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Abdulbari Bener – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • pw01 102 ethnic differences on the knowledge Attitude and Beliefs towards mental illness in a traditional fast developing country
    European Psychiatry, 2010
    Co-Authors: S Ghuloum, Abdulbari Bener

    Abstract:

    Aim The aim of study is to determine ethnics differences related to the knowledge, Attitude and Beliefs towards Mental Health Illness in a traditional fast developing country. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Primary Health Care (PHC) Centers.Subjects: A representative sample of 3000 Qatari and other Arab expatriates above 20 years of age and 2514 subjects (83.8%) expressed their consent to study. Methods A specific questionnaire was designed to assess the knowledge, Attitude and Beliefs towards mental health illness. Results Among the 2514 studied subjects, 50.3% were Qataris’(males 39.8% and females 60.2%) and 49.7% were Arab expatriates (58.6% males and 41.4% females). 50.6% Qatari and 44.5% Arabs believe that mental illness could be the result of punishment from God or, thought as it was due to the possession of evil spirits (40.5% Qatari’s and 37.6% Arabs). More than half of Qatari’s and Arabs think that psychiatric medication will cause addiction and consider mental illness as dangerous. 75.3% of Qatari’s and 83.4% of Arabs respondents had no problem to visit a Psychiatrist for their emotional problem, and 42.3% of Qatari’s and 36.4% of Arabs agreed to visit a healer for their problem. Less than half of the population are disturbed to work with someone who has mental illness and are afraid if anybody with mental illness are staying in next door. The common mental illness among Qatari’s and Arab Populations described are: schizophrenia, depression, autism, anxiety, epileptic, obsession, and other reported mental illnesses. Conclusion People’s knowledge and Attitude about understanding the mentally sick were of negative impact.

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  • fc02 06 gender differences on the knowledge Attitude and Beliefs towards mental health illness in a very rapid developing society
    European Psychiatry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Abdulbari Bener

    Abstract:

    Aim The aim of this study was to determine the gender differences in knowledge, Attitudes and practices toward Mental Illness in a sample of Qatari and other Arab expatriates residing in the State of Qatar. Design This is a cross sectional survey.Setting: Primary Health Care Centers. Subjects A multistage sampling design was used and a representative sample of 3300 Qatari and other Arab expatriates above 20 years of age were surveyed. Of the study sample of 3300, 2514 subjects (76.2%) expressed their consent. Methods Face to face interviews were based on this questionnaire that included variables on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, Attitude and practice toward mental illness. Results Of the study sample, 49.2% were men and 50.8% were women. More women than men believed that mental illness is due to possession by evil spirits (43.5% vs 34.5%; p Conclusion The knowledge of women towards mental illness was poor. Most of the women were afraid and not willing to keep friendship with the mentally ill.

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Rajendra Chaudhary – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • knowledge Attitude and Beliefs of young college student blood donors about human immunodeficiency virus
    Asian Journal of Transfusion Science, 2014
    Co-Authors: Anju Dubey, Atul Sonker, Rajendra Chaudhary

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Young people, who tend to be healthy, idealistic, and motivated, are an excellent pool of potential voluntary unpaid blood donors. Recruiting and retaining young blood donors improves the long term safety and sufficiency of a country’s blood supply. Knowledge, Attitude, and Beliefs about Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) should play an important role in prevention of disease transmission. Materials and Methods: This study was a questionnaire based survey, conducted to explore the levels of knowledge, Attitude, and Beliefs about HIV in young college student blood donors. Results: The results showed that the proportion of participants with comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission was lesser than expected. Increase in education level and male gender was found to be significantly associated with high HIV-related knowledge. The responses on the different aspects of HIV-related Attitude were also varied and there is still stigma associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) even in the educated groups. Discussion: There was a spectrum of myths and misperceptions emphasizing the need of education that recognizes the social context of Attitude towards HIV. Results from this study may contribute to the development of appropriate educational and training material for this group of donors which in turn, may assist in achieving the elusive goal of safe blood supply in future.

