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Atmospheric Science

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Brigitte Baeuerle – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A 20-year history of NSF-supported Atmospheric Science field campaigns: Statistics and demographics
    Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 2017
    Co-Authors: Brigitte Baeuerle

    Abstract:

    Over the past two decades, the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) has funded nearly 200 Atmospheric Science-related field campaigns that have included deployment of AGS-sponsored observing facilities. These projects have spanned the range from modest, single investigator experiments to massive, multi-investigator, multi-agency campaigns. They have occurred both domestically and abroad, on every continent and over most oceans. In this article, we present an analysis of some of the details about these campaigns, including such elements as deployment location and cost of the campaign, and of statistics related to the principal investigators (for example, type and location of institution, gender, years since degree). In addition, we assess trends in field campaign cost. These results provide a retrospective view of Atmospheric Science field work that has been supported since 1992.

Sonia Lashertrapp – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a successful introduction of authentic research early in an undergraduate Atmospheric Science program
    Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 2012
    Co-Authors: Kathleen Quardokus, Sonia Lashertrapp, Eric M Riggs

    Abstract:

    Participating in scientific research as an undergraduate student provides an opportunity to increase understanding of how scientific knowledge is advanced, to learn new research tools, to develop the ability to critically analyze new ideas, and to practice disseminating scientific findings. This experience unfortunately has traditionally been limited to students that can participate in select programs (e.g., summer research experiences, undergraduate positions in a faculty member’s research group, special topics courses, independent study, or internships). A new laboratory course has been developed to provide sophomore- level Atmospheric Science students with the opportunity to participate in an authentic research project within the structure of an academic semester. The course consists of two modules based upon research topics currently under investigation by faculty (here, specific problems in cloud microphysics and severe weather research). Students participate in learning activities, work as a researc…

  • ideas about the nature of Science held by undergraduate Atmospheric Science students
    Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 2008
    Co-Authors: Loran Carleton Parker, Gerald H Krockover, Sonia Lashertrapp, David C Eichinger

    Abstract:

    Learning about the nature of Science involves learning about Science, its goals, methods, products, and practitioners. As university students progress through their studies, what are they learning about Science? Several studies have attempted to answer this question, but none have examined the ideas of Atmospheric Science students. We discuss the results of a single study that explores introductory undergraduate Atmospheric Science students’ ideas about the nature of Science, and examines relationships between these ideas and students’ previous university Science coursework. We focus on the ideas about the definition of Science, about scientific knowledge, about the scientific process, and about the scientific enterprise held by a group of undergraduate Atmospheric Science students. Unlike previous university students studied, the majority of these students viewed Science as an enterprise that requires creativity and imagination. They also believed Science to be a discipline that “proves” its assertions b…

David C Eichinger – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ideas about the nature of Science held by undergraduate Atmospheric Science students
    Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 2008
    Co-Authors: Loran Carleton Parker, Gerald H Krockover, Sonia Lashertrapp, David C Eichinger

    Abstract:

    Learning about the nature of Science involves learning about Science, its goals, methods, products, and practitioners. As university students progress through their studies, what are they learning about Science? Several studies have attempted to answer this question, but none have examined the ideas of Atmospheric Science students. We discuss the results of a single study that explores introductory undergraduate Atmospheric Science students’ ideas about the nature of Science, and examines relationships between these ideas and students’ previous university Science coursework. We focus on the ideas about the definition of Science, about scientific knowledge, about the scientific process, and about the scientific enterprise held by a group of undergraduate Atmospheric Science students. Unlike previous university students studied, the majority of these students viewed Science as an enterprise that requires creativity and imagination. They also believed Science to be a discipline that “proves” its assertions b…