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Christopher H. Dietrich – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Wing base structure supports Coleorrhyncha + Auchenorrhyncha (Insecta: Hemiptera)
    Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kazunori Yoshizawa, Naoki Ogawa, Christopher H. Dietrich

    Abstract:

    The phylogenetic placement of the moss bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Coleorrhyncha) has been highly controversial. Many apparent morphological apomorphies support the close relationship between Coleorrhyncha and Heteroptera (=true bugs). However, a recent phylogenomic study strongly supported a sister group relationship between Coleorrhyncha and Auchenorrhyncha (planthoppers, leafhoppers, treehoppers, spittlebugs, and cicadas). To test these two alternative hypotheses, we examined the fore- and hindwing base structure of the only known extant macropterous species of Coleorrhyncha using binocular and confocal laser scanning microscopes and analyzed the data selected from the wing base phylogenetically. When full morphological data including the wing base characters were analyzed, the sister group relationship between Coleorrhyncha + Heteroptera was supported, agreeing with previous consensus based on morphology. In contrast, when only wing base characters were analyzed separately, the clade Coleorrhyncha + Auchenorrhyncha was recovered, in agreement with the result from the phylogenomic study. The membranous condition of the proximal median plate in the forewing was identified as a potential synapomorphy of the latter grouping, and the absence of the tegula was excluded as a potential synapomorphy of Coleorrhyncha and Heteroptera.

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  • wing base structure supports coleorrhyncha Auchenorrhyncha insecta hemiptera
    Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kazunori Yoshizawa, Naoki Ogawa, Christopher H. Dietrich

    Abstract:

    The phylogenetic placement of the moss bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Coleorrhyncha) has been highly controversial. Many apparent morphological apomorphies support the close relationship between Coleorrhyncha and Heteroptera (=true bugs). However, a recent phylogenomic study strongly supported a sister group relationship between Coleorrhyncha and Auchenorrhyncha (planthoppers, leafhoppers, treehoppers, spittlebugs, and cicadas). To test these two alternative hypotheses, we examined the fore- and hindwing base structure of the only known extant macropterous species of Coleorrhyncha using binocular and confocal laser scanning microscopes and analyzed the data selected from the wing base phylogenetically. When full morphological data including the wing base characters were analyzed, the sister group relationship between Coleorrhyncha + Heteroptera was supported, agreeing with previous consensus based on morphology. In contrast, when only wing base characters were analyzed separately, the clade Coleorrhyncha + Auchenorrhyncha was recovered, in agreement with the result from the phylogenomic study. The membranous condition of the proximal median plate in the forewing was identified as a potential synapomorphy of the latter grouping, and the absence of the tegula was excluded as a potential synapomorphy of Coleorrhyncha and Heteroptera.

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  • Evaluating hill prairie quality in the Midwestern United States using Auchenorrhyncha (Insecta: Hemiptera) and vascular plants: a case study in implementing grassland conservation planning and management
    Biodiversity and Conservation, 2013
    Co-Authors: Adam M. Wallner, Brenda Molano-flores, Christopher H. Dietrich

    Abstract:

    In this study a habitat quality index based on Auchenorrhyncha (Insecta: Hemiptera) species composition was used to investigate the index’s ability in discriminating hill prairie quality along a gradient of disturbance, based on the Illinois Natural Areas Inventory grading criteria; whether this index differs from other vegetation-based measures of quality; and examine the relationships between Auchenorrhyncha and vegetation integrity and diversity. Auchenorrhyncha and vascular plants were sampled from 14 Illinois glacial-drift hill prairies representing a range in quality. Insects and plants were sampled from late July through August, 2007 and analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results from this study showed that Floristic Quality Index, Auchenorrhyncha Quality Index, as well as other Auchenorrhyncha and plant diversity and integrity index values are greater in high, followed by mid, then low quality hill prairie remnants. Also, these analyses showed that perennial C4 grasses are strongly associated with prairie Auchenorrhyncha. These data suggest that judicious used of prescribed burning or brush removal may be needed to prevent woody-encroachment from eliminating prairie vegetation and Auchenorrhyncha on low quality sites; and restoration of perennial C4 grasses on low quality sites are needed to support more prairie Auchenorrhyncha fauna. Reintroductions of conservative (i.e., prairie-dependent and fire-sensitive) Auchenorrhyncha may also be needed to improve Auchenorrhyncha integrity on mid and low quality sites but these reintroductions need to be used in combination with reduced burn management or the inclusion of unburned refugia to reduce the extirpation of these fire-sensitive insects.

