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Auditory Screening

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Carlos Julio Tierra-criollo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Auditory steady-state responses in school-aged children: a pilot study
    Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 2015
    Co-Authors: Luciana Macedo De Resende, Filipe Ibraim Abdo, Matheus Romao, Marcela Cristina Ferreira, Sirley Alves Da Silva Carvalho, Thamara Suzi Dos Santos, Carlos Julio Tierra-criollo

    Abstract:

    Background The use of Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSRs) for Auditory Screening in school-aged children, particularly in children who are difficult to test and children with disabilities, has not been explored yet. This pilot study investigated the use of ASSR for Auditory Screening in school-aged children. Materials and methods A cross-sectional pilot study of 23 children aged 9 to 11 with normal-hearing thresholds and seven age-matched children with permanent moderate-to-profound bilateral hearing loss were examined. The tested carrier frequencies were 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz, and the stimulus was modulated between 77 and 107 Hz. The ASSRs decreased according to the tested intensity levels of 50, 40, and 30 dB sound pressure level (SPL). Sensitivity and specificity were estimated from the responses of the children with normal hearing and those with hearing loss. Results For the children with normal hearing, the 2,000-Hz frequency was detected more often in both ears and at all intensity levels compared to the other frequencies. The 500- and 2,000-Hz frequencies resulted in different response patterns in both ears. The time until response detection increased in parallel with amplitude reduction, as expected. The overall time required for the test was 15 minutes, including the time spent in volunteer preparation. The sensitivity was 97% for the three intensities, and the best specificity value was 100%, which was observed at 50 dB. Discussion The response analysis indicated that a Screening protocol for school-aged children could include 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz and that the recording of ASSRs was highly sensitive to internal and external factors. Fifty dB SPL should be considered a cut-off criterion for Screening purposes because this was the intensity level with a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100%. Conclusion The use of ASSRs might be particularly useful in school-aged children who have difficulty performing subjective hearing tests. The sensitivity and specificity data suggested that the use of ASSRs was feasible as an Auditory Screening tool. In order to determine a protocol for Screening, future studies should include a larger sample and children with mild hearing loss.

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  • Auditory steady-state responses in school-aged children: a pilot study.
    Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 2015
    Co-Authors: Luciana Macedo De Resende, Sirley Alves Da Silva Carvalho, Thamara Suzi Dos Santos, Filipe Ibraim Abdo, Matheus Romao, Marcela Cristina Ferreira, Carlos Julio Tierra-criollo

    Abstract:

    Background
    The use of Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSRs) for Auditory Screening in school-aged children, particularly in children who are difficult to test and children with disabilities, has not been explored yet. This pilot study investigated the use of ASSR for Auditory Screening in school-aged children.

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Luciana Macedo De Resende – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Auditory steady-state responses in school-aged children: a pilot study
    Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 2015
    Co-Authors: Luciana Macedo De Resende, Filipe Ibraim Abdo, Matheus Romao, Marcela Cristina Ferreira, Sirley Alves Da Silva Carvalho, Thamara Suzi Dos Santos, Carlos Julio Tierra-criollo

    Abstract:

    Background The use of Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSRs) for Auditory Screening in school-aged children, particularly in children who are difficult to test and children with disabilities, has not been explored yet. This pilot study investigated the use of ASSR for Auditory Screening in school-aged children. Materials and methods A cross-sectional pilot study of 23 children aged 9 to 11 with normal-hearing thresholds and seven age-matched children with permanent moderate-to-profound bilateral hearing loss were examined. The tested carrier frequencies were 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz, and the stimulus was modulated between 77 and 107 Hz. The ASSRs decreased according to the tested intensity levels of 50, 40, and 30 dB sound pressure level (SPL). Sensitivity and specificity were estimated from the responses of the children with normal hearing and those with hearing loss. Results For the children with normal hearing, the 2,000-Hz frequency was detected more often in both ears and at all intensity levels compared to the other frequencies. The 500- and 2,000-Hz frequencies resulted in different response patterns in both ears. The time until response detection increased in parallel with amplitude reduction, as expected. The overall time required for the test was 15 minutes, including the time spent in volunteer preparation. The sensitivity was 97% for the three intensities, and the best specificity value was 100%, which was observed at 50 dB. Discussion The response analysis indicated that a Screening protocol for school-aged children could include 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz and that the recording of ASSRs was highly sensitive to internal and external factors. Fifty dB SPL should be considered a cut-off criterion for Screening purposes because this was the intensity level with a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100%. Conclusion The use of ASSRs might be particularly useful in school-aged children who have difficulty performing subjective hearing tests. The sensitivity and specificity data suggested that the use of ASSRs was feasible as an Auditory Screening tool. In order to determine a protocol for Screening, future studies should include a larger sample and children with mild hearing loss.

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E. J. B. Zaeyen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detecting the Mid-latency Auditory Evoked Potential during Stimulation at Several Different Sound Pressure Levels
    IV Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering 2007 Bioengineering Solutions for Latin America Health, 2007
    Co-Authors: Mauricio Cagy, Antonio Fernando Catelli Infantosi, E. J. B. Zaeyen

    Abstract:

    Current approaches for Auditory Screening are usually based on the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials or on the Otoacoustic Emissions, and hence are not able to detect pathologies that affect higher Auditory centers. Therefore, the Middle Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (MLAEP) was investigated as a neurophysiologic acoustic threshold measure by using the “Evoked Potential Detector” (EPD) as an Objective Response Detection technique. The EEG was collected from ten adults during monaural click stimulation (left ear, using contralateral masking noise) with different sound pressure levels. Based on the statistical distribution of EPD under the null hypothesis (absence of response), the use of the critical value considering EEG as a colored noise and fitting the shape parameters for a Beta distribution resulted in an objective detection of MLAEP with a better specificity and a similar sensitivity than considering EEG as a white noise. Full detection over all the casuistry occurred for stimulation levels as low as those found in literature using expert-based analysis, particularly for the derivation contralateral to the stimulation. This finding suggests the use of EPD for detecting MLAEP response as an auxiliary tool for determining objectively the neurophysiologic acoustical threshold level.

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  • Assessing F SP Index Performance as an Objective MLAEP Detector during Stimulation at Several Sound Pressure Levels
    11th Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biomedical Engineering and Computing 2007, 1
    Co-Authors: Antonio Fernando Catelli Infantosi, Mauricio Cagy, E. J. B. Zaeyen

    Abstract:

    The need for a better approach for Auditory Screening is due to pathologies that can affect higher Auditory centers. Therefore, the Middle Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (MLAEP) was investigated by using the F SP statistical index. The EEG of ten adults during click stimulation with different sound pressure levels was collected. With the critical value for the statistical null hypothesis (absence of response), particularly considering EEG as a colored noise and fitting the number of degrees of freedom of the index distribution, objective detection of MLAEP resulted in a better performance than the threshold of 3.1, commonly employed in the literature. This finding suggests the F SP for detecting MLAEP response as an auxiliary tool for determining objectively the neurophysiologic acoustical threshold level.

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