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Auditory Rehabilitation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1395 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Bevan Yueh – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • improving measurement efficiency of the inner ear scale with item response theory
    Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 2018
    Co-Authors: Annika Jessen, Bevan Yueh, Andrew D Ho, Eduardo C Corrales, Jennifer J Shin

    Abstract:

    Objectives(1) To assess the 11-item Inner Effectiveness of Auditory Rehabilitation (Inner EAR) instrument with item response theory (IRT). (2) To determine whether the underlying latent ability cou…

  • adaptacion transcultural al espanol del instrumento de evaluacion de calidad de vida en pacientes usuarios de audifonos effectiveness of Auditory Rehabilitation
    Acta otorrinolaringológica española, 2013
    Co-Authors: Felipe Cardemil, Adrian Fuente, Lorena Aguayo, Patricia Esquivel, Tamara Barria, Rocio Carvajal, Rose Fromin, Ivan Villalobos, Bevan Yueh

    Abstract:

    Introduccion y objetivos
    Cada vez adquiere mayor importancia el contar con cuestionarios validos y confiables. Esto cobra mayor relevancia al evaluar la hipoacusia.

    El objetivo del trabajo es validar en poblacion hispanohablante el cuestionario Effectiveness of Auditory Rehabilitation (EAR), que evalua la calidad de vida y los aspectos auditivos en pacientes usuarios de audifonos.
    Material y metodo

    Estudio de validacion de instrumento. Se realizo adaptacion transcultural por medio de traduccion y retraduccion, luego comparacion con la version original, y evaluacion de confiabilidad y validez.
    Resultados

    Se evaluaron 69 individuos, de los cuales 44 fueron adultos mayores y 25 fueron adultos jovenes. El umbral de audicion promedio (PTP) fue 47,3 dB en oido izquierdo y 47,1 en derecho. La discriminacion de monosilabos promedio fue 83,3% en oido izquierdo y 82,9% en derecho. La consistencia interna presento un alfa de Cronbach de 0,85 y 0,77 para las dimensiones interna y externa. El coeficiente de correlacion intraclase fue de 0,80 para el modulo interno y 0,85 para el externo. La validez de constructo informo de una correlacion de 0,71 basal y 0,76 a los 3 meses para el modulo interno, y de 0,62 inicial y 0,74 a los 3 meses en el modulo externo. La magnitud de efecto fue de 1,3 y 1,1 para el modulo interno y externo.
    Discusion

    La version al espanol del cuestionario EAR parece ser un instrumento confiable y valido. Sus fortalezas son que evalua aspectos audiologicos, pero ademas aspectos esteticos y comodidad. Por ultimo, es mas sensible al cambio que otras escalas.

  • transcultural adaptation to spanish of the instrument effectiveness of Auditory Rehabilitation for the assessment of quality of life in patients using hearing aids
    Acta Otorrinolaringologica, 2013
    Co-Authors: Felipe Cardemil, Adrian Fuente, Lorena Aguayo, Patricia Esquivel, Tamara Barria, Rocio Carvajal, Rose Fromin, Ivan Villalobos, Bevan Yueh

    Abstract:

    Abstract Introduction and objectives It is becoming increasingly important to have reliable and valid questionnaires. This becomes especially important when evaluating hearing loss. The aim of this work was to validate the « Effectiveness of Auditory Rehabilitation » (EAR) questionnaire for the Spanish-speaking population. This instrument assesses quality of life and hearing aspects in patients using hearing aids. Material and method Cross-sectional validation study. A cultural adaptation through the use of English to Spanish translations and re-translations was carried out. The validity and reliability of the newly adapted instrument were evaluated. Results A total of 69 individuals (44 older adults and 25 younger adults) were examined. The pure-tone averages were 47.3 dB and 47.1 dB for the left and right ears, respectively. The mean maximum speech discrimination in silence for monosyllables were 83.3% and 82.9% for the left and right ears, respectively. Internal consistency presented Cronbach alpha values of 0.85 and 0.77 for the internal and external dimensions, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.80 for the internal module and 0.85 for the external module. Construct validity reported a correlation coefficient of 0.71 at baseline and 0.76 at 3 months after the initial assessment for the internal module, and 0.62 at baseline and 0.74 at 3 months after the initial assessment for the external module. The size effects were 1.3 and 1.1 for the internal and external modules, respectively. Conclusions The Spanish version of the EAR questionnaire seems to be a reliable and valid instrument. The evaluation of audiological aspects, as well as aspects relating to aesthetics and comfort are the main strengths of this instrument. Finally, the EAR scale is more sensitive to change than other scales.

John J. Galvin – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Maximizing cochlear implant patients’ performance with advanced speech training procedures.
    Hearing research, 2007
    Co-Authors: Qian-jie Fu, John J. Galvin

    Abstract:

    Advances in implant technology and speech processing have provided great benefit to many cochlear implant patients. However, some patients receive little benefit from the latest technology, even after many years’ experience with the device. Moreover, even the best cochlear implant performers have great difficulty understanding speech in background noise, and music perception and appreciation remain major challenges. Recent studies have shown that targeted Auditory training can significantly improve cochlear implant patients’ speech recognition performance. Such benefits are not only observed in poorly performing patients, but also in good performers under difficult listening conditions (e.g., speech noise, telephone speech, music, etc.). Targeted Auditory training has also been shown to enhance performance gains provided by new implant devices and/or speech processing strategies. These studies suggest that cochlear implantation alone may not fully meet the needs of many patients, and that additional Auditory Rehabilitation may be needed to maximize the benefits of the implant device. Continuing research will aid in the development of efficient and effective training protocols and materials, thereby minimizing the costs (in terms of time, effort and resources) associated with Auditory Rehabilitation while maximizing the benefits of cochlear implantation for all recipients.

