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Augmentation Index

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Rafael F Schafers – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • diastolic blood pressure is an important determinant of Augmentation Index and pulse wave velocity in young healthy males
    Journal of Human Hypertension, 2003
    Co-Authors: Jens Nurnberger, Thomas Philipp, S Dammer, Opazo A Saez, Rafael F Schafers

    Abstract:

    Diastolic blood pressure is an important determinant of Augmentation Index and pulse wave velocity in young, healthy males

  • Augmentation Index is associated with cardiovascular risk
    Journal of Hypertension, 2002
    Co-Authors: Jens Nurnberger, Ayten Kefliogluscheiber, Anabelle Opazo Saez, Rene R Wenzel, Thomas Philipp, Rafael F Schafers

    Abstract:

    Objectives Augmentation Index is a parameter measured by pulse wave analysis (PWA) and is used as a surrogate measure of arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to assess whether Augmentation Index is associated with cardiovascular risk, as well as to evaluate whether the determinants of Augmentation Index are different in patients with cardiovascular disease compared to healthy subjects. Design and methods We related Augmentation Index to risk scores in 216 subjects with or without a cardiovascular disease. Subjects without cardiovascular disease were classified according to the ‘coronary risk chart’ of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), and those with cardiovascular disease were classified using the SMART (Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease) score and the EPOZ (Epidemiological Prevention study Of Zoetermeer) function. Augmentation Index was derived by PWA using carotid applanation tonometry. Augmentation Index was also correlated to age, blood pressure, heart rate, smoking history, cholesterol, height, body mass Index and gender in subjects categorized as healthy or with cardiovascular disease. Results Augmentation Index significantly increased with increasing risk scores (P < 0.0001) and was significantly correlated to cardiovascular risk (ESC: P < 0.0001; SMART: P < 0.0001; EPOZ: P < 0.0001). In subjects with and without cardiovascular disease, Augmentation Index was correlated with diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, height and gender. Age was found to be significantly correlated with Augmentation Index only in healthy subjects but not in those with atherosclerotic disease. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Augmentation Index may be a useful marker of cardiovascular risk. Further studies are required to investigate the relationship between age and Augmentation Index in subjects with

Jens Nurnberger – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • diastolic blood pressure is an important determinant of Augmentation Index and pulse wave velocity in young healthy males
    Journal of Human Hypertension, 2003
    Co-Authors: Jens Nurnberger, Thomas Philipp, S Dammer, Opazo A Saez, Rafael F Schafers

    Abstract:

    Diastolic blood pressure is an important determinant of Augmentation Index and pulse wave velocity in young, healthy males

  • Augmentation Index is associated with cardiovascular risk
    Journal of Hypertension, 2002
    Co-Authors: Jens Nurnberger, Ayten Kefliogluscheiber, Anabelle Opazo Saez, Rene R Wenzel, Thomas Philipp, Rafael F Schafers

    Abstract:

    Objectives Augmentation Index is a parameter measured by pulse wave analysis (PWA) and is used as a surrogate measure of arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to assess whether Augmentation Index is associated with cardiovascular risk, as well as to evaluate whether the determinants of Augmentation Index are different in patients with cardiovascular disease compared to healthy subjects. Design and methods We related Augmentation Index to risk scores in 216 subjects with or without a cardiovascular disease. Subjects without cardiovascular disease were classified according to the ‘coronary risk chart’ of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), and those with cardiovascular disease were classified using the SMART (Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease) score and the EPOZ (Epidemiological Prevention study Of Zoetermeer) function. Augmentation Index was derived by PWA using carotid applanation tonometry. Augmentation Index was also correlated to age, blood pressure, heart rate, smoking history, cholesterol, height, body mass Index and gender in subjects categorized as healthy or with cardiovascular disease. Results Augmentation Index significantly increased with increasing risk scores (P < 0.0001) and was significantly correlated to cardiovascular risk (ESC: P < 0.0001; SMART: P < 0.0001; EPOZ: P < 0.0001). In subjects with and without cardiovascular disease, Augmentation Index was correlated with diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, height and gender. Age was found to be significantly correlated with Augmentation Index only in healthy subjects but not in those with atherosclerotic disease. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Augmentation Index may be a useful marker of cardiovascular risk. Further studies are required to investigate the relationship between age and Augmentation Index in subjects with