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Jean-claude Streito – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Other Hemiptera Sternorrhyncha (Aleyrodidae, Phylloxeroidea, and Psylloidea) and Hemiptera Auchenorrhyncha. Chapter 9.4
    BioRisk, 2010
    Co-Authors: David Mifsud, Christian Cocquempot, Roland Mühlethaler, Mike Wilson, Jean-claude Streito

    Abstract:

    Apart from aphids and scales, 52 additional Sternorrhyncha hemipteran species alien to Europe have been identifi ed within Aleyrodidae (27 whitefl y species), Phylloxeroidea (9 adelgids, 2 phylloxerans) and Psylloidea (14 species of jumping plant-lice) in addition to 12 Auchenorrhyncha species (mostly Cicadellidae- 8 species). At present, the alien species represent 39% of the total whitefl y fauna and 36% of the total adelgid fauna occuring in Europe. Th e proportion is insignifi cant in the other groups. Th e arrival of alien phylloxerans and adelgids appeared to peak during the fi rst part of the 20th century. In contrast, the mean number of new records per year of alien aleyrodids, psylloids and Auchenorrhyncha increased regularly after the 1950s. For these three groups, an average of 0.5–0.6 new alien species has been recorded per year in Europe since 2000. Th e region of origin of the alien species largely diff ers between the diff erent groups. Alien aleyrodids and psylloids mainly originated from tropical regions whilst the adelgids and phylloxerans came equally from North America and Asia. A major part of the alien Auchenorrhyncha originated from North American. Most of these alien species are presently observed in man-made habitats, especially in parks and gardens but alien adelgids are mainly observed in forests because of their association with conifer trees used for aff orestation

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  • Other Hemiptera Sternorrhyncha (Aleyrodidae, Phylloxeroidea, and Psylloidea) and Hemiptera Auchenorrhyncha. Chapter 9.4
    BioRisk, 2010
    Co-Authors: David Mifsud, Christian Cocquempot, Roland Mühlethaler, Mike Wilson, Jean-claude Streito

    Abstract:

    Apart from aphids and scales, 52 additional Sternorrhyncha hemipteran species alien to Europe have been identifi ed within Aleyrodidae (27 whitefl y species), Phylloxeroidea (9 adelgids, 2 phylloxerans) and Psylloidea (14 species of jumping plant-lice) in addition to 12 Auchenorrhyncha species (mostly Cicadellidae- 8 species). At present, the alien species represent 39% of the total whitefl y fauna and 36% of the total adelgid fauna occuring in Europe. Th e proportion is insignifi cant in the other groups. Th e arrival of alien phylloxerans and adelgids appeared to peak during the fi rst part of the 20th century. In contrast, the mean number of new records per year of alien aleyrodids, psylloids and Auchenorrhyncha increased regularly after the 1950s. For these three groups, an average of 0.5–0.6 new alien species has been recorded per year in Europe since 2000. Th e region of origin of the alien species largely diff ers between the diff erent groups. Alien aleyrodids and psylloids mainly originated from tropical regions whilst the adelgids and phylloxerans came equally from North America and Asia. A major part of the alien Auchenorrhyncha originated from North American. Most of these alien species are presently observed in man-made habitats, especially in parks and gardens but alien adelgids are mainly observed in forests because of their association with conifer trees used for aff orestation

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  • Other Hemiptera Sternorrhyncha (Aleyrodidae, Phylloxeroidea, and Psylloidea) and Hemiptera Auchenorrhyncha
    , 2010
    Co-Authors: David Mifsud, Christian Cocquempot, Roland Mühlethaler, Mike Wilson, Jean-claude Streito

    Abstract:

    Apart from aphids and scales, 52 additional Sternorrhyncha hemipteran species alien to Europe have been identifi ed within Aleyrodidae (27 whitefl y species), Phylloxeroidea (9 adelgids, 2 phylloxerans) and Psylloidea (14 species of jumping plant-lice) in addition to 12 Auchenorrhyncha species (mostly Cicadellidae- 8 species). At present, the alien species represent 39% of the total whitefl y fauna and 36% of the total adelgid fauna occuring in Europe. Th e proportion is insignifi cant in the other groups. Th e arrival of alien phylloxerans and adelgids appeared to peak during the fi rst part of the 20th century. In contrast, the mean number of new records per year of alien aleyrodids, psylloids and Auchenorrhyncha increased regularly after the 1950s. For these three groups, an average of 0.5–0.6 new alien species has been recorded per year in Europe since 2000. Th e region of origin of the alien species largely diff ers between the diff erent groups. Alien aleyrodids and psylloids mainly originated from tropical regions whilst the adelgids and phylloxerans came equally from North America and Asia. A major part of the alien Auchenorrhyncha originated from North American. Most of these alien species are presently observed in man-made habitats, especially in parks and gardens but alien adelgids are mainly observed in forests because of their association with conifer trees used for aff orestation.

