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Bacterial Microbiome

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Kelly A Brayton – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • laboratory colonization stabilizes the naturally dynamic Microbiome composition of field collected dermacentor andersoni ticks
    Microbiome, 2017
    Co-Authors: Cory A Gall, Glen A Scoles, Kathleen L Mason, Krisztian Magori, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Nearly a quarter of emerging infectious diseases identified in the last century are arthropod-borne. Although ticks and insects can carry pathogenic microorganisms, non-pathogenic microbes make up the majority of their microbial communities. The majority of tick Microbiome research has had a focus on discovery and description; very few studies have analyzed the ecological context and functional responses of the Bacterial Microbiome of ticks. The goal of this analysis was to characterize the stability of the Bacterial Microbiome of Dermacentor andersoni ticks between generations and two populations within a species. The Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni midguts and salivary glands was analyzed from populations collected at two different ecologically distinct sites by comparing field (F1) and lab-reared populations (F1-F3) over three generations. The Microbiome composition of pooled and individual samples was analyzed by sequencing nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using a Pacific Biosciences CCS platform that allows identification of bacteria to the species level. In this study, we found that the D. andersoni Microbiome was distinct in different geographic populations and was tissue specific, differing between the midgut and the salivary gland, over multiple generations. Additionally, our study showed that the Microbiomes of laboratory-reared populations were not necessarily representative of their respective field populations. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Microbiome of a few individual ticks does not represent the Microbiome composition at the population level. We demonstrated that the Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni was complex over three generations and specific to tick tissue (midgut vs. salivary glands) as well as geographic location (Burns, Oregon vs. Lake Como, Montana vs. laboratory setting). These results provide evidence that habitat of the tick population is a vital component of the complexity of the Bacterial Microbiome of ticks, and that the Microbiome of lab colonies may not allow for comparative analyses with field populations. A broader understanding of Microbiome variation will be required if we are to employ manipulation of the Microbiome as a method for interfering with acquisition and transmission of tick-borne pathogens.

  • the Bacterial Microbiome of dermacentor andersoni ticks influences pathogen susceptibility
    The ISME Journal, 2016
    Co-Authors: Cory A Gall, Glen A Scoles, Kathryn E Reif, Kathleen L Mason, M R Mousel, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Ticks are of medical importance owing to their ability to transmit pathogens to humans and animals. The Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni, is a vector of a number of pathogens, including Anaplasma marginale, which is the most widespread tick-borne pathogen of livestock. Although ticks host pathogenic bacteria, they also harbor Bacterial endosymbionts that have a role in tick physiology, survival, as well as pathogen acquisition and transmission. The goal of this study was to characterize the Bacterial Microbiome and examine the impact of Microbiome disruption on pathogen susceptibility. The Bacterial Microbiome of two populations of D. andersoni with historically different susceptibilities to A. marginale was characterized. In this study, the Microbiome was disrupted and then ticks were exposed to A. marginale or Francisella novicida to determine whether the Microbiome correlated with pathogen susceptibility. Our study showed that an increase in proportion and quantity of Rickettsia bellii in the Microbiome was negatively correlated to A. marginale levels in ticks. Furthermore, a decrease in Francisella endosymbionts was associated with lower F. novicida infection levels, demonstrating a positive pathogen–endosymbiont relationship. We demonstrate that endosymbionts and pathogens have varying interactions, and suggest that Microbiome manipulation may provide a possible method for biocontrol by decreasing pathogen susceptibility of ticks.

  • the characterization and manipulation of the Bacterial Microbiome of the rocky mountain wood tick dermacentor andersoni
    Parasites & Vectors, 2015
    Co-Authors: Katie A Clayton, Cory A Gall, Katheen L Mason, Glen A Scoles, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Background
    In North America, ticks are the most economically impactful vectors of human and animal pathogens. The Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni (Acari: Ixodidae), transmits Rickettsia rickettsii and Anaplasma marginale to humans and cattle, respectively. In recent years, studies have shown that symbiotic organisms are involved in a number of biochemical and physiological functions. Characterizing the Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni is a pivotal step towards understanding symbiont-host interactions.

