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Automated Tool

The Experts below are selected from a list of 14475 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Blake Hannaford – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Automated Tool Handling for the Trauma Pod Surgical Robot
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Diana C.w. Friedman, Jesse Dosher, Tim Kowalewski, Jacob Rosen, Blake Hannaford

    Abstract:

    In order to enable robotic surgery without human assistance, a means must be developed to change Tools. As part of the larger Trauma Pod Project, we developed the Tool Rack Subsystem – an Automated Tool rack capable of holding, accepting, and dispensing up to 14 Tools for the da Vinci surgical robot. Borrowing some techniques from industrial automation, we developed a robust system capable of presenting any stored Tool in 700ms or less. Tools are positively retained in a sterilizable carousel in a compliant manner designed to accomodate misalignment during Tool exchange. RFID equipment is integrated into the system and the Tools so that Tools can be inventoried and presented by function or serial number instead of rack position. The resulting device has completed testing and integration into the Trauma Pod system and met all its design requirements.

  • ICRA – Automated Tool Handling for the Trauma Pod Surgical Robot
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Diana C.w. Friedman, Jesse Dosher, Tim Kowalewski, Jacob Rosen, Blake Hannaford

    Abstract:

    In order to enable robotic surgery without human assistance, a means must be developed to change Tools. As part of the larger Trauma Pod Project, we developed the Tool Rack Subsystem – an Automated Tool rack capable of holding, accepting, and dispensing up to 14 Tools for the da Vinci surgical robot. Borrowing some techniques from industrial automation, we developed a robust system capable of presenting any stored Tool in 700ms or less. Tools are positively retained in a sterilizable carousel in a compliant manner designed to accomodate misalignment during Tool exchange. RFID equipment is integrated into the system and the Tools so that Tools can be inventoried and presented by function or serial number instead of rack position. The resulting device has completed testing and integration into the Trauma Pod system and met all its design requirements.

Diana C.w. Friedman – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Automated Tool Handling for the Trauma Pod Surgical Robot
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Diana C.w. Friedman, Jesse Dosher, Tim Kowalewski, Jacob Rosen, Blake Hannaford

    Abstract:

    In order to enable robotic surgery without human assistance, a means must be developed to change Tools. As part of the larger Trauma Pod Project, we developed the Tool Rack Subsystem – an Automated Tool rack capable of holding, accepting, and dispensing up to 14 Tools for the da Vinci surgical robot. Borrowing some techniques from industrial automation, we developed a robust system capable of presenting any stored Tool in 700ms or less. Tools are positively retained in a sterilizable carousel in a compliant manner designed to accomodate misalignment during Tool exchange. RFID equipment is integrated into the system and the Tools so that Tools can be inventoried and presented by function or serial number instead of rack position. The resulting device has completed testing and integration into the Trauma Pod system and met all its design requirements.

  • ICRA – Automated Tool Handling for the Trauma Pod Surgical Robot
    Proceedings 2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Diana C.w. Friedman, Jesse Dosher, Tim Kowalewski, Jacob Rosen, Blake Hannaford

    Abstract:

    In order to enable robotic surgery without human assistance, a means must be developed to change Tools. As part of the larger Trauma Pod Project, we developed the Tool Rack Subsystem – an Automated Tool rack capable of holding, accepting, and dispensing up to 14 Tools for the da Vinci surgical robot. Borrowing some techniques from industrial automation, we developed a robust system capable of presenting any stored Tool in 700ms or less. Tools are positively retained in a sterilizable carousel in a compliant manner designed to accomodate misalignment during Tool exchange. RFID equipment is integrated into the system and the Tools so that Tools can be inventoried and presented by function or serial number instead of rack position. The resulting device has completed testing and integration into the Trauma Pod system and met all its design requirements.

Chia-heng Tu – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ISPA – V2X: An Automated Tool for Building SystemC-Based Simulation Environments in Designing Multicore Systems-on-Chips
    International Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Processing with Applications, 2010
    Co-Authors: Yun-hung Liaw, Shih-hao Hung, Chia-heng Tu

    Abstract:

    Hardware/software (HW/SW) co-design has become an important issue for system design, and simulation environments have been utilized widely to shorten the development cycle. However, traditional hardware description languages (HDL), e.g., Verilog and VHDL, which are used by hardware designers to describe the hardware and model the hardware in a detailed simulated environment, are not appropriate for the purpose of HW/SW co-design. Instead, SystemC provides a higher-level simulation environment to the developers and is more suitable for HW/SW co-design. Furthermore, HDL-based simulation environments are far too slow to execute parallel programs as the number of processor cores increases. Thus, one would have liked an Automated Tool for converting existing HDL-based chip designs to SystemC or even higher-level functional descriptions so that the simulation speed would be acceptable for multicore systems. However, since existing Tools failed to accomplish that, we developed an Automated Tool, called V2X, to convert Verilog chip designs to SystemC. In this paper, we show that complicated Verilog-based multicore chip descriptions were translated into SystemC descriptions automatically and resulted in better performance and programmability. In our case study, V2X successfully translated the 8-core OpenSPARC T1 system-on-chip into SystemC. Without further abstraction, the simulation speed was improved by ~40 times. The two-stage translation scheme makes V2X flexible and extensible, which paves the way for further abstraction to speed up the simulation environment.

  • V2X: An Automated Tool for Building SystemC-Based Simulation Environments in Designing Multicore Systems-on-Chips
    International Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Processing with Applications, 2010
    Co-Authors: Yun-hung Liaw, Shih-hao Hung, Chia-heng Tu

    Abstract:

    Hardware/software (HW/SW) co-design has become an important issue for system design, and simulation environments have been utilized widely to shorten the development cycle. However, traditional hardware description languages (HDL), e.g., Verilog and VHDL, which are used by hardware designers to describe the hardware and model the hardware in a detailed simulated environment, are not appropriate for the purpose of HW/SW co-design. Instead, SystemC provides a higher-level simulation environment to the developers and is more suitable for HW/SW co-design. Furthermore, HDL-based simulation environments are far too slow to execute parallel programs as the number of processor cores increases. Thus, one would have liked an Automated Tool for converting existing HDL-based chip designs to SystemC or even higher-level functional descriptions so that the simulation speed would be acceptable for multicore systems. However, since existing Tools failed to accomplish that, we developed an Automated Tool, called V2X, to convert Verilog chip designs to SystemC. In this paper, we show that complicated Verilog-based multicore chip descriptions were translated into SystemC descriptions automatically and resulted in better performance and programmability. In our case study, V2X successfully translated the 8-core OpenSPARC T1 system-on-chip into SystemC. Without further abstraction, the simulation speed was improved by ~40 times. The two-stage translation scheme makes V2X flexible and extensible, which paves the way for further abstraction to speed up the simulation environment.