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ATP8B1

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Coen C. Paulusma – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the phospholipid flippase ATP8B1 mediates apical localization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 2016
    Co-Authors: Vincent A Van Der Mark, Ronald Oude P J Elferink, Suzanne Duijst, Kam S Homok, Hugo R De Jonge, Jungchin Chang, Dragana Vidovic, Marianne Carlon, Coen C. Paulusma

    Abstract:

    Abstract Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the phospholipid flippase ATP8B1. Apart from severe cholestatic liver disease, many PFIC1 patients develop extrahepatic symptoms characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), such as pulmonary infection, sweat gland dysfunction and failure to thrive. CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel essential for epithelial fluid transport. Previously it was shown that CFTR transcript levels were strongly reduced in livers of PFIC1 patients. Here we have investigated the hypothesis that ATP8B1 is important for proper CFTR expression and function. We analyzed CFTR expression in ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines and assessed CFTR function by measuring short-circuit currents across transwell-grown ATP8B1-depleted intestinal T84 cells and by a genetically-encoded fluorescent chloride sensor. In addition, we studied CFTR surface expression upon induction of CFTR transcription. We show that CFTR protein levels are strongly reduced in the apical membrane of human ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines, a phenotype that coincided with reduced CFTR activity. Apical membrane insertion upon induction of ectopically-expressed CFTR was strongly impaired in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We conclude that ATP8B1 is essential for correct apical localization of CFTR in human intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cells, and that impaired CFTR localization underlies some of the extrahepatic phenotypes observed in ATP8B1 deficiency.

  • rescue of defective ATP8B1 trafficking by cftr correctors as a therapeutic strategy for familial intrahepatic cholestasis
    Journal of Hepatology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Wendy L. Van Der Woerd, Catharina G.k. Wichers, Roderick H.j. Houwen, Coen C. Paulusma, Anna L Vestergaard, Jens Peter Andersen, Stan F. J. Van De Graaf

    Abstract:

    Background & Aims ATP8B1 deficiency is an autosomal recessive liver disease characterized by intrahepatic cholestasis. ATP8B1 mutation p.I661T, the most frequent mutation in European patients, results in protein misfolding and impaired targeting to the plasma membrane. Similarly, mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR ), associated with cystic fibrosis, impair protein folding and trafficking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether compounds that rescue CFTR F508del trafficking are capable of improving p.I661T-ATP8B1 plasma membrane expression. Methods The effect of CFTR corrector compounds on plasma membrane expression of p.I661T-ATP8B1 was evaluated by cell surface biotinylation and immunofluorescence. ATPase activity was evaluated of a purified analogue protein carrying a mutation at the matching position (p.L622T-ATP8A2). Results The clinically used compounds, 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) improved p.I661T-ATP8B1 plasma membrane targeting. Compounds C4, C5, C13 and C17 also significantly increased plasma membrane expression of p.I661T-ATP8B1. SAHA and compound C17 upregulated ATP8B1 transcription. p.I661T-ATP8B1 was partly targeted to the canalicular membrane in polarized cells, which became more evident upon treatment with SAHA and/or C4. p.L622T-ATP8A2 showed phospholipid-induced ATPase activity, suggesting that mutations at a matching position in ATP8B1 do not block functionality. Combination therapy of SAHA and compound C4 resulted in an additional improvement of ATP8B1 cell surface abundance. Conclusions This study shows that several CFTR correctors can improve trafficking of p.I661T-ATP8B1 to the plasma membrane in vitro . Hence, these compounds may be suitable to be part of a future therapy for ATP8B1 deficiency and other genetic disorders associated with protein misfolding. Lay Summary Compounds that improve the cellular machinery dealing with protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and allow for proper folding of proteins with (mild) missense mutations are called proteostasis regulators (Balch, Science 2008). Such compounds are potentially of high therapeutic value for many (liver) diseases. In this manuscript, we investigated whether compounds identified in screens as CFTR folding correctors are actually proteostasis regulators and thus have a broader application in other protein folding diseases. Using these compounds, we could indeed show improved trafficking to the (apical) plasma membrane of a mutated ATP8B1 protein, carrying the p.I661T missense mutation. This is the most frequently identified mutation in this rare cholestatic disorder. Importantly, ATP8B1 shows no similarity to CFTR. These data are important in providing support for the concept that rare, genetic liver diseases can potentially be treated using a generalized strategy.