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David Mifsud – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A preliminary account of the Auchenorrhyncha of the Maltese Islands (Hemiptera)
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Vera D’urso, David Mifsud

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT. A total of 46 species of Auchenorrhyncha are reported from the Maltese Islands. They belong to the following families: Cixiidae (3 species), Delphacidae (7 species), Meenoplidae (1 species), Dictyopharidae (1 species), Tettigometridae (2 species), Issidae (2 species), Cicadidae (1 species), Aphrophoridae (2 species) and Cicadellidae (27 species). Since the Auchenorrhyncha fauna of Malta was never studied as such, 40 species reported in this work represent new records for this country and of these, Tamaricella complicata, an eastern Mediterranean species, is confirmed for the European territory. One species, Balclutha brevis is an established alien associated with the invasive ontain rass, Pennisetum setaceum. From a biogeographical perspective, the most interesting species are represented by Falcidius ebejeri which is endemic to Malta and Tachycixius remanei, a sub-endemic species so far known only from Italy and Malta. Three species recorded from Malta in the Fauna Europaea database were not found during the present study.

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  • Other Hemiptera Sternorrhyncha (Aleyrodidae, Phylloxeroidea, and Psylloidea) and Hemiptera Auchenorrhyncha. Chapter 9.4
    BioRisk, 2010
    Co-Authors: David Mifsud, Christian Cocquempot, Roland Mühlethaler, Mike Wilson, Jean-claude Streito

    Abstract:

    Apart from aphids and scales, 52 additional Sternorrhyncha hemipteran species alien to Europe have been identifi ed within Aleyrodidae (27 whitefl y species), Phylloxeroidea (9 adelgids, 2 phylloxerans) and Psylloidea (14 species of jumping plant-lice) in addition to 12 Auchenorrhyncha species (mostly Cicadellidae- 8 species). At present, the alien species represent 39% of the total whitefl y fauna and 36% of the total adelgid fauna occuring in Europe. Th e proportion is insignifi cant in the other groups. Th e arrival of alien phylloxerans and adelgids appeared to peak during the fi rst part of the 20th century. In contrast, the mean number of new records per year of alien aleyrodids, psylloids and Auchenorrhyncha increased regularly after the 1950s. For these three groups, an average of 0.5–0.6 new alien species has been recorded per year in Europe since 2000. Th e region of origin of the alien species largely diff ers between the diff erent groups. Alien aleyrodids and psylloids mainly originated from tropical regions whilst the adelgids and phylloxerans came equally from North America and Asia. A major part of the alien Auchenorrhyncha originated from North American. Most of these alien species are presently observed in man-made habitats, especially in parks and gardens but alien adelgids are mainly observed in forests because of their association with conifer trees used for aff orestation

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Other Hemiptera Sternorrhyncha (Aleyrodidae, Phylloxeroidea, and Psylloidea) and Hemiptera Auchenorrhyncha. Chapter 9.4
    BioRisk, 2010
    Co-Authors: David Mifsud, Christian Cocquempot, Roland Mühlethaler, Mike Wilson, Jean-claude Streito

    Abstract:

    Apart from aphids and scales, 52 additional Sternorrhyncha hemipteran species alien to Europe have been identifi ed within Aleyrodidae (27 whitefl y species), Phylloxeroidea (9 adelgids, 2 phylloxerans) and Psylloidea (14 species of jumping plant-lice) in addition to 12 Auchenorrhyncha species (mostly Cicadellidae- 8 species). At present, the alien species represent 39% of the total whitefl y fauna and 36% of the total adelgid fauna occuring in Europe. Th e proportion is insignifi cant in the other groups. Th e arrival of alien phylloxerans and adelgids appeared to peak during the fi rst part of the 20th century. In contrast, the mean number of new records per year of alien aleyrodids, psylloids and Auchenorrhyncha increased regularly after the 1950s. For these three groups, an average of 0.5–0.6 new alien species has been recorded per year in Europe since 2000. Th e region of origin of the alien species largely diff ers between the diff erent groups. Alien aleyrodids and psylloids mainly originated from tropical regions whilst the adelgids and phylloxerans came equally from North America and Asia. A major part of the alien Auchenorrhyncha originated from North American. Most of these alien species are presently observed in man-made habitats, especially in parks and gardens but alien adelgids are mainly observed in forests because of their association with conifer trees used for aff orestation

    Free Register to Access Article