Cory A Gall – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • laboratory colonization stabilizes the naturally dynamic Microbiome composition of field collected dermacentor andersoni ticks
    Microbiome, 2017
    Co-Authors: Cory A Gall, Glen A Scoles, Kathleen L Mason, Krisztian Magori, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Nearly a quarter of emerging infectious diseases identified in the last century are arthropod-borne. Although ticks and insects can carry pathogenic microorganisms, non-pathogenic microbes make up the majority of their microbial communities. The majority of tick Microbiome research has had a focus on discovery and description; very few studies have analyzed the ecological context and functional responses of the Bacterial Microbiome of ticks. The goal of this analysis was to characterize the stability of the Bacterial Microbiome of Dermacentor andersoni ticks between generations and two populations within a species. The Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni midguts and salivary glands was analyzed from populations collected at two different ecologically distinct sites by comparing field (F1) and lab-reared populations (F1-F3) over three generations. The Microbiome composition of pooled and individual samples was analyzed by sequencing nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using a Pacific Biosciences CCS platform that allows identification of bacteria to the species level. In this study, we found that the D. andersoni Microbiome was distinct in different geographic populations and was tissue specific, differing between the midgut and the salivary gland, over multiple generations. Additionally, our study showed that the Microbiomes of laboratory-reared populations were not necessarily representative of their respective field populations. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Microbiome of a few individual ticks does not represent the Microbiome composition at the population level. We demonstrated that the Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni was complex over three generations and specific to tick tissue (midgut vs. salivary glands) as well as geographic location (Burns, Oregon vs. Lake Como, Montana vs. laboratory setting). These results provide evidence that habitat of the tick population is a vital component of the complexity of the Bacterial Microbiome of ticks, and that the Microbiome of lab colonies may not allow for comparative analyses with field populations. A broader understanding of Microbiome variation will be required if we are to employ manipulation of the Microbiome as a method for interfering with acquisition and transmission of tick-borne pathogens.

  • the Bacterial Microbiome of dermacentor andersoni ticks influences pathogen susceptibility
    The ISME Journal, 2016
    Co-Authors: Cory A Gall, Glen A Scoles, Kathryn E Reif, Kathleen L Mason, M R Mousel, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Ticks are of medical importance owing to their ability to transmit pathogens to humans and animals. The Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni, is a vector of a number of pathogens, including Anaplasma marginale, which is the most widespread tick-borne pathogen of livestock. Although ticks host pathogenic bacteria, they also harbor Bacterial endosymbionts that have a role in tick physiology, survival, as well as pathogen acquisition and transmission. The goal of this study was to characterize the Bacterial Microbiome and examine the impact of Microbiome disruption on pathogen susceptibility. The Bacterial Microbiome of two populations of D. andersoni with historically different susceptibilities to A. marginale was characterized. In this study, the Microbiome was disrupted and then ticks were exposed to A. marginale or Francisella novicida to determine whether the Microbiome correlated with pathogen susceptibility. Our study showed that an increase in proportion and quantity of Rickettsia bellii in the Microbiome was negatively correlated to A. marginale levels in ticks. Furthermore, a decrease in Francisella endosymbionts was associated with lower F. novicida infection levels, demonstrating a positive pathogen–endosymbiont relationship. We demonstrate that endosymbionts and pathogens have varying interactions, and suggest that Microbiome manipulation may provide a possible method for biocontrol by decreasing pathogen susceptibility of ticks.

  • the characterization and manipulation of the Bacterial Microbiome of the rocky mountain wood tick dermacentor andersoni
    Parasites & Vectors, 2015
    Co-Authors: Katie A Clayton, Cory A Gall, Katheen L Mason, Glen A Scoles, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Background
    In North America, ticks are the most economically impactful vectors of human and animal pathogens. The Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni (Acari: Ixodidae), transmits Rickettsia rickettsii and Anaplasma marginale to humans and cattle, respectively. In recent years, studies have shown that symbiotic organisms are involved in a number of biochemical and physiological functions. Characterizing the Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni is a pivotal step towards understanding symbiont-host interactions.

