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Atomic Hydrogen

The Experts below are selected from a list of 237 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Akira Heya – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Reduction and Etching of Si-Rich SiOx Film by Atomic Hydrogen Annealing
    2019 26th International Workshop on Active-Matrix Flatpanel Displays and Devices (AM-FPD), 2019
    Co-Authors: Akira Heya

    Abstract:

    To clarify the influence of Atomic Hydrogen on various materials is required for realization of a sustainable society using Hydrogen energy. The influence of Atomic Hydrogen was investigated from the reaction of Si-rich SiOx film on a Si wafer using Atomic Hydrogen annealing (AHA). In AHA, the high-density Atomic Hydrogen is generated on a heated tungsten surface by catalytic cracking reaction. The Si-rich SiOx film was reduced by AHA. The Si-rich SiOx film was etched with an etching rate of 1.0 nm/min. It is considered that the chemical reactions of reduction and etching are originated from disordered bond network due to Si rich region. The Si-rich SiOx film is expected to be used as an Atomic Hydrogen sensor.

  • Reduction and Etching of Si-Rich SiO x Film by Atomic Hydrogen Annealing
    2019 26th International Workshop on Active-Matrix Flatpanel Displays and Devices (AM-FPD), 2019
    Co-Authors: Akira Heya

    Abstract:

    To clarify the influence of Atomic Hydrogen on various materials is required for realization of a sustainable society using Hydrogen energy. The influence of Atomic Hydrogen was investigated from the reaction of Si-rich SiO x film on a Si wafer using Atomic Hydrogen annealing (AHA). In AHA, the high-density Atomic Hydrogen is generated on a heated tungsten surface by catalytic cracking reaction. The Si-rich SiO x film was reduced by AHA. The Si-rich SiO x film was etched with an etching rate of 1.0 nm/min. It is considered that the chemical reactions of reduction and etching are originated from disordered bond network due to Si rich region. The Si-rich SiO x film is expected to be used as an Atomic Hydrogen sensor.

  • Reduction of graphene oxide by Atomic Hydrogen annealing
    2016 23rd International Workshop on Active-Matrix Flatpanel Displays and Devices (AM-FPD), 2016
    Co-Authors: Akira Heya, Naoto Matsuo

    Abstract:

    Effect of Atomic Hydrogen annealing (AHA) on graphene oxide (GO) was investigated. In AHA, the high-density Atomic Hydrogen is generated on heated tungsten (W) surface by catalytic cracking reaction. From X-ray photoelectron spectra, GO films were reduced by AHA. The sheet resistance of the GO film was decreased by 5 orders of magnitude at W mesh temperature of 1780 °C, sample temperature of 220 °C and treatment time of 1800 s. The reduction of GO films relates chemical reaction due to Atomic Hydrogen because the GO films was not reduced by He treatment. The C-O-C bonds in GO films were preferentially reduced by AHA.

J. T. Yates – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Reflector Atomic Hydrogen source: A method for producing pure Atomic Hydrogen in ultrahigh vacuum
    Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology, 1993
    Co-Authors: K. H. Bornscheuer, S. R. Lucas, Wolfgang J. Choyke, W. D. Partlow, J. T. Yates

    Abstract:

    A tungsten filament Atomic Hydrogen source placed in an effusive H2 molecular beam has been combined with a cryogenically cooled Pyrex reflector. This arrangement permits efficient production and transfer of Atomic Hydrogen to a sample surface by a non‐line‐of‐sight route. The arrangement eliminates most radiation heating of the sample. With the beam source, high local H2 gas densities and Atomic Hydrogen production rates in the filament region may be achieved without producing excessive gas loads in an ultrahigh vacuum system. A silicon(100) crystal sample was used in this study. The indirect source protects the sample from possible metal contamination evolving from the hot tungsten filament, and efficiently delivers only Atomic and molecular Hydrogen species to the sample. The efficiency of this arrangement has been quantitatively compared to a line‐of‐sight filament source of Atomic Hydrogen.

  • Inhibition of Atomic Hydrogen Etching of Si(111)
    , 1991
    Co-Authors: P. J. Chen, M. L. Colaianni, J. T. Yates

    Abstract:

    Abstract : Subsurface boron doping reconstructs the Si(111) surface and alters the electronic character of the surface Si atoms. The interaction of Atomic Hydrogen with the boron-modified Si(111) – (V3xV3) – R30 surface was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). In comparison to the Si(111) – (7×7) surface, we observe a significantly reduced Hydrogen saturation coverage, measured by TPD and HREELS, and the absence of silane production. The ordered (1/3 ML) subsurface boron atoms passivate the surface Si atoms and reduce their reactivity with Atomic Hydrogen. This leads to a surface condition causing suppression of silicon etching by Atomic Hydrogen, compared to the unmodified Si(111) – (7×7) surface.

Naoto Matsuo – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Reduction of graphene oxide by Atomic Hydrogen annealing
    2016 23rd International Workshop on Active-Matrix Flatpanel Displays and Devices (AM-FPD), 2016
    Co-Authors: Akira Heya, Naoto Matsuo

    Abstract:

    Effect of Atomic Hydrogen annealing (AHA) on graphene oxide (GO) was investigated. In AHA, the high-density Atomic Hydrogen is generated on heated tungsten (W) surface by catalytic cracking reaction. From X-ray photoelectron spectra, GO films were reduced by AHA. The sheet resistance of the GO film was decreased by 5 orders of magnitude at W mesh temperature of 1780 °C, sample temperature of 220 °C and treatment time of 1800 s. The reduction of GO films relates chemical reaction due to Atomic Hydrogen because the GO films was not reduced by He treatment. The C-O-C bonds in GO films were preferentially reduced by AHA.

  • Surface Modification of Plastic Substrates Using Atomic Hydrogen
    Journal of The Vacuum Society of Japan, 2008
    Co-Authors: Akira Heya, Naoto Matsuo

    Abstract:

    The surface properties of a plastic substrate were changed by a novel surface treatment called Atomic Hydrogen annealing (AHA). In this method, a plastic substrate was exposed to Atomic Hydrogen generated by cracking of Hydrogen molecules on heated tungsten wire. Surface roughness was increased and halogen elements (F and Cl) were selectively etched by AHA. In addition, plastic surface was reduced by AHA. The surface can be modified by the recombination reaction of Atomic Hydrogen, the reduction reaction and selective etching of halogen atom. It is concluded that this method is a promising technique for improvement of adhesion between inorganic films and plastic substrates at low temperatures.