  • ATP8B1 mediated spatial organization of cdc42 signaling maintains singularity during enterocyte polarization
    Journal of Cell Biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lucas J M Bruurs, Stan F. J. Van De Graaf, A S Knisely, Lisa Donker, Susan Zwakenberg, Fried J T Zwartkruis, Harry Begthel, George Posthuma, Coen C. Paulusma

    Abstract:

    During yeast cell polarization localization of the small GTPase, cell division control protein 42 homologue (Cdc42) is clustered to ensure the formation of a single bud. Here we show that the disease-associated flippase ATPase class I type 8b member 1 (ATP8B1) enables Cdc42 clustering during enterocyte polarization. Loss of this regulation results in increased apical membrane size with scattered apical recycling endosomes and permits the formation of more than one apical domain, resembling the singularity defect observed in yeast. Mechanistically, we show that to become apically clustered, Cdc42 requires the interaction between its polybasic region and negatively charged membrane lipids provided by ATP8B1. Disturbing this interaction, either by ATP8B1 depletion or by introduction of a Cdc42 mutant defective in lipid binding, increases Cdc42 mobility and results in apical membrane enlargement. Re-establishing Cdc42 clustering, by tethering it to the apical membrane or lowering its diffusion, restores normal apical membrane size in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We therefore conclude that singularity regulation by Cdc42 is conserved between yeast and human and that this regulation is required to maintain healthy tissue architecture.

Ronald Oude P J Elferink – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the phospholipid flippase ATP8B1 mediates apical localization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 2016
    Co-Authors: Vincent A Van Der Mark, Ronald Oude P J Elferink, Suzanne Duijst, Kam S Homok, Hugo R De Jonge, Jungchin Chang, Dragana Vidovic, Marianne Carlon, Coen C. Paulusma

    Abstract:

    Abstract Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the phospholipid flippase ATP8B1. Apart from severe cholestatic liver disease, many PFIC1 patients develop extrahepatic symptoms characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), such as pulmonary infection, sweat gland dysfunction and failure to thrive. CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel essential for epithelial fluid transport. Previously it was shown that CFTR transcript levels were strongly reduced in livers of PFIC1 patients. Here we have investigated the hypothesis that ATP8B1 is important for proper CFTR expression and function. We analyzed CFTR expression in ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines and assessed CFTR function by measuring short-circuit currents across transwell-grown ATP8B1-depleted intestinal T84 cells and by a genetically-encoded fluorescent chloride sensor. In addition, we studied CFTR surface expression upon induction of CFTR transcription. We show that CFTR protein levels are strongly reduced in the apical membrane of human ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines, a phenotype that coincided with reduced CFTR activity. Apical membrane insertion upon induction of ectopically-expressed CFTR was strongly impaired in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We conclude that ATP8B1 is essential for correct apical localization of CFTR in human intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cells, and that impaired CFTR localization underlies some of the extrahepatic phenotypes observed in ATP8B1 deficiency.

  • ATP8B1 and atp11c two lipid flippases important for hepatocyte function
    Digestive Diseases, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jyoti Naik, Ronald Oude P J Elferink, Suzanne Duijst, Dirk R De Waart, Karina Utsunomiya, Piter J Bosma, Coen C. Paulusma

    Abstract:

    P4 ATPases are lipid flippases and transport phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytosolic leaflet of biological membranes. Lipid flipping is important for the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Recently it was shown that loss of the P4 ATPases ATP8B1 and ATP11C are associated with severe Cholestatic liver disease. Mutation of ATP8B1 cause progressive familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1)and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (BRIC 1). From our observations we hypothesized that ATP8B1 deficiency causes a phospholipids randomization at the canalicular membrane, which results in extraction of cholesterol due to increase sensitivity of the canalicular membrane. Deficiency of ATP11C causes conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. In our preliminary result we observed accumulation of unconjugated bile salts in Atp11c deficient mice probably because of regulation in the expression or function of OATP1B2. Similar to ATP8B1, ATP11C have regulation on membrane transporters.

  • the lipid flippase heterodimer ATP8B1 cdc50a is essential for surface expression of the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter slc10a2 asbt in intestinal caco 2 cells
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 2014
    Co-Authors: Vincent A Van Der Mark, Ronald Oude P J Elferink, A S Knisely, Kam S Homok, Rudi D De Waart, Merit M Tabbers, Heleen W Voogt, Coen C. Paulusma

    Abstract:

    Abstract Deficiency of the phospholipid flippase ATPase, aminophospholipid transporter, class I, type 8B, member 1 (ATP8B1) causes progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (BRIC1). Apart from cholestasis, many patients also suffer from diarrhea of yet unknown etiology. Here we have studied the hypothesis that intestinal ATP8B1 deficiency results in bile salt malabsorption as a possible cause of PFIC1/BRIC1 diarrhea. Bile salt transport was studied in ATP8B1-depleted intestinal Caco-2 cells. Apical membrane localization was studied by a biotinylation approach. Fecal bile salt and electrolyte contents were analyzed in stool samples of PFIC1 patients, of whom some had undergone biliary diversion or liver transplantation. Bile salt uptake by the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter solute carrier family 10 (sodium/bile acid cotransporter), member 2 (SLC10A2) was strongly impaired in ATP8B1-depleted Caco-2 cells. The reduced SLC10A2 activity coincided with strongly reduced apical membrane localization, which was caused by impaired apical membrane insertion of SLC10A2. Moreover, we show that endogenous ATP8B1 exists in a functional heterodimer with transmembrane protein 30A (CDC50A) in Caco-2 cells. Analyses of stool samples of post-transplant PFIC1 patients demonstrated that bile salt content was not changed, whereas sodium and chloride concentrations were elevated and potassium levels were decreased. The ATP8B1–CDC50A heterodimer is essential for the apical localization of SLC10A2 in Caco-2 cells. Diarrhea in PFIC1/BRIC1 patients has a secretory origin to which SLC10A2 deficiency may contribute. This results in elevated luminal bile salt concentrations and consequent enhanced electrolyte secretion and/or reduced electrolyte resorption.

