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Asthenopia

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Nam Ju Moon – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • clinical evaluation of accommodation and ocular surface stability relavant to visual Asthenopia with 3d displays
    BMC Ophthalmology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Nam Ju Moon

    Abstract:

    Background
    To validate the association between accommodation and visual Asthenopia by measuring objective accommodative amplitude with the Optical Quality Analysis System (OQAS®, Visiometrics, Terrassa, Spain), and to investigate associations among accommodation, ocular surface instability, and visual Asthenopia while viewing 3D displays.

  • ophthalmological factors influencing visual Asthenopia as a result of viewing 3d displays
    British Journal of Ophthalmology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Nam Ju Moon, Sohee Jeon

    Abstract:

    Aims To identify ophthalmological factors influencing Asthenopia as a result of viewing three-dimensional (3D) displays. Methods Thirty adult subjects without ophthalmological abnormality watched the same 3D displays for 30 min. Each subject9s near point of accommodation (NPA) and convergence (NPC), amplitude of fusional convergence and divergence, stereopsis, tear break-up time and temperature of ocular surface, and angle of phoric deviation were measured before and after viewing the 3D displays. In addition, a survey for subjective symptoms was conducted immediately following the viewing of the 3D displays. The above mentioned experiments were performed equally with two-dimensional (2D) displays in the same 30 subjects for detection of innate influence of 3D displays. Results The NPA and NPC in the subjects were significantly altered after watching the 3D displays (p Conclusions Accommodation and binocular vergence are predominant ophthalmological factors that may influence Asthenopia significantly following the viewing of 3D displays. Subjective visual discomfort also significantly increased following the viewing of 3D displays. And there is the need for more detailed evaluation for detecting the practically related factors with Asthenopia.

  • P3-1: Ophthalmologic Factors Influencing Asthenopia with Watching 3D Displays
    I-perception, 2012
    Co-Authors: Nam Ju Moon

    Abstract:

    Purpose: To identify ophthalmologic factors influencing Asthenopia while watching 3D displays. Methods: 30 adult subjects without ophthalmologic abnormality watched the same 3D displays for 30 minutes. Each subject’s far and near visual acuity, near points of accommodation and convergence, amplitude of fusional convergence and divergence, stereopsis, angle of phoric deviation, tear break-up time, and temperature of ocular surface before and after watching 3D displays were measured. And surveys for subjective symptoms right after watching 3D displays were conducted. The above-mentioned experiments were performed equally with 2D displays for detection of innate influence of 3D displays. Results: The near points of accommodation and convergence were significantly changed after watching 3D displays (p < .05) compared to 2D displays. And all 10 subjective symptoms were significantly increased after watching 3D displays (p < .05). Conclusion: The accommodation and binocular vergence are predominant ophthalmologic factors that might influence Asthenopia significantly while watching 3D displays. Subjective visual discomfort significantly increases with watching 3D displays, and more specific evaluation should be added for detecting the practically related factors with Asthenopia

Sohee Jeon – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ophthalmological factors influencing visual Asthenopia as a result of viewing 3d displays
    British Journal of Ophthalmology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Nam Ju Moon, Sohee Jeon

    Abstract:

    Aims To identify ophthalmological factors influencing Asthenopia as a result of viewing three-dimensional (3D) displays. Methods Thirty adult subjects without ophthalmological abnormality watched the same 3D displays for 30 min. Each subject9s near point of accommodation (NPA) and convergence (NPC), amplitude of fusional convergence and divergence, stereopsis, tear break-up time and temperature of ocular surface, and angle of phoric deviation were measured before and after viewing the 3D displays. In addition, a survey for subjective symptoms was conducted immediately following the viewing of the 3D displays. The above mentioned experiments were performed equally with two-dimensional (2D) displays in the same 30 subjects for detection of innate influence of 3D displays. Results The NPA and NPC in the subjects were significantly altered after watching the 3D displays (p Conclusions Accommodation and binocular vergence are predominant ophthalmological factors that may influence Asthenopia significantly following the viewing of 3D displays. Subjective visual discomfort also significantly increased following the viewing of 3D displays. And there is the need for more detailed evaluation for detecting the practically related factors with Asthenopia.

M Jimenezvillarruel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • risk factors for Asthenopia among computer terminal operators
    Salud Publica De Mexico, 1996
    Co-Authors: Francisco Raul Sanchezroman, C Perezlucio, C Juarezruiz, Nadia Mayola Velezzamora, M Jimenezvillarruel

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence of Asthenopia among computer terminal operators as compared to unexposed administrative workers and to identify the risk factors associated with this condition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A sample of 35 computer terminal operators and 70 unexposed administrative workers from eight computing centers at an educational institution were included in the study. The risk factors studied were: lighting, contrast, type of lighting, screen type, electrostatic field, eye to monitor distance, time and number of hours worked, age, use of corrective lenses, seniority and overtime. Asthenopia was clinically identified as the presence of at least one sign and symptom present in a given workday. RESULTS: Asthenopia was found in 68.5% of the exposed group and in 47.7% of the unexposed group (p < 0.05). Among the risk factors studied, working for more than four hours at the video display terminal was shown to have a significant association with Asthenopia (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A recommendation is made to take breaks during the workday at computer terminals in order to avoid visual fatigue. Also, more extensive studies should be carried out in our population to establish safety criteria and to standardize work activities using computer terminals.