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William C. Meyers – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • editorial commentary core muscle injuries or Athletic Pubalgia finally the real sausage not just the same ole baloney
    Arthroscopy, 2017
    Co-Authors: William C. Meyers

    Abstract:

    In their paper “Prevalence of Surgical Repair for Athletic Pubalgia and Impact on Performance in Football Athletes Participating in the National Football League Combine,” Knapik et al. cut through the baloney in the literature on “sports hernia” and apply new eyes to the impact of the results of core muscle surgery on young elite athletes trying out for the National Football League (NFL). They found that the players who had surgery did just as well as all the others in and following NFL Combines. Even the players with presumptively residual, MRI findings did well. The paper is superb and identifies, in subtle ways, the importance of magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the role of experience in diagnosing and handling these injuries. The paper is a case control series that extracts tremendous beneficial information for sports physicians, Athletic trainers, management, agents, players, and all of us Sunday afternoon, TV-watching football experts.

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  • Editorial Commentary: Core Muscle Injuries or Athletic Pubalgia—Finally the Real Sausage, Not Just the Same Ole Baloney
    Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery, 2017
    Co-Authors: William C. Meyers

    Abstract:

    In their paper “Prevalence of Surgical Repair for Athletic Pubalgia and Impact on Performance in Football Athletes Participating in the National Football League Combine,” Knapik et al. cut through the baloney in the literature on “sports hernia” and apply new eyes to the impact of the results of core muscle surgery on young elite athletes trying out for the National Football League (NFL). They found that the players who had surgery did just as well as all the others in and following NFL Combines. Even the players with presumptively residual, MRI findings did well. The paper is superb and identifies, in subtle ways, the importance of magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the role of experience in diagnosing and handling these injuries. The paper is a case control series that extracts tremendous beneficial information for sports physicians, Athletic trainers, management, agents, players, and all of us Sunday afternoon, TV-watching football experts.

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  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Athletic Pubalgia and the Sports Hernia: Current Understanding and Practice
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics of North America, 2013
    Co-Authors: Waseem Khan, Adam C Zoga, William C. Meyers

    Abstract:

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard imaging modality for activity-related groin pain. Lesions, including rectus abdominis/adductor aponeurosis injury and osteitis pubis, can be accurately identified and delineated in patients with clinical conditions termed Athletic Pubalgia, core injury, and sports hernia. A dedicated noncontrast Athletic Pubalgia MRI protocol is easy to implement and should be available at musculoskeletal MR imaging centers. This article will review pubic anatomy, imaging considerations, specific lesions, and common MRI findings encountered in the setting of musculoskeletal groin pain.

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Hannu Paajanen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effect of pubic bone marrow edema on recovery from endoscopic surgery for Athletic Pubalgia
    Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 2015
    Co-Authors: L Kuikka, H Hermunen, Hannu Paajanen

    Abstract:

    Athletic Pubalgia (sportsman’s hernia) is often repaired by surgery. The presence of pubic bone marrow edema (BME) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may effect on the outcome of surgery. Surgical treatment of 30 patients with Athletic Pubalgia was performed by placement of totally extraperitoneal endoscopic mesh behind the painful groin area. The presence of pre-operative BME was graded from 0 to 3 using MRI and correlated to post-operative pain scores and recovery to sports activity 2 years after operation. The operated athletes participated in our previous prospective randomized study. The athletes with (n = 21) or without (n = 9) pubic BME had similar patients’ characteristics and pain scores before surgery. Periostic and intraosseous edema at symphysis pubis was related to increase of post-operative pain scores only at 3 months after surgery (P = 0.03) but not to long-term recovery. Two years after surgery, three athletes in the BME group and three in the normal MRI group needed occasionally pain medication for chronic groin pain, and 87% were playing at the same level as before surgery. This study indicates that the presence of pubic BME had no remarkable long-term effect on recovery from endoscopic surgical treatment of Athletic Pubalgia.

