Balanus - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Balanus

The Experts below are selected from a list of 141 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Anthony S Clare – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids Balanus improvisus
    Biofouling, 2014
    Co-Authors: A Di Fino, Luigi Petrone, Nick Aldred, Thomas Ederth, Bo Liedberg, Anthony S Clare

    Abstract:

    In laboratory-based biofouling assays, the influence of physico-chemical surface characteristics on barnacle settlement has been tested most frequently using the model organism Balanus amphitrite (= AmphiBalanus amphitrite). Very few studies have addressed the settlement preferences of other barnacle species, such as Balanus improvisus (= AmphiBalanus improvisus). This study aimed to unravel the effects of surface physico-chemical cues, in particular surface-free energy (SFE) and surface charge, on the settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus. The use of well-defined surfaces under controlled conditions further facilitates comparison of the results with recent similar data for B. amphitrite. Zero-day-old cyprids of B. improvisus were exposed to a series of model surfaces, namely self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols with varying end-groups, homogenously applied to gold-coated polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes. As with B. amphitrite, settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus was influenced by both SFE an…

  • construction of an adult barnacle Balanus amphitrite cdna library and selection of reference genes for quantitative rt pcr studies
    BMC Molecular Biology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Tristano Bacchetti De Gregoris, Marco Borra, Elio Biffali, Thomas Bekel, Grant J Burgess, Richard R Kirby, Anthony S Clare

    Abstract:

    Background
    Balanus amphitrite is a barnacle commonly used in biofouling research. Although many aspects of its biology have been elucidated, the lack of genetic information is impeding a molecular understanding of its life cycle. As part of a wider multidisciplinary approach to reveal the biogenic cues influencing barnacle settlement and metamorphosis, we have sequenced and annotated the first cDNA library for B. amphitrite. We also present a systematic validation of potential reference genes for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) data obtained from different developmental stages of this animal.

  • Balanus amphitrite or amphiBalanus amphitrite a note on barnacle nomenclature
    Biofouling, 2008
    Co-Authors: Anthony S Clare, Jens T Hoeg

    Abstract:

    In a recent revision of the Balanidae based on morphological systematics, the much studied fouling species Balanus amphitrite was renamed AmphiBalanus amphitrite. Here, the case is made for retaining the former nomenclature. Taxonomists are urged to exercise caution before introducing new formal taxonomies, which should ideally be based on several independent lines of evidence.

Ryusuke Kado – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • invasion of japanese shores by the ne pacific barnacle Balanus glandula and its ecological and biogeographical impact
    Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2003
    Co-Authors: Ryusuke Kado

    Abstract:

    A common littoral barnacle, Balanus glandula Darwin, 1854 (Crustacea, Cirripedia) from the west coast of North America has become established in the mid-littoral zone of harbors on the Pacific side of northern Honshu, Japan. The new immigrant occupies space in the lower half of the Chthamalus spp. and Balanus albicostatus zones, and in the upper fringe of the SemiBalanus cariosus zone. However, the species has not been detected in harbors along the Sea of Japan, south of the Ozika Peninsula, northern Honshu, and to the north and east of Kushiro, Hokkaido. Considering its present distribution, shell sizes, and abundance, it is most likely that it was introduced into 3 separate port areas in NE Honshu, Japan, during the last 20 to 40 yr, probably by anthropogenic activities. It was apparently also introduced to the La Plata estuary, Argentina, during the same period. B. glandula is becoming a dominant littoral zone species, especially in embayments, largely at the expense of the tropical endemic B. albicostatus in the upper littoral fringe. Taking into account the biogeographical distribution of common Japanese barnacles in relation to water temperature, the future distribution of the newly introduced species is considered.

  • Effect of Light on the Larval Development of Balanus amphitrite Darwin(Cirripedia).
    Nippon Suisan Gakkaishi, 1991
    Co-Authors: Ryusuke Kado

    Abstract:

    Balanus amphitrite larvae were reared to select the best algal diet and to determine the effect of light on the larval development. Chaetoceros calcitrans was found to have the best food value as Skeletonema costatum among five algal diets tested. The larval growth speed was not affected by the light when the ample amount of C. calcitrans was supplied. So did the difference in the light-dark frequencies (18L6D, 6×3L1D) neither. This fact suggests that light itself has little effect on larval development when the supplied food is sufficient for the larvae to grow.

Denis Dubourdieu – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Reassessment of phenotypic traits for Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum wine yeast strains.
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Isabelle Masneuf-pomarede, Marina Bely, Philippe Marullo, Aline Lonvaud-funel, Denis Dubourdieu

    Abstract:

    Among Saccharomyces yeast, S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus var. uvarum are related species, sharing the same ecosystem in sympatry. The physiological and technological properties of a large collection of genetically-identified S. bayanus var. uvarum wine strains were investigated in a biometric study and their fermentation behavior was compared at 24 °C and 13 °C. The variability of the phenotypic traits was considered at both intraspecific and interspecific levels. Low ethanol tolerance at 24 °C and production of high levels of 2-phenylethanol and its acetate were clearly revealed as discriminative technological traits, distinguishing the S. bayanus var. uvarum strains from S. cerevisiae. Although some S. bayanus var. uvarum strains produced very small amounts of acetic acid, this was not a species-specific trait, as the distribution of values was similar in both species. Fermentation kinetics at 24 °C showed that S. bayanus var. uvarum maintained a high fermentation rate after Vmax, with low nitrogen requirements, but stuck fermentations were observed at later stages. In contrast, a shorter lag phase compared with S.cerevisiae, higher cell viability, and the ability to complete alcoholic fermentation at 13 °C confirmed the low-temperature adaptation trait of S.bayanus var. uvarum. This study produced a phenotypic characterization data set for a collection of S. bayanus var. uvarum strains, thus paving the way for industrial developments using this species as a new genetic resource.

  • Reassessment of phenotypic traits for Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum wine yeast strains.
    International journal of food microbiology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Isabelle Masneuf-pomarede, Marina Bely, Philippe Marullo, Aline Lonvaud-funel, Denis Dubourdieu

    Abstract:

    Among Saccharomyces yeast, S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus var. uvarum are related species, sharing the same ecosystem in sympatry. The physiological and technological properties of a large collection of genetically-identified S. bayanus var. uvarum wine strains were investigated in a biometric study and their fermentation behavior was compared at 24 degrees C and 13 degrees C. The variability of the phenotypic traits was considered at both intraspecific and interspecific levels. Low ethanol tolerance at 24 degrees C and production of high levels of 2-phenylethanol and its acetate were clearly revealed as discriminative technological traits, distinguishing the S. bayanus var. uvarum strains from S. cerevisiae. Although some S. bayanus var. uvarum strains produced very small amounts of acetic acid, this was not a species-specific trait, as the distribution of values was similar in both species. Fermentation kinetics at 24 degrees C showed that S. bayanus var. uvarum maintained a high fermentation rate after Vmax, with low nitrogen requirements, but stuck fermentations were observed at later stages. In contrast, a shorter lag phase compared with S.cerevisiae, higher cell viability, and the ability to complete alcoholic fermentation at 13 degrees C confirmed the low-temperature adaptation trait of S.bayanus var. uvarum. This study produced a phenotypic characterization data set for a collection of S. bayanus var. uvarum strains, thus paving the way for industrial developments using this species as a new genetic resource.