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Axillary Space

The Experts below are selected from a list of 165 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Mahmoud G Hagag – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Axillary Space obliteration an effective technique in reducing seroma formation after mastectomy and Axillary dissection
    Advances in Breast Cancer Research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Mohammed A Elbalshy, Asem Fayed, Mahmoud G Hagag

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Seroma is the commonest complication of breast cancer surgery, and although its consequences most often cause no more than discomfort and anxiety, more important sequelae include flap necrosis and wound dehiscence. Seroma management can be difficult and frustrating for both the patient and surgeon. Numerous methods to reduce post-mastectomy seroma formation have been tried with no consistent success. Methods: Sixty patients were prepared for modified radical mastectomy. Of those, the study group contains 30 patients and the control group contains 30 patients. Study group had Axillary Space obliteration while the other had the conventional procedure; total drain outputs were recorded daily for all patients prior to drain removal. The drains were removed when the daily drainage was less than 30 ml. Results: This study contains 60 patients, and the study group contains 30 patients, and the control group contains 30 patients. Age, tumor size, No. of positive lymph nodes were of no significant differences to be more concise on the effect of Axillary Space obliteration. The mean of day of drain removal in the control group was 13.2 ± 1.0 days (9 – 18 days) with a mean of total drain output of (4700 ± 90.3 ml) (3722 – 4930) while the mean in the study group of day of drain removal was 7.1 ± 1.3 days (6 – 12) with a mean of total drain output of 1530 ± 422 ml (range 600 – 2100 ml) p < 0.001. Conclusion: Obliteration of Axillary Space is a valuable procedure that significantly decreases seroma after mastectomy and Axillary dissection.

  • Axillary Space Obliteration”—An Effective Technique in Reducing Seroma Formation after Mastectomy and Axillary Dissection
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Mohammed A Elbalshy, Asem Fayed, Mahmoud G Hagag

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Seroma is the commonest complication of breast cancer surgery, and although its consequences most often cause no more than discomfort and anxiety, more important sequelae include flap necrosis and wound dehiscence. Seroma management can be difficult and frustrating for both the patient and surgeon. Numerous methods to reduce post-mastectomy seroma formation have been tried with no consistent success. Methods: Sixty patients were prepared for modified radical mastectomy. Of those, the study group contains 30 patients and the control group contains 30 patients. Study group had Axillary Space obliteration while the other had the conventional procedure; total drain outputs were recorded daily for all patients prior to drain removal. The drains were removed when the daily drainage was less than 30 ml. Results: This study contains 60 patients, and the study group contains 30 patients, and the control group contains 30 patients. Age, tumor size, No. of positive lymph nodes were of no significant differences to be more concise on the effect of Axillary Space obliteration. The mean of day of drain removal in the control group was 13.2 ± 1.0 days (9 – 18 days) with a mean of total drain output of (4700 ± 90.3 ml) (3722 – 4930) while the mean in the study group of day of drain removal was 7.1 ± 1.3 days (6 – 12) with a mean of total drain output of 1530 ± 422 ml (range 600 – 2100 ml) p < 0.001. Conclusion: Obliteration of Axillary Space is a valuable procedure that significantly decreases seroma after mastectomy and Axillary dissection.

Norihisa Tonami – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Brown adipose tissue: Evaluation with^201Tl and^99mTc-sestamibi dual-tracer SPECT
    Annals of Nuclear Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Takahiro Higuchi, Seigo Kinuya, Junichi Taki, Kenichi Nakajima, Masatoshi Ikeda, Masanobu Namura, Norihisa Tonami

    Abstract:

    Brown adipose tissue is one kind of adipose tissue and regulates body temperature and balance of energy via non-shivering thermogenesis. The authors present a case that strongly suggested the presence of activated brown adipose tissue in the neck, shoulders and Axillary Space by increased^18F-FDG uptake.^99mTc-sestamibi and^201Tl dual-tracer SPECT study showed increased 99mTc-sestamibi uptake and non-increased^201? uptake in the corresponding^18F-FDG uptake sites. Brown adipose tissue has dense mitochondria in the cells, which play an important role in thermogenesis.^99mTc-sestamibi uptake and retention depend on the mitochondrial activity but^201Tl uptake does not. Therefore, the activity of mitochondria in activated brown adipose tissue may explain the discrepant uptake between^99mTc-sestamibi and^201Tl.

