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Attachment Preference

The Experts below are selected from a list of 165 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Tomotaka Umemura – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Longitudinal changes in emerging adults’ Attachment Preferencesfor their mother, father, friends, and romantic partner :Focusing on the start and end of romantic relationships
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Tomotaka Umemura, Petr Macek, Lenka Lacinova, E.saskia Kunnen

    Abstract:

    Only a few studies have longitudinally explored to whom
    emerging adults prefer to turn to seek closeness, comfort, and
    security (called Attachment Preferences), and previous studies
    on Attachment Preferences in emerging adults have focused only
    on the beginning of romantic relationships but not on the end
    of relationships. Czech emerging adults (M=21.47;SD=1.48)
    completed the questionnaire of Attachment Preferences at two
    time points, Wave 1 (Summer 2013) and Wave 2 (Summer 2014).
    Latent difference score analyses revealed that emerging adults
    who were not in a romantic relationship in Wave 1 but started a
    romantic relationship between the two waves (n=97) and those
    who had a romantic partner in both waves (n=379) were both more
    likely to increase their Attachment Preference for the romantic
    partner and decrease their Preference for friends, whereas
    those who did not start a relationship (n=185) were not.
    Emerging adults who were in a romantic relationship in Wave 1
    but were not in Wave 2 (n=69) decreased their Preference for
    the partner and increased their Preference for friends. In all
    the groups, Attachment Preferences for the mother, for the
    father, or for the family did not change. Multiple regression
    analyses further revealed that for those who had a romantic
    partner in both waves, their length of romantic relationship
    was associated with changes in Attachment Preferences for
    romantic partners and for friends.

  • Transition of Attachment hierarchy from early to late adolescence
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Tomotaka Umemura, Petr Macek, Lenka Lacinova

    Abstract:

    The primary Attachment figure shifts from parents to romantic partners in the course of development. The present study employed longitudinal data to examine how this developmental shift occurs during adolescence.Participants were 210 Czech adolescents (mean age=14.02, SD=2.05; females=54%) in four different cohorts: 6th graders (n=43), 8th graders (n=71), 10th graders (n=57), and 12th graders (n=39). They respond to our questionnaires approximately every month since October 2016 until September 2018. Using the Important People Interview (Rosenthal & Kobak, 2010), we ask adolescents to rank order their Attachment figures in 3 circumstances (1=general closeness, 2=separation distress, and 3=emergency situation). During adolescence, people transfer their Attachment Preference from parents through friends to romantic partner. It was found that a small group of adolescents seem to directly transfer their primary Attachment figure from parents to romantic partner. However, the majority of adolescents prefer their friends in their transition of their primary Attachment figure.

  • Pregnant women’s “Attachment” to their unborn baby: Are pregnant women likely to be attached to their unborn baby when they are more threatened?
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Kristína Chabadová, Tomotaka Umemura

    Abstract:

    The activation of Attachment behavior toward preferred Attachment figures appears throughout entire life. Children and adults particularly activate their Attachment behavior during threatening situations, for example, when they feel tired, ill, or separated from Attachment figures (Ainsworth, 1982; Bowlby, 1969/1982). As people grow up, preferred Attachment figures typically transfer from parents to peers (Fraley & Davis, 1997; Hazan & Zeifman, 1994), and the most commonly reported Attachment figure in adulthood is romantic partners (Doherty & Feeney, 2004). However, some pregnant women may be also attached to their unborn baby because they often feel a threat due to their potential risks connected with their oncoming childbirth. We developed this idea because people seem to develop their Attachment during life-threatening situations. For example, adults with life-threatening jobs (firefighters and soldiers) tend to develop Attachment relationships with their colleagues and fellows (Umemura et al., under review). Hence, we assume that pregnant women in the threatening situations would also develop Attachment relationships with their unborn baby, as well as with other figures. Our sample consists of 889 Czech women in their third trimester of pregnancy who were involved in our longitudinal survey study (called “the DOMOV project”). We assessed their Attachment Preferences during pregnancy using Important People Interview (Rosenthal & Kobak, 2010). We will present associations of these pregnant women’s Attachment Preference for their unborn child with their physical health, anxiety (GAD-7), depression (PHQ-9), Attachment quality to partner (ECR-RS) and marital satisfaction (RDAS) during pregnancy. Preliminary analysis showed that approximately 10% of pregnant women reported their unborn baby as one of their preferred Attachment figures.