A S Knisely – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • an expanded role for heterozygous mutations of abcb4 abcb11 ATP8B1 abcc2 and tjp2 in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy
    Scientific Reports, 2017
    Co-Authors: Peter H Dixon, A S Knisely, Richard Thompson, Melissa Sambrotta, Jennifer Chambers, Pamela M Taylorharris, Argyro Syngelaki, K H Nicolaides, Catherine Williamson

    Abstract:

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) affects 1/140 UK pregnancies; with pruritus, hepatic impairment and elevated serum bile acids. Severe disease is complicated by spontaneous preterm delivery and stillbirth. Previous studies have reported mutations in hepatocellular transporters (ABCB4, ABCB11). High throughput sequencing in 147 patients was performed in the transporters ABCB4, ABCB11, ATP8B1, ABCC2 and tight junction protein 2 (TJP2). Twenty-six potentially damaging variants were identified with the following predicted protein changes: Twelve ABCB4 mutations – Arg47Gln, Met113Val, Glu161Gly, Thr175Ala, Glu528Glyfs*6, Arg590Gln, Ala601Ser, Glu884Ter, Gly722Ala, Tyr775Met (x2), Trp854Ter. Four potential ABCB11 mutations – Glu297Gly (x3) and a donor splice site mutation (intron 19). Five potential ATP8B1 mutations – Asn45Thr (x3), and two others, Glu114Gln and Lys203Glu. Two ABCC2 mutations – Glu1352Ala and a duplication (exons 24 and 25). Three potential mutations were identified in TJP2; Thr62Met (x2) and Thr626Ser. No patient harboured more than one mutation. All were heterozygous. An additional 545 cases were screened for the potential recurrent mutations of ATP8B1 (Asn45Thr) and TJP2 (Thr62Met) identifying three further occurrences of Asn45Thr. This study has expanded known mutations in ABCB4 and ABCB11 and identified roles in ICP for mutations in ATP8B1 and ABCC2. Possible novel mutations in TJP2 were also discovered.

  • intrahepatic cholestasis in two omani siblings associated with a novel homozygous ATP8B1 mutation c 379c g p l127v
    Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Hassib Narchi, A S Knisely, Suhailah Alhefeiti, Fatmah Althabahi, Jozef Hertecant, Abdulkader Souid

    Abstract:

    : We report two Omani brothers with intrahepatic cholestasis that resolved with supportive care. In one, cholestasis began in infancy; in the other, only at the age of 18 months. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous variant, c.379C>G (p.L127V) in ATP8B1. Those attending patients with cholestasis from the Arabian peninsula should be aware of this mutation and of the variation in its phenotypic effects.

  • ATP8B1 mediated spatial organization of cdc42 signaling maintains singularity during enterocyte polarization
    Journal of Cell Biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lucas J M Bruurs, Stan F. J. Van De Graaf, A S Knisely, Lisa Donker, Susan Zwakenberg, Fried J T Zwartkruis, Harry Begthel, George Posthuma, Coen C. Paulusma

    Abstract:

    During yeast cell polarization localization of the small GTPase, cell division control protein 42 homologue (Cdc42) is clustered to ensure the formation of a single bud. Here we show that the disease-associated flippase ATPase class I type 8b member 1 (ATP8B1) enables Cdc42 clustering during enterocyte polarization. Loss of this regulation results in increased apical membrane size with scattered apical recycling endosomes and permits the formation of more than one apical domain, resembling the singularity defect observed in yeast. Mechanistically, we show that to become apically clustered, Cdc42 requires the interaction between its polybasic region and negatively charged membrane lipids provided by ATP8B1. Disturbing this interaction, either by ATP8B1 depletion or by introduction of a Cdc42 mutant defective in lipid binding, increases Cdc42 mobility and results in apical membrane enlargement. Re-establishing Cdc42 clustering, by tethering it to the apical membrane or lowering its diffusion, restores normal apical membrane size in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We therefore conclude that singularity regulation by Cdc42 is conserved between yeast and human and that this regulation is required to maintain healthy tissue architecture.