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Astronomers

The Experts below are selected from a list of 327 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Issei Fujishiro – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • aflak: Visual programming environment enabling end-to-end provenance management for the analysis of astronomical datasets
    Visual Informatics, 2019
    Co-Authors: Malik Olivier Boussejra, Rikuo Uchiki, Yuriko Takeshima, Kazuya Matsubayashi, Shunya Takekawa, Makoto Uemura, Issei Fujishiro

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper describes an extendable graphical framework, aflak , which provides a visualization and provenance management environment for the analysis of multi-spectral astronomical datasets. Via its node editor interface, aflak allows the astronomer to compose transforms on input datasets queryable from public astronomical data repositories, then to export the results of the analysis as Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) files, in a manner such that the full provenance of the output data be preserved and reviewable, and that the exported file be usable by other common astronomical analysis software. FITS is the standard of data interchange in astronomy. By embedding aflak ’s provenance data into FITS files, we both achieve interoperability with existing software and full reproducibility of the process by which Astronomers make discoveries.

  • aflak: Pluggable Visual Programming Environment with Quick Feedback Loop Tuned for Multi-Spectral Astrophysical Observations
    2018 IEEE Scientific Visualization Conference (SciVis), 2018
    Co-Authors: Malik Olivier Boussejra, Rikuo Uchiki, Yuriko Takeshima, Kazuya Matsubayashi, Shunya Takekawa, Makoto Uemura, Issei Fujishiro

    Abstract:

    With the improvements of telescopes and proliferation of sky surveys, there is always more astrophysical data to analyze, but not so many Astronomers. We present aflak, a visualization environment to analyze astronomical datasets. This paper’s contribution lies in that we leverage visual programming techniques to conduct fine-grained astronomical transformations, filtering and visual analyses on multi-spectral datasets, with the possibility for Astronomers to interactively fine-tune all the interacting parameters. As the visual program is gradually designed, the computed results can be visualized in real time, thus aflak puts the astronomer in the loop, while managing data provenance at the same time.

  • TimeTubes: Automatic Extraction of Observable Blazar Features from Long-Term, Multi-Dimensional Datasets
    2018 IEEE Scientific Visualization Conference (SciVis), 2018
    Co-Authors: Naoko Sawada, Makoto Uemura, Masanori Nakayama, Issei Fujishiro

    Abstract:

    Blazars are attractive objects for Astronomers to observe in order to demystify the relativistic jet. Astronomers need to classify characteristic temporal variation patterns and correlations of multidimensional time-dependent observed blazar datasets. Our visualization scheme, called TimeTubes, allows them to easily explore and analyze such datasets geometrically as a 3D volumetric tube. Even with TimeTubes, however, data analysis over such long-term datasets costs them so much labor and may cause a biased analysis. This paper, therefore, attempts to incorporate into the current prototype of TimeTubes, a new functionality: feature extraction, which supports Astronomers‘ efficient data analysis by automatically extracting characteristic spatiotemporal subspaces.

T S Metcalfe – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the production rate and employment of ph d Astronomers
    Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 2008
    Co-Authors: T S Metcalfe

    Abstract:

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, Astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. Astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

Michael J. West – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Public perception of Astronomers Revered, reviled and ridiculed
    Iau Symposia, 2011
    Co-Authors: Michael J. West

    Abstract:

    Society’s view of Astronomers has changed over time and from culture to culture. This review discusses some of the many ways that Astronomers have been perceived by their societies and suggests ways that Astronomers can inuence public perception of ourselves and our profession in the future. 1. Why does public perception of Astronomers matter? \The greatest present need of astronomy, the grandest science, is not more big tele- scopes and big observatories, but a more favorable public opinion.” This sentiment, from a letter written in 1916 to Popular Astronomy magazine, is as relevant today as it was nearly a century ago. Our ancestors observed the heavens for religious and secular reasons, with astronomy and astrology largely indistinguishable. Observations of stars, planets and constellations were used to create calendars that provided agricultural societies with valuable informa- tion for the seasonal planting and harvesting of crops, as well as to predict future events or to discern divine messages from the cosmos. Given the importance of such activities to the cultural identity and even physical survival of ancient people, it is not surprising that sky watchers had prominent roles in their societies. An abundance of archaeological evidence from around the world attests to the importance of the ancient astronomer. In modern times, however, public perception of Astronomers began to change as as- tronomy evolved from an applied to a pure science. With less prominent roles in their societies, Astronomers were forced to seek new forms of nancial support for their schol- arly activities from governments or wealthy benefactors and to justify their continued value to their fellow citizens. Although we live today in a time of remarkable astronomical discoveries, as many politicians and businesses know the public’s collective memory can be short, and hence Astronomers cannot aord to be complacent about our public image.

  • Public Perception of Astronomers: Revered, Reviled and Ridiculed
    arXiv: Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Michael J. West

    Abstract:

    Society’s view of Astronomers has changed over time and from culture to culture. This review discusses some of the many ways that Astronomers have been perceived by their societies and suggests ways that Astronomers can influence public perception of ourselves and our profession in the future.