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Audience Participation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3642 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Oliver Hodl – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • TOWARDS BRIDGING THE GAP IN A MUSICAL LIVE PERFORMANCE
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Fares Kayali, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Simon Holland

    Abstract:

    Performances across diverse musical genres conventionally happen with a clear one-way structure; musicians perform while spectators listen, except when they sing along, for instance. In most cases, the Audience’s opportunities for Participation are limited to relatively inexpressive forms of interaction such as clapping, swaying and interjecting. By contrast, recent emerging technologies for Audience Participation allow spectators to collaborate in expressive and targeted ways with performing artists to influence and shape musical live performances in real time. Already, a rich variety of custom-built instruments, devices and systems have been devised for Audience Participation with the potential to facilitate richly collaborative performance. The artistic potential of such technology-driven Audience Participation is high both for musicians and their Audiences. Furthermore, it can bridge the gap between the active role of musicians and the passive role of spectators. Participative technologies can qualitatively change the overall experience in new positive directions for all involved. However, if not considered carefully, Audience Participation can be annoying, may fail, and may lead to frustration. While the reasons for this can be manifold, we posit that the chances of successful Audience Participation are greatly facilitated by well- considered design. To this end, we systematically analysed a vast number of existing approaches of Audience Participation in musical and non-musical domains. In addition, we conducted two case studies at live performances to shed light on conceptual and compositional constraints within the process of designing Audience Participation. Our insights are presented as a collection of structured design aspects able to characterise participatory music performances and their broader contexts. As a result, we propose the design toolkit “LiveMAP”, which stands for “Live Music Audience Participation”, and which supports the design and creation of participatory elements in a musical live performance.

  • ICMC – DESIGNING INTERACTIVE Audience Participation USING SMART PHONES IN A MUSICAL PERFORMANCE
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Fares Kayali, Geraldine Fitzpatrick

    Abstract:

    In this paper we describe the design and evaluation of an interactive system for Audience Participation in live performances using smart phones to control the stereo panoramaoftheleadguitar. Thesystemwasdevelopedthrough feedback from both spectators and artists. The evaluation was conducted during a live concert and builds on interviews and video analysis. Findings include that musicians seem to be cautious about giving up control and that the Audience at the same time wants a reasonable amount of control and clear feedback which in turn can be obtrusive to other spectators. We outline that balancing constraints with affordances is the key to both the Audience’s and musicians’ acceptance of such a system and that a playful participatory design process can lead to better results in this regard. It is also shown that using smart phones opens up a large possibility space but at the same time their use has to be subtle to not distract too much from the music.

  • large scale Audience Participation in live music using smartphones
    Journal of New Music Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Christoph Bartmann, Fares Kayali, Peter Purgathofer

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTWe present a study and reflection about the role and use of smartphone technology for a large-scale musical performance involving Audience Participation. We evaluated a full design and deve…

Fares Kayali – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ICMC – DESIGNING INTERACTIVE Audience Participation USING SMART PHONES IN A MUSICAL PERFORMANCE
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Fares Kayali, Geraldine Fitzpatrick

    Abstract:

    In this paper we describe the design and evaluation of an interactive system for Audience Participation in live performances using smart phones to control the stereo panoramaoftheleadguitar. Thesystemwasdevelopedthrough feedback from both spectators and artists. The evaluation was conducted during a live concert and builds on interviews and video analysis. Findings include that musicians seem to be cautious about giving up control and that the Audience at the same time wants a reasonable amount of control and clear feedback which in turn can be obtrusive to other spectators. We outline that balancing constraints with affordances is the key to both the Audience’s and musicians’ acceptance of such a system and that a playful participatory design process can lead to better results in this regard. It is also shown that using smart phones opens up a large possibility space but at the same time their use has to be subtle to not distract too much from the music.

  • TOWARDS BRIDGING THE GAP IN A MUSICAL LIVE PERFORMANCE
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Fares Kayali, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Simon Holland

    Abstract:

    Performances across diverse musical genres conventionally happen with a clear one-way structure; musicians perform while spectators listen, except when they sing along, for instance. In most cases, the Audience’s opportunities for Participation are limited to relatively inexpressive forms of interaction such as clapping, swaying and interjecting. By contrast, recent emerging technologies for Audience Participation allow spectators to collaborate in expressive and targeted ways with performing artists to influence and shape musical live performances in real time. Already, a rich variety of custom-built instruments, devices and systems have been devised for Audience Participation with the potential to facilitate richly collaborative performance. The artistic potential of such technology-driven Audience Participation is high both for musicians and their Audiences. Furthermore, it can bridge the gap between the active role of musicians and the passive role of spectators. Participative technologies can qualitatively change the overall experience in new positive directions for all involved. However, if not considered carefully, Audience Participation can be annoying, may fail, and may lead to frustration. While the reasons for this can be manifold, we posit that the chances of successful Audience Participation are greatly facilitated by well- considered design. To this end, we systematically analysed a vast number of existing approaches of Audience Participation in musical and non-musical domains. In addition, we conducted two case studies at live performances to shed light on conceptual and compositional constraints within the process of designing Audience Participation. Our insights are presented as a collection of structured design aspects able to characterise participatory music performances and their broader contexts. As a result, we propose the design toolkit “LiveMAP”, which stands for “Live Music Audience Participation”, and which supports the design and creation of participatory elements in a musical live performance.

