Autoclave - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Autoclave

The Experts below are selected from a list of 327 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

R. Mcilhagger – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a comparison of physical properties of glass fibre epoxy composites produced by wet lay up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding
    Composites Part A-applied Science and Manufacturing, 1998
    Co-Authors: D Abraham, S Matthews, R. Mcilhagger

    Abstract:

    Comparisons are reported for composite samples of similar resin and fibre systems which were processed using the wet lay-up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding (RTM) by vacuum impregnation. Similar degrees of cure were obtained for laminates using the two methods of processing and the arising thermal and physical properties (tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), void content and thickness variation) were measured. The fibre dominated properties (i.e. flexural and tensile strength) were found to be higher for the Autoclaved samples due to the higher volume fraction arising from the superior compaction pressure, although when normalised on the basis of fibre volume fraction the results were similar. The matrix dominated ILSS values were higher for the RTM samples and this was attributed to improved wetting, reduced void content and a slightly lower degree of cure. Thermal analysis also indicated that the Autoclaved (60% glass fibre by volume) composite attained a slightly higher glass transition temperature than that achieved by RTM (50% fibre by volume) for similar cure times and cure temperatures. The significance of the results in an industrial context is discussed.

  • A comparison of physical properties of glass fibre epoxy composites produced by wet lay-up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding
    Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 1998
    Co-Authors: D Abraham, S Matthews, R. Mcilhagger

    Abstract:

    Comparisons are reported for composite samples of similar resin and fibre systems which were processed using the wet lay-up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding (RTM) by vacuum impregnation. Similar degrees of cure were obtained for laminates using the two methods of processing and the arising thermal and physical properties (tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), void content and thickness variation) were measured. The fibre dominated properties (i.e. flexural and tensile strength) were found to be higher for the Autoclaved samples due to the higher volume fraction arising from the superior compaction pressure, although when normalised on the basis of fibre volume fraction the results were similar. The matrix dominated ILSS values were higher for the RTM samples and this was attributed to improved wetting, reduced void content and a slightly lower degree of cure. Thermal analysis also indicated that the Autoclaved (60% glass fibre by volume) composite attained a slightly higher glass transition temperature than that achieved by RTM (50% fibre by volume) for similar cure times and cure temperatures. The significance of the results in an industrial context is discussed. © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

D Abraham – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a comparison of physical properties of glass fibre epoxy composites produced by wet lay up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding
    Composites Part A-applied Science and Manufacturing, 1998
    Co-Authors: D Abraham, S Matthews, R. Mcilhagger

    Abstract:

    Comparisons are reported for composite samples of similar resin and fibre systems which were processed using the wet lay-up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding (RTM) by vacuum impregnation. Similar degrees of cure were obtained for laminates using the two methods of processing and the arising thermal and physical properties (tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), void content and thickness variation) were measured. The fibre dominated properties (i.e. flexural and tensile strength) were found to be higher for the Autoclaved samples due to the higher volume fraction arising from the superior compaction pressure, although when normalised on the basis of fibre volume fraction the results were similar. The matrix dominated ILSS values were higher for the RTM samples and this was attributed to improved wetting, reduced void content and a slightly lower degree of cure. Thermal analysis also indicated that the Autoclaved (60% glass fibre by volume) composite attained a slightly higher glass transition temperature than that achieved by RTM (50% fibre by volume) for similar cure times and cure temperatures. The significance of the results in an industrial context is discussed.

  • A comparison of physical properties of glass fibre epoxy composites produced by wet lay-up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding
    Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 1998
    Co-Authors: D Abraham, S Matthews, R. Mcilhagger

    Abstract:

    Comparisons are reported for composite samples of similar resin and fibre systems which were processed using the wet lay-up with Autoclave consolidation and resin transfer moulding (RTM) by vacuum impregnation. Similar degrees of cure were obtained for laminates using the two methods of processing and the arising thermal and physical properties (tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), void content and thickness variation) were measured. The fibre dominated properties (i.e. flexural and tensile strength) were found to be higher for the Autoclaved samples due to the higher volume fraction arising from the superior compaction pressure, although when normalised on the basis of fibre volume fraction the results were similar. The matrix dominated ILSS values were higher for the RTM samples and this was attributed to improved wetting, reduced void content and a slightly lower degree of cure. Thermal analysis also indicated that the Autoclaved (60% glass fibre by volume) composite attained a slightly higher glass transition temperature than that achieved by RTM (50% fibre by volume) for similar cure times and cure temperatures. The significance of the results in an industrial context is discussed. © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Robert G Gilbert – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Autoclaved rice the textural property and its relation to starch leaching and the molecular structure of leached starch
    Food Chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Hongyan Li, Robert G Gilbert, Lu Yu, Wenwen Yu, Haiteng Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract Autoclave cooking is used to produce “convenience” rice. In this study, autoclaving effects on sensory properties are investigated, and mechanistic explanations in terms of the underlying molecular structure are explored by analyzing this structure by size-exclusion chromatography and fitting the results with models based on biosynthetic processes. Compared to steam cooking, autoclaving produces stickier texture, and slightly affects hardness. It is found that molecular sizes of leached starch of both Autoclaved and steam cooked rice are similar, but significantly smaller than that of the parent grain starch; model fitting parameters of leached amylopectin and amylose structures between Autoclaved rice and steam cooked rice display no large variations. The amount of leached amylopectin (an important texture-controlling parameter) of Autoclaved rice is higher than that of steam cooked rice. Correlation analysis indicates that, compared to steam-cooked rice, the stickier texture of Autoclaved rice is caused by more amylopectin leaching during autoclaving.