  • Brown adipose tissue: evaluation with 201Tl and 99mTc-sestamibi dual-tracer SPECT.
    Annals of Nuclear Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Takahiro Higuchi, Seigo Kinuya, Junichi Taki, Kenichi Nakajima, Masatoshi Ikeda, Masanobu Namura, Norihisa Tonami

    Abstract:

    Brown adipose tissue is one kind of adipose tissue and regulates body temperature and balance of energy via non-shivering thermogenesis. The authors present a case that strongly suggested the presence of activated brown adipose tissue in the neck, shoulders and Axillary Space by increased 18F-FDG uptake. 99mTc-sestamibi and 201Tl dual-tracer SPECT study showed increased 99mTc-sestamibi uptake and non-increased 201Tl uptake in the corresponding 18F-FDG uptake sites. Brown adipose tissue has dense mitochondria in the cells, which play an important role in thermogenesis. 99mTc-sestamibi uptake and retention depend on the mitochondrial activity but 201Tl uptake does not. Therefore, the activity of mitochondria in activated brown adipose tissue may explain the discrepant uptake between 99mTc-sestamibi and 201Tl.

Melissa M. Awburn – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Migration inhibitory factor in the cerebral and systemic endothelium in sepsis and malaria.
    Critical care medicine, 2020
    Co-Authors: Ian Clark, Melissa M. Awburn

    Abstract:

    We have included migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in an ongoing immunohistochemical study comparing the site and intensity of the generation of inflammatory mediators in falciparum malaria, sepsis, and other causes of pediatric death in Africa. We wanted to determine whether it could account for our observation that inducible nitric oxide synthase is less strongly induced in the cerebral, compared with the systemic, vasculature.
    Comparisons of tissue samples taken from blood vessel walls from the brain and the Axillary Space in a series of sepsis and falciparum malaria autopsies of African children.
    Intense staining for MIF has been detected in endothelial cells of Axillary region vessels of all sepsis cases and most of the malaria cases examined. This parallels our findings with inducible nitric oxide synthase staining. African and Western control tissues from noninfectious causes of death stained lightly or not at all. In contrast, MIF could not be detected in vascular endothelial cells within the brain, where inducible nitric oxide synthase staining was much less intense. Detection of both MIF and inducible nitric oxide synthase in ependymal and glial cells in the same brains served as an internal positive staining control.
    These outcomes add weight to the proposal that endothelial cells are a site of intense inflammatory mediator activity in sepsis and malaria. They also suggest that suppression of anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids by MIF may be lower in the brain than elsewhere in the body. The lack of MIF in cerebral vasculature endothelial cells may be linked to the absence of thrombomodulin in these cells. The systemic cellular distribution and intensity of MIF in human systemic inflammatory states has not been described.

  • Migration inhibitory factor in the cerebral and systemic endothelium in sepsis and malaria.
    Critical Care Medicine, 2002
    Co-Authors: Ian A. Clark, Melissa M. Awburn

    Abstract:

    Objective: We have included migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in an ongoing immunohistochemical study comparing the site and intensity of the generation of inflammatory mediators in falciparum malaria, sepsis, and other causes of pediatric death in Africa. We wanted to determine whether it could account for our observation that inducible nitric oxide synthase is less strongly induced in the cerebral, compared with the systemic, vasculature. Data Sources: Comparisons of tissue samples taken from blood vessel walls from the brain and the Axillary Space in a series of sepsis and falciparum malaria autopsies of African children. Data Summary: Intense staining for MIF has been detected in endothelial cells of Axillary region vessels of all sepsis cases and most of the malaria cases examined. This parallels our findings with inducible nitric oxide synthase staining. African and Western control tissues from noninfectious causes of death stained lightly or not at all. In contrast, MIF could not be detected in vascular endothelial cells within the brain, where inducible nitric oxide synthase staining was much less intense. Detection of both MIF and inducible nitric oxide synthase in ependymal and glial cells in the same brains served as an internal positive staining control. Conclusion: These outcomes add weight to the proposal that endothelial cells are a site of intense inflammatory mediator activity in sepsis and malaria. They also suggest that suppression of anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids by MIF may be lower in the brain than elsewhere in the body. The lack of MIF in cerebral vasculature endothelial cells may be linked to the absence of thrombomodulin in these cells. The systemic cellular distribution and intensity of MIF in human systemic inflammatory states has not been described.