  • Perceptual Learning and Auditory Training in Cochlear Implant Recipients
    Trends in Amplification, 2007
    Co-Authors: Qian-jie Fu, John J. Galvin

    Abstract:

    Learning electrically stimulated speech patterns can be a new and difficult experience for cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Recent studies have shown that most implant recipients at least partially adapt to these new patterns via passive, daily-listening experiences. Gradually introducing a speech processor parameter (eg, the degree of spectral mismatch) may provide for more complete and less stressful adaptation. Although the implant device restores hearing sensation and the continued use of the implant provides some degree of adaptation, active Auditory Rehabilitation may be necessary to maximize the benefit of implantation for CI recipients. Currently, there are scant resources for Auditory Rehabilitation for adult, postlingually deafened CI recipients. We recently developed a computer-assisted speech-training program to provide the means to conduct Auditory Rehabilitation at home. The training software targets important acoustic contrasts among speech stimuli, provides Auditory and visual feedback, a…

  • Computer-Assisted Speech Training for Cochlear Implant Patients: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Future Directions
    Seminars in Hearing, 2007
    Co-Authors: Qian-jie Fu, John J. Galvin

    Abstract:

    Learning electrically stimulated speech patterns can be a new and difficult experience for cochlear implant patients. Cochlear implantation alone may not fully meet the needs of many patients, and additional Auditory Rehabilitation may be necessary to maximize the benefits of the implant device. A recently developed computer-assisted speech-training program provides cochlear implant patients with the means to conduct Auditory Rehabilitation at home. The training software targets important acoustic contrasts between speech stimuli and provides Auditory and visual feedback as well as progressive training, thereby maintaining patients’ interest in the Auditory training exercises. Recent scientific studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of such specialized Auditory training programs in improving cochlear implant patients’ speech recognition performance. Provided with an inexpensive and accessible Auditory training program, cochlear implant patients may find the motivation and momentum to get the most from the implant device.

Qian-jie Fu – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Maximizing cochlear implant patients’ performance with advanced speech training procedures.
    Hearing research, 2007
    Co-Authors: Qian-jie Fu, John J. Galvin

    Abstract:

    Advances in implant technology and speech processing have provided great benefit to many cochlear implant patients. However, some patients receive little benefit from the latest technology, even after many years’ experience with the device. Moreover, even the best cochlear implant performers have great difficulty understanding speech in background noise, and music perception and appreciation remain major challenges. Recent studies have shown that targeted Auditory training can significantly improve cochlear implant patients’ speech recognition performance. Such benefits are not only observed in poorly performing patients, but also in good performers under difficult listening conditions (e.g., speech noise, telephone speech, music, etc.). Targeted Auditory training has also been shown to enhance performance gains provided by new implant devices and/or speech processing strategies. These studies suggest that cochlear implantation alone may not fully meet the needs of many patients, and that additional Auditory Rehabilitation may be needed to maximize the benefits of the implant device. Continuing research will aid in the development of efficient and effective training protocols and materials, thereby minimizing the costs (in terms of time, effort and resources) associated with Auditory Rehabilitation while maximizing the benefits of cochlear implantation for all recipients.

  • Perceptual Learning and Auditory Training in Cochlear Implant Recipients
    Trends in Amplification, 2007
    Co-Authors: Qian-jie Fu, John J. Galvin

    Abstract:

    Learning electrically stimulated speech patterns can be a new and difficult experience for cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Recent studies have shown that most implant recipients at least partially adapt to these new patterns via passive, daily-listening experiences. Gradually introducing a speech processor parameter (eg, the degree of spectral mismatch) may provide for more complete and less stressful adaptation. Although the implant device restores hearing sensation and the continued use of the implant provides some degree of adaptation, active Auditory Rehabilitation may be necessary to maximize the benefit of implantation for CI recipients. Currently, there are scant resources for Auditory Rehabilitation for adult, postlingually deafened CI recipients. We recently developed a computer-assisted speech-training program to provide the means to conduct Auditory Rehabilitation at home. The training software targets important acoustic contrasts among speech stimuli, provides Auditory and visual feedback, a…

  • Computer-Assisted Speech Training for Cochlear Implant Patients: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Future Directions
    Seminars in Hearing, 2007
    Co-Authors: Qian-jie Fu, John J. Galvin

    Abstract:

    Learning electrically stimulated speech patterns can be a new and difficult experience for cochlear implant patients. Cochlear implantation alone may not fully meet the needs of many patients, and additional Auditory Rehabilitation may be necessary to maximize the benefits of the implant device. A recently developed computer-assisted speech-training program provides cochlear implant patients with the means to conduct Auditory Rehabilitation at home. The training software targets important acoustic contrasts between speech stimuli and provides Auditory and visual feedback as well as progressive training, thereby maintaining patients’ interest in the Auditory training exercises. Recent scientific studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of such specialized Auditory training programs in improving cochlear implant patients’ speech recognition performance. Provided with an inexpensive and accessible Auditory training program, cochlear implant patients may find the motivation and momentum to get the most from the implant device.