  • large scale Audience Participation in live music using smartphones
    Journal of New Music Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Christoph Bartmann, Fares Kayali, Peter Purgathofer

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTWe present a study and reflection about the role and use of smartphone technology for a large-scale musical performance involving Audience Participation. We evaluated a full design and deve…

Simon Holland – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • TOWARDS BRIDGING THE GAP IN A MUSICAL LIVE PERFORMANCE
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Fares Kayali, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Simon Holland

    Abstract:

    Performances across diverse musical genres conventionally happen with a clear one-way structure; musicians perform while spectators listen, except when they sing along, for instance. In most cases, the Audience’s opportunities for Participation are limited to relatively inexpressive forms of interaction such as clapping, swaying and interjecting. By contrast, recent emerging technologies for Audience Participation allow spectators to collaborate in expressive and targeted ways with performing artists to influence and shape musical live performances in real time. Already, a rich variety of custom-built instruments, devices and systems have been devised for Audience Participation with the potential to facilitate richly collaborative performance. The artistic potential of such technology-driven Audience Participation is high both for musicians and their Audiences. Furthermore, it can bridge the gap between the active role of musicians and the passive role of spectators. Participative technologies can qualitatively change the overall experience in new positive directions for all involved. However, if not considered carefully, Audience Participation can be annoying, may fail, and may lead to frustration. While the reasons for this can be manifold, we posit that the chances of successful Audience Participation are greatly facilitated by well- considered design. To this end, we systematically analysed a vast number of existing approaches of Audience Participation in musical and non-musical domains. In addition, we conducted two case studies at live performances to shed light on conceptual and compositional constraints within the process of designing Audience Participation. Our insights are presented as a collection of structured design aspects able to characterise participatory music performances and their broader contexts. As a result, we propose the design toolkit “LiveMAP”, which stands for “Live Music Audience Participation”, and which supports the design and creation of participatory elements in a musical live performance.

  • tmap design cards for technology mediated Audience Participation in live music
    New Directions in Music and Human-Computer Interaction, 2019
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Fares Kayali, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Simon Holland

    Abstract:

    Historically, Audiences have had various ways to participate in live music performances, including clapping, dancing, swaying, whistling, and singing. More recently, mobile and wireless devices, such as smartphones have opened up powerful new opportunities for Audience Participation. However, design for technology-mediated Audience Participation (TMAP) can be challenging: musicians and Audiences have different demands, as does the coherence of the music, and group needs can vary widely. Thus, effective TMAP design requires the balancing of knowledge from diverse perspectives and must take into account the needs of diverse roles in creating and supporting performances. This chapter focuses on the process of creating and evaluating a set of design cards to support the interaction design and evaluation of TMAP systems. The cards are based on a previously created descriptive framework for supporting interaction design and evaluation in this challenging area. We discuss the conception and development of the TMAP design cards in some detail, and present an empirical study to evaluate their practical usefulness. Particular attention is paid to the ability of the cards to support finding ideas, changing ideas, and examining ideas from different perspectives.

  • New Directions in Music and Human-Computer Interaction – TMAP Design Cards for Technology-Mediated Audience Participation in Live Music
    New Directions in Music and Human-Computer Interaction, 2019
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hodl, Fares Kayali, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Simon Holland

    Abstract:

    Historically, Audiences have had various ways to participate in live music performances, including clapping, dancing, swaying, whistling, and singing. More recently, mobile and wireless devices, such as smartphones have opened up powerful new opportunities for Audience Participation. However, design for technology-mediated Audience Participation (TMAP) can be challenging: musicians and Audiences have different demands, as does the coherence of the music, and group needs can vary widely. Thus, effective TMAP design requires the balancing of knowledge from diverse perspectives and must take into account the needs of diverse roles in creating and supporting performances. This chapter focuses on the process of creating and evaluating a set of design cards to support the interaction design and evaluation of TMAP systems. The cards are based on a previously created descriptive framework for supporting interaction design and evaluation in this challenging area. We discuss the conception and development of the TMAP design cards in some detail, and present an empirical study to evaluate their practical usefulness. Particular attention is paid to the ability of the cards to support finding ideas, changing ideas, and examining ideas from different perspectives.