Glen A Scoles – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • laboratory colonization stabilizes the naturally dynamic Microbiome composition of field collected dermacentor andersoni ticks
    Microbiome, 2017
    Co-Authors: Cory A Gall, Glen A Scoles, Kathleen L Mason, Krisztian Magori, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Nearly a quarter of emerging infectious diseases identified in the last century are arthropod-borne. Although ticks and insects can carry pathogenic microorganisms, non-pathogenic microbes make up the majority of their microbial communities. The majority of tick Microbiome research has had a focus on discovery and description; very few studies have analyzed the ecological context and functional responses of the Bacterial Microbiome of ticks. The goal of this analysis was to characterize the stability of the Bacterial Microbiome of Dermacentor andersoni ticks between generations and two populations within a species. The Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni midguts and salivary glands was analyzed from populations collected at two different ecologically distinct sites by comparing field (F1) and lab-reared populations (F1-F3) over three generations. The Microbiome composition of pooled and individual samples was analyzed by sequencing nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using a Pacific Biosciences CCS platform that allows identification of bacteria to the species level. In this study, we found that the D. andersoni Microbiome was distinct in different geographic populations and was tissue specific, differing between the midgut and the salivary gland, over multiple generations. Additionally, our study showed that the Microbiomes of laboratory-reared populations were not necessarily representative of their respective field populations. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Microbiome of a few individual ticks does not represent the Microbiome composition at the population level. We demonstrated that the Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni was complex over three generations and specific to tick tissue (midgut vs. salivary glands) as well as geographic location (Burns, Oregon vs. Lake Como, Montana vs. laboratory setting). These results provide evidence that habitat of the tick population is a vital component of the complexity of the Bacterial Microbiome of ticks, and that the Microbiome of lab colonies may not allow for comparative analyses with field populations. A broader understanding of Microbiome variation will be required if we are to employ manipulation of the Microbiome as a method for interfering with acquisition and transmission of tick-borne pathogens.

  • the Bacterial Microbiome of dermacentor andersoni ticks influences pathogen susceptibility
    The ISME Journal, 2016
    Co-Authors: Cory A Gall, Glen A Scoles, Kathryn E Reif, Kathleen L Mason, M R Mousel, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Ticks are of medical importance owing to their ability to transmit pathogens to humans and animals. The Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni, is a vector of a number of pathogens, including Anaplasma marginale, which is the most widespread tick-borne pathogen of livestock. Although ticks host pathogenic bacteria, they also harbor Bacterial endosymbionts that have a role in tick physiology, survival, as well as pathogen acquisition and transmission. The goal of this study was to characterize the Bacterial Microbiome and examine the impact of Microbiome disruption on pathogen susceptibility. The Bacterial Microbiome of two populations of D. andersoni with historically different susceptibilities to A. marginale was characterized. In this study, the Microbiome was disrupted and then ticks were exposed to A. marginale or Francisella novicida to determine whether the Microbiome correlated with pathogen susceptibility. Our study showed that an increase in proportion and quantity of Rickettsia bellii in the Microbiome was negatively correlated to A. marginale levels in ticks. Furthermore, a decrease in Francisella endosymbionts was associated with lower F. novicida infection levels, demonstrating a positive pathogen–endosymbiont relationship. We demonstrate that endosymbionts and pathogens have varying interactions, and suggest that Microbiome manipulation may provide a possible method for biocontrol by decreasing pathogen susceptibility of ticks.

  • the characterization and manipulation of the Bacterial Microbiome of the rocky mountain wood tick dermacentor andersoni
    Parasites & Vectors, 2015
    Co-Authors: Katie A Clayton, Cory A Gall, Katheen L Mason, Glen A Scoles, Kelly A Brayton

    Abstract:

    Background
    In North America, ticks are the most economically impactful vectors of human and animal pathogens. The Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni (Acari: Ixodidae), transmits Rickettsia rickettsii and Anaplasma marginale to humans and cattle, respectively. In recent years, studies have shown that symbiotic organisms are involved in a number of biochemical and physiological functions. Characterizing the Bacterial Microbiome of D. andersoni is a pivotal step towards understanding symbiont-host interactions.