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  • knowledge Attitude and Beliefs of people in north india regarding blood donation
    Vox Sanguinis, 2014
    Co-Authors: Anju Dubey, Atul Sonker, Rahul Chaurasia, Rajendra Chaudhary

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND To develop targeted interventions in the field of donor recruitment, an understanding of existing knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs regarding blood donation is required. Recruiters should be aware of variability in different demographic strata when implementing interventions. MATERIAL and METHODS A self-administered questionnaire along with a face-to-face interview was conducted in 400 each of voluntary donors, replacement donors and non-donors to assess their knowledge, Attitude and Beliefs regarding blood donation and their motivations for giving blood. Data were analysed using ANOVA and the c2 test. RESULTS The most common reason given by non-donors (40.75%) for not donating blood was “no one asked them to give blood”. Voluntary donors had a more pleasant blood donation experience compared to replacement donors and, therefore, more of them were willing to donate again (89.5%). The knowledge scores of non-donors were lower than those of donors and, among the latter, voluntary donors had better scores compared to replacement donors. Expectedly, the frequency of false Beliefs was highest among non-donors (22.75%), with the most prevalent misbelief being that blood donation is associated with infertility. Television was found to be the most effective medium of communication for raising awareness about blood donation. CONCLUSION It is recommended that extensive blood donation campaigning should be initiated, targeting the campaigns to eliminate specific misBeliefs and reinforce motivational perceptions. Blood centres should implement strategies to improve donor retention and should aim to provide a pleasant donation experience, regardless of the donor type. The idea of voluntary blood donation needs to be intensively promoted.

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Andrew Livex Okwi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • knowledge Attitude and Beliefs of communities and health staff about echinococcus granulosus infection in selected pastoral and agropastoral regions of uganda
    Journal of Parasitology Research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Emmanuel Othieno, Michael Ocaido, Ezekiel Mupere, Leonard Omadang, Peter Oba, Andrew Livex Okwi

    Abstract:

    A descriptive cross-sectional survey was done to determine knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs of the communities and health workers about cystic echinococcosis (CE) in pastoral region of Northeastern (NE) and agropastoral regions of Eastern (E) and Central (C) Uganda. Overall a total of 1310 participants were interviewed. Community respondents from NE region were more aware of CE infection than those from Eastern (OR 4.85; CI: 3.60–6.60; ) and Central (OR 5.73; CI: 4.22–7.82; ) regions. 19.8% of the respondents from EA region had positive Attitude towards visiting witch doctors for treatment compared with 62.0% and 60.4% from NE and Central regions, respectively ( ). Notably, the awareness of CE increased with level of education ( ). There was no statistical difference between male and female respondents as far as awareness of CE was concerned ( ). 51.7% of the community respondents from Central believed CE is caused by witchcraft, compared with 31.3% and 14.3% from NE and EA regions, respectively ( ). There was no statistical difference between health staff regarding their knowledge, Attitude, and Beliefs about CE infection ( ). None of the participants knew his/her CE status. The communities need to be sensitized about CE detection, control, and management and health staff need to be trained on CE diagnosis.

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  • knowledge gaps Attitude and Beliefs of the communities about sickle cell disease in eastern and western uganda
    East African Medical Journal, 2010
    Co-Authors: Andrew Livex Okwi, W Byarugaba, C M Ndugwa, A Parkes, M Ocaido, J K Tumwine

    Abstract:

    Background: The management of sickle cell disease (SCD) has remained insurmountable in developing countries such as Uganda, because most communities are not aware of it. Objective: To determine knowledge gaps, Attitudes and Beliefs of the communities about sickle cell disease in Eastern and Western Uganda. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: The districts of Sironko and Mbale in Eastern Uganda and Mbarara and Ntungamo in Western Uganda. Subjects: Households, students and health workers. Results: Household respondents from Eastern Uganda were more aware of SCD than those from Western (p Conclusion: Respondents from Eastern Uganda were more aware of SCD than those from Western. Minority of the respondents knew their SCD status and few health staff knew how to screen it. There is need to sensitise communities and policy makers about prevention, screening and treatment of SCD.

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