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Bacampicillin

The Experts below are selected from a list of 24 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Per Hultman – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • characterization of primary recall in vitro lymphocyte responses to Bacampicillin in allergic subjects
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2000
    Co-Authors: Karin Cederbrant, Maritha Marcussonstahl, Per Hultman

    Abstract:

    Background
    Antigen-specific cell lines or clones are often used as models of drug-specific allergy. However, cloning procedures are time consuming, and the repeated antigen stimulation cycles as well as the addition of various growth enhancers may affect the in vivo relevance of these systems.

    Objective
    Using Bacampicillin-allergic subjects, we wanted to investigate the applicability of primary recall in vitro lymphocyte responses to characterize type I and type IV allergy. The sensitivity and specificity of LTT (Lymphocyte transformation test), when used as an in vitro diagnostic tool, were also assessed.

    Methods
    A total of 39 patients with symptoms of type I (rhinitis) or type IV (allergic contact dermatitis, ACD) allergy following occupational exposure to Bacampicillin, were included. Ten individuals without penicillin allergy or occupational exposure to Bacampicillin served as controls. All subjects were LTT tested. Four patients with rhinitis and two patients with ACD were available for studying the immunophenotype and the TCR-Vβ repertoire of Bacampicillin induced lymphoblasts as well as the cytokine profiles and expression of the activation markers CD23 and CD134 in primary PBMC cultures.

    Results
    LTT was positive in 87% and at least one of the skin tests was positive in 85% of the patients with allergic symptoms. 69% of the patients with type I allergies were patch test-positive. Results from LTT and skin test correlated in 87% of the cases. The combined sensitivity of LTT and skin tests was 92%. The specificity of LTT was 90% in healthy controls. Bacampicillin induced lymphoblasts were mainly CD4 + in both ACD and rhinitis patients. The TCR-Vβ profiles of the predominant CD4 + lymphoblasts were heterogeneous with individual skewing towards Vβ2, Vβ3, Vβ5.1 and/or Vβ14. An increased expression of IFNγ was detected in Bacampicillin treated PBMC cultures from the ACD but not from rhinitis patients. IL-5 was detected in Bacampicillin exposed PBMC cultures from all patients but not from healthy controls. This Th2 environment could also be verified by CD23 and CD134 expression.

    Conclusion
    LTT and skin tests are equally sensitive in identifying Bacampicillin allergic subjects. When the two tests are combined, the sensitivity increases. The patch test is useful not only for detection of type IV but also for the identification of type I allergies. When using primary PBMC cultures, IFNγ is the most suitable cytokine to discriminate between type I and type IV allergy. IL-5 can possibly be used as a general marker for Bacampicillin induced allergy. Thus, primary cell cultures may be considered as an alternative to T-cell lines or clones for the study of drug induced allergy.

Karin Cederbrant – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • characterization of primary recall in vitro lymphocyte responses to Bacampicillin in allergic subjects
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2000
    Co-Authors: Karin Cederbrant, Maritha Marcussonstahl, Per Hultman

    Abstract:

    Background
    Antigen-specific cell lines or clones are often used as models of drug-specific allergy. However, cloning procedures are time consuming, and the repeated antigen stimulation cycles as well as the addition of various growth enhancers may affect the in vivo relevance of these systems.

    Objective
    Using Bacampicillin-allergic subjects, we wanted to investigate the applicability of primary recall in vitro lymphocyte responses to characterize type I and type IV allergy. The sensitivity and specificity of LTT (Lymphocyte transformation test), when used as an in vitro diagnostic tool, were also assessed.

    Methods
    A total of 39 patients with symptoms of type I (rhinitis) or type IV (allergic contact dermatitis, ACD) allergy following occupational exposure to Bacampicillin, were included. Ten individuals without penicillin allergy or occupational exposure to Bacampicillin served as controls. All subjects were LTT tested. Four patients with rhinitis and two patients with ACD were available for studying the immunophenotype and the TCR-Vβ repertoire of Bacampicillin induced lymphoblasts as well as the cytokine profiles and expression of the activation markers CD23 and CD134 in primary PBMC cultures.

    Results
    LTT was positive in 87% and at least one of the skin tests was positive in 85% of the patients with allergic symptoms. 69% of the patients with type I allergies were patch test-positive. Results from LTT and skin test correlated in 87% of the cases. The combined sensitivity of LTT and skin tests was 92%. The specificity of LTT was 90% in healthy controls. Bacampicillin induced lymphoblasts were mainly CD4 + in both ACD and rhinitis patients. The TCR-Vβ profiles of the predominant CD4 + lymphoblasts were heterogeneous with individual skewing towards Vβ2, Vβ3, Vβ5.1 and/or Vβ14. An increased expression of IFNγ was detected in Bacampicillin treated PBMC cultures from the ACD but not from rhinitis patients. IL-5 was detected in Bacampicillin exposed PBMC cultures from all patients but not from healthy controls. This Th2 environment could also be verified by CD23 and CD134 expression.

    Conclusion
    LTT and skin tests are equally sensitive in identifying Bacampicillin allergic subjects. When the two tests are combined, the sensitivity increases. The patch test is useful not only for detection of type IV but also for the identification of type I allergies. When using primary PBMC cultures, IFNγ is the most suitable cytokine to discriminate between type I and type IV allergy. IL-5 can possibly be used as a general marker for Bacampicillin induced allergy. Thus, primary cell cultures may be considered as an alternative to T-cell lines or clones for the study of drug induced allergy.

Toshiharu Matsushima – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Nonimmunocompromised mouse model of penicillin-resistantStreptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia
    Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy, 1996
    Co-Authors: Sadao Tamada, Masamitsu Nakajima, Yoshihito Niki, Toshiharu Matsushima

    Abstract:

    Penicillin-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) are a growing problem, both in Japan and elsewhere. To study therapeutic approaches to respiratory infection by these resistant bacteria, we identified two clinically isolated PRSP strains which exhibit strong virulence against nonimmunocompromised CBA/J mice. Most mice infected with these strains die of pneumonia within two weeks. In infections by one strain, survival rates were slightly improved by Bacampicillin doses of 20 mg/kg/day for five days but not by lower doses. Survival rates following infection by the other strain were unaffected by Bacampicillin at any dose tested. We believe that our animal model of PRSP pneumonia using these two strains can be useful for evaluating therapy of PRSP infections.