Ian B Wilkinson – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • endothelial function is associated with pulse pressure pulse wave velocity and Augmentation Index in healthy humans
    Hypertension, 2006
    Co-Authors: Carmel M Mceniery, John R Cockcroft, Sharon Wallace, Isla S Mackenzie, Barry J Mcdonnell, David E Newby, Ian B Wilkinson

    Abstract:

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of mortality and is regulated by a number of factors, including vascular smooth muscle tone. However, the relationship between endothelial function and definitive measures of arterial stiffness and wave reflections has not been described in healthy individuals. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that endothelial function is inversely correlated with aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), central pulse pressure, and Augmentation Index in healthy individuals. Peripheral and central pulse pressure and Augmentation Index were determined at rest, and global endothelial function was measured using pulse wave analysis and administration of sublingual nitroglycerin and inhaled albuterol. Aortic PWV was also determined at baseline in a subset of 89 subjects. In a separate group of subjects (n=89), aortic PWV was measured and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation assessed as a measure of conduit artery endothelial function. Global endothelial function was significantly and inversely correlated with aortic PWV (r=-0.69; P<0.001), Augmentation Index (r=-0.59; P<0.001), and central (r=-0.34; P<0.001) and peripheral pulse pressure (r=-0.15; P=0.03). Moreover, there was a stronger correlation between central rather than peripheral pulse pressure. After adjusting for potential confounders, global endothelial function remained independently and inversely associated with aortic PWV and Augmentation Index. There was also a significant, inverse relationship between conduit artery endothelial function and aortic PWV (r=0.39, P<0.001), which remained independent after adjusting for confounding factors. In healthy individuals, a decline in endothelial function is associated with increased large artery stiffness, wave reflections, and central pulse pressure.

  • Endothelial Function Is Associated With Pulse Pressure, Pulse Wave Velocity, and Augmentation Index in Healthy Humans
    Hypertension, 2006
    Co-Authors: Carmel M Mceniery, John R Cockcroft, Isla S Mackenzie, Barry J Mcdonnell, David E Newby, Sharon M.l. Wallace, Yasmin, Ian B Wilkinson

    Abstract:

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of mortality and is regulated by a number of factors, including vascular smooth muscle tone. However, the relationship between endothelial function and definitive measures of arterial stiffness and wave reflections has not been described in healthy individuals. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that endothelial function is inversely correlated with aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), central pulse pressure, and Augmentation Index in healthy individuals. Peripheral and central pulse pressure and Augmentation Index were determined at rest, and global endothelial function was measured using pulse wave analysis and administration of sublingual nitroglycerin and inhaled albuterol. Aortic PWV was also determined at baseline in a subset of 89 subjects. In a separate group of subjects (n=89), aortic PWV was measured and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation assessed as a measure of conduit artery endothelial function. Global endothelial function was significantly and inversely correlated with aortic PWV (r=-0.69; P

  • increased central pulse pressure and Augmentation Index in subjects with hypercholesterolemia
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Ian B Wilkinson, K Prasad, Ian R Hall, Anne Gwenllian Thomas, Helen Maccallum, David J Webb, Michael P Frenneaux, J R Cockcroft

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the relation between serum cholesterol, arterial stiffness and central blood pressure. Background Arterial stiffness and pulse pressure are important determinants of cardiovascular risk. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on arterial stiffness is controversial, and central pulse pressure has not been previously investigated. Methods Pressure waveforms were recorded from the radial artery in 68 subjects with hypercholesterolemia and 68 controls, and corresponding central waveforms were generated using pulse wave analysis. Central pressure, Augmentation Index (AIx) (a measure of systemic stiffness) and aortic pulse wave velocity were determined. Results There was no significant difference in peripheral blood pressure between the two groups, but central pulse pressure was significantly higher in the group with hypercholesterolemia (37 ± 11 mm Hg vs. 33 ± 10 mm Hg [means ± SD]; p = 0.028). Augmentation Index was also significantly higher in the patients with hypercholesterolemia group (24.8 ± 11.3% vs. 15.6 ± 12.1%; p Conclusions Patients with hypercholesterolemia have a higher central pulse pressure and stiffer blood vessels than matched controls, despite similar peripheral blood pressures. These hemodynamic changes may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with hypercholesterolemia, and assessment may improve risk stratification.