Banana Fibre - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Banana Fibre

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1293 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Sabu Thomas – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • thermal stability and degradation of Banana Fibre pf composites fabricated by rtm
    Fibers and Polymers, 2012
    Co-Authors: K N Indira, P Jyotishkumar, Sabu Thomas

    Abstract:

    The influence of chemical modifications of Banana Fibres and Fibre/PF composites fabricated by RTM technique was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The