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  • Surgical Treatment of Sports Hernia: Laparoscopic Approach
    Sports Hernia and Athletic Pubalgia, 2014
    Co-Authors: Hannu Paajanen, Agneta Montgomery

    Abstract:

    Sports hernia (SH) is a weakness of the posterior wall of the inguinal canal causing groin pain commonly seen in active sports persons. The prevalence in physically active adults is between 5 and 10 %. Sports hernia, in a wider perspective also named Athletic Pubalgia, has multiple etiological factors. Surgical approach includes various open techniques (with or without mesh) or laparoscopic transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) or total extraperitoneal (TEP) techniques with a mesh behind the injured groin. The results of operative treatment from single centers are reported to be good to excellent in between 70 and 90 % of patients. TEP and TAPP are minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of SH. Athletes recover quickly and return to sports early. There are few randomized controlled trials in this field with no single surgical technique exhibiting any significant advantage over the other. In this chapter, we review shortly the pathophysiology, diagnostic difficulties, and treatment using the laparoscopic/endoscopic approach of SH and the associated Athletic Pubalgia.

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  • laparoscopic surgery for chronic groin pain in athletes is more effective than nonoperative treatment a randomized clinical trial with magnetic resonance imaging of 60 patients with sportsman s hernia Athletic Pubalgia
    Surgery, 2011
    Co-Authors: Hannu Paajanen, H Hermunen, Tuomas Brinck, Ilari Airo

    Abstract:

    Background Chronic groin pain in athletes presents often a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Sportsman’s hernia (also called “Athletic Pubalgia”) is a deficiency of the posterior wall of the inguinal canal, which is often repaired by laparoscopic mesh placement. Endoscopic mesh repair may offer a faster recovery for athletes with sportsman’s hernia than nonoperative therapy. Methods A randomized, prospective study was conducted on 60 patients with a diagnosis of chronic groin pain and suspected sportsman’s hernia. Clinical data and MRI were collected on all patients. After 3 to 6 months of groin symptoms, the patients were randomized into an operative or a physiotherapy group (n = 30 patients in each group). Operation was performed using a totally extraperitoneal repair in which mesh was placed behind the symphysis and painful groin area. Conservative treatment included at least 2 months of active physiotherapy, including corticosteroid injections and oral anti-inflammatory analgesics. The outcome measures were pre- and postoperative pain using a visual analogue scale and partial or full recovery to sports activity at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. Results The athletes in both treatment groups had similar characteristics and pain scores. Operative repair was more effective than nonoperative treatment to decrease chronic groin pain after 1 month and up to 12 months of follow-up (P Conclusion This randomized controlled study indicated that the endoscopic placement of retropubic mesh was more efficient than conservative therapy for the treatment of sportsman’s hernia (Athletic Pubalgia).

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Adam C Zoga – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Athletic Pubalgia and Core Muscle Injury.
    Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2015
    Co-Authors: Dana J. Coker, Adam C Zoga

    Abstract:

    AbstractMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard of care imaging modality for a difficult, often misunderstood spectrum of musculoskeletal injury termed Athletic Pubalgia or core muscle injury. Armed with a dedicated noncontrast Athletic Pubalgia protocol and a late model phased arra

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  • Imaging of Athletic Pubalgia and core muscle injuries: clinical and therapeutic correlations.
    Clinics in Sports Medicine, 2013
    Co-Authors: Andrew Palisch, Adam C Zoga, William C. Meyers

    Abstract:

    Athletes frequently injure their hips and core muscles. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of groin pain in the athlete can be tricky, frequently posing vexing problem for trainers and physicians. Clinical presentations of the various hip problems overlap with respect to history and physical examination. This article reviews clinical presentations and magnetic resonance imaging findings specific to the various causes of groin pain in the athlete. The focus is on the core muscle injuries (Athletic Pubalgia or “sports hernia”). The goal is to raise awareness about the variety of injuries that occur and therapeutic options.

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  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Athletic Pubalgia and the Sports Hernia: Current Understanding and Practice
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics of North America, 2013
    Co-Authors: Waseem Khan, Adam C Zoga, William C. Meyers

    Abstract:

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the standard imaging modality for activity-related groin pain. Lesions, including rectus abdominis/adductor aponeurosis injury and osteitis pubis, can be accurately identified and delineated in patients with clinical conditions termed Athletic Pubalgia, core injury, and sports hernia. A dedicated noncontrast Athletic Pubalgia MRI protocol is easy to implement and should be available at musculoskeletal MR imaging centers. This article will review pubic anatomy, imaging considerations, specific lesions, and common MRI findings encountered in the setting of musculoskeletal groin pain.

    Free Register to Access Article