophagous cerambycid Anoplophora glabripennis , the Asian Long-Horned Beetle (ALB), is highly polyphagous and can colonize a wide range of broadleaved host trees causing significant economic damage. For this reason, it is considered a quarantine pest in Europe and North America. Although the global spread of ALB has been depicted recently, no comprehensive studies exist on the genetic pattern of populations’ establishment and dynamics at fine-scale (i.e. within invasive outbreaks), before eradication measures are applied. This information may, however, be particularly important for an efficient management and control of invasive pests. Here, we characterized population genetic diversity and patterns of spread of ALB within and among the four outbreaks detected in Switzerland between 2011 and 2015. For this, we genotyped 223 specimens at 15 nuclear microsatellite loci and conducted specific population-based analyses. Our study shows: (1) At least three independent introductions and a, human-mediated, secondary dispersal event leading to the four outbreaks in the country; (2) An overall low intra-population genetic diversity in the viable and several years active invasive populations; (3) A colonization of single trees by homogeneous ALB genotypes; And (4) an establishment of populations several generations prior to its official discovery.

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  • Correction to: Complex invasion history of the Asian Long-Horned Beetle: fifteen years after first detection in Europe
    Journal of Pest Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marion Javal, Alain Roques, Julien Haran, Franck Herard, Melody A Keena, Géraldine Roux

    Abstract:

    In Table 1, longitude of the population 1 (Tallgrass, Canada) and the associated Figs. 2c and 5c were published incorrectly in the original publication of the article.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • complex invasion history of the Asian long horned Beetle fifteen years after first detection in europe
    Journal of Pest Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marion Javal, Géraldine Roux, Alain Roques, Julien Haran, Franck Herard, Melody A Keena

    Abstract:

    The Asian Long-Horned Beetle (ALB), a Cerambycidae, is an urban tree pest native to East Asia accidentally introduced to other continents via solid wood packing material. It was first detected in Europe in 2001, and since then infestations have been found in ten European countries. Using a 485-bp-long fragment of the mitochondrial barcode gene (COI), we studied the genetic diversity and structure of ALB populations in both native and invaded ranges, with a specific focus on Europe. Three main haplotypes were found across the native and invaded distribution of ALB. The native area in Asia was the most diverse with 23 haplotypes, but a low genetic structure was observed. Our results revealed up to nine distinct haplotypes that was diverged by no more than six mutational steps in European populations collected from 2001 to 2016. Nevertheless, the genetic structure was characterized by one widespread dominant haplotype in Europe. The overall complex genetic structure observed in Europe suggested a convoluted invasion scenario. Indeed, invasion history may include several introduction events as well as secondary dispersal.

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Alain Roques – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Correction to: Complex invasion history of the Asian Long-Horned Beetle: fifteen years after first detection in Europe
    Journal of Pest Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marion Javal, Alain Roques, Julien Haran, Franck Herard, Melody A Keena, Géraldine Roux

    Abstract:

    In Table 1, longitude of the population 1 (Tallgrass, Canada) and the associated Figs. 2c and 5c were published incorrectly in the original publication of the article.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • complex invasion history of the Asian long horned Beetle fifteen years after first detection in europe
    Journal of Pest Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marion Javal, Géraldine Roux, Alain Roques, Julien Haran, Franck Herard, Melody A Keena

    Abstract:

    The Asian Long-Horned Beetle (ALB), a Cerambycidae, is an urban tree pest native to East Asia accidentally introduced to other continents via solid wood packing material. It was first detected in Europe in 2001, and since then infestations have been found in ten European countries. Using a 485-bp-long fragment of the mitochondrial barcode gene (COI), we studied the genetic diversity and structure of ALB populations in both native and invaded ranges, with a specific focus on Europe. Three main haplotypes were found across the native and invaded distribution of ALB. The native area in Asia was the most diverse with 23 haplotypes, but a low genetic structure was observed. Our results revealed up to nine distinct haplotypes that was diverged by no more than six mutational steps in European populations collected from 2001 to 2016. Nevertheless, the genetic structure was characterized by one widespread dominant haplotype in Europe. The overall complex genetic structure observed in Europe suggested a convoluted invasion scenario. Indeed, invasion history may include several introduction events as well as secondary dispersal.

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  • Deciphering the worldwide invasion of the Asian long‐horned Beetle: A recurrent invasion process from the native area together with a bridgehead effect
    Molecular Ecology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marion Javal, Alain Roques, Eric Lombaert, Tetyana Tsykun, Claudine Courtin, Carole Kerdelhué, Simone Prospero, Géraldine Roux

    Abstract:

    Retracing introduction routes is crucial for understanding the evolutionary processes involved in an invasion, as well as for highlighting the invasion history of a species at the global scale. The Asian Long-Horned Beetle (ALB) Anoplophora glabripennis is a xylophagous pest native to Asia and invasive in North America and Europe. It is responsible for severe losses of urban trees, in both its native and invaded ranges. Based on historical and genetic data, several hypotheses have been formulated concerning its invasion history, including the possibility of multiple introductions from the native zone and secondary dispersal within the invaded areas, but none have been formally tested. In this study, we characterized the genetic structure of ALB in both its native and invaded ranges using microsatellites. In order to test different invasion scenarios, we used an approximate Bayesian “random forest” algorithm together with traditional population genetics approaches. The strong population differentiation observed in the native area was not geographically structured, suggesting complex migration events that were probably human-mediated. Both native and invasive populations had low genetic diversity, but this characteristic did not prevent the success of the ALB invasions. Our results highlight the complexity of invasion pathways for insect pests. Specifically, our findings indicate that invasive species might be repeatedly introduced from their native range, and they emphasize the importance of multiple, human-mediated introductions in successful invasions. Finally, our results demonstrate that invasive species can spread across continents following a bridgehead path, in which an invasive population may have acted as a source for another invasion.

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