Petr Macek – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Longitudinal changes in emerging adults’ Attachment Preferencesfor their mother, father, friends, and romantic partner :Focusing on the start and end of romantic relationships
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Tomotaka Umemura, Petr Macek, Lenka Lacinova, E.saskia Kunnen

    Abstract:

    Only a few studies have longitudinally explored to whom
    emerging adults prefer to turn to seek closeness, comfort, and
    security (called Attachment Preferences), and previous studies
    on Attachment Preferences in emerging adults have focused only
    on the beginning of romantic relationships but not on the end
    of relationships. Czech emerging adults (M=21.47;SD=1.48)
    completed the questionnaire of Attachment Preferences at two
    time points, Wave 1 (Summer 2013) and Wave 2 (Summer 2014).
    Latent difference score analyses revealed that emerging adults
    who were not in a romantic relationship in Wave 1 but started a
    romantic relationship between the two waves (n=97) and those
    who had a romantic partner in both waves (n=379) were both more
    likely to increase their Attachment Preference for the romantic
    partner and decrease their Preference for friends, whereas
    those who did not start a relationship (n=185) were not.
    Emerging adults who were in a romantic relationship in Wave 1
    but were not in Wave 2 (n=69) decreased their Preference for
    the partner and increased their Preference for friends. In all
    the groups, Attachment Preferences for the mother, for the
    father, or for the family did not change. Multiple regression
    analyses further revealed that for those who had a romantic
    partner in both waves, their length of romantic relationship
    was associated with changes in Attachment Preferences for
    romantic partners and for friends.

  • Transition of Attachment hierarchy from early to late adolescence
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Tomotaka Umemura, Petr Macek, Lenka Lacinova

    Abstract:

    The primary Attachment figure shifts from parents to romantic partners in the course of development. The present study employed longitudinal data to examine how this developmental shift occurs during adolescence.Participants were 210 Czech adolescents (mean age=14.02, SD=2.05; females=54%) in four different cohorts: 6th graders (n=43), 8th graders (n=71), 10th graders (n=57), and 12th graders (n=39). They respond to our questionnaires approximately every month since October 2016 until September 2018. Using the Important People Interview (Rosenthal & Kobak, 2010), we ask adolescents to rank order their Attachment figures in 3 circumstances (1=general closeness, 2=separation distress, and 3=emergency situation). During adolescence, people transfer their Attachment Preference from parents through friends to romantic partner. It was found that a small group of adolescents seem to directly transfer their primary Attachment figure from parents to romantic partner. However, the majority of adolescents prefer their friends in their transition of their primary Attachment figure.

  • Longitudinal changes in emerging adults’ Attachment Preferences for their mother, father, friends, and romantic partner: Focusing on the start and end of romantic relationships
    International Journal of Behavioral Development, 2016
    Co-Authors: Tomo Umemura, Petr Macek, Lenka Lacinova, E.saskia Kunnen

    Abstract:

    Only a few studies have longitudinally explored to whom emerging adults prefer to turn to seek closeness, comfort, and security (called “Attachment Preferences”), and previous studies on Attachment Preferences in emerging adults have focused only on the beginning of romantic relationships but not on the end of relationships. Czech emerging adults (M = 21.47; SD = 1.48) completed the questionnaire of Attachment Preferences at two time points, Wave 1 (Summer 2013) and Wave 2 (Summer 2014). Latent difference score analyses revealed that emerging adults who were not in a romantic relationship in Wave 1 but started a romantic relationship between the two waves (n = 97) and those who had a romantic partner in both waves (n = 379) were both more likely to increase their Attachment Preference for the romantic partner and decrease their Preference for friends, whereas those who did not start a relationship (n = 185) were not. Emerging adults who were in a romantic relationship in Wave 1 but were not in Wave 2 (n =…

Sonja A Kotz – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Attachment Preference in auditory german sentences individual differences and pragmatic strategy
    Frontiers in Psychology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Eleanor Harding, Sonja A Kotz, Daniela Sammler

    Abstract:

    : Relative clauses modify a preceding element, but as this element can be flexibly located, the point of Attachment is sometimes ambiguous. Preference for this Attachment can vary within languages such as German, yet explanations for differences in Attachment Preference related to cognitive strategies or constraints have been conflicting in the current literature. The present study aimed to assess the Preference for relative clause Attachment among German listeners and whether these Preferences could be explained by strategy or individual differences in working memory or musical rhythm ability. We performed a sentence completion experiment, conducted post hoc interviews, and measured working memory and rhythm abilities with diagnostic tests. German listeners had no homogeneous Attachment Preference, although participants consistently completed individual sentences across trials according to the general Preference that they reported offline. Differences in Attachment Preference were moreover not linked to individual differences in either working memory or musical rhythm ability. However, the pragmatic content of individual sentences sometimes overrode the general syntactic Preference in participants with lower rhythm ability. Our study makes an important contribution to the field of psycholinguistics by validating offline self-reports as a reliable diagnostic for an individual’s online relative clause Attachment Preference. The link between pragmatic strategy and rhythm ability is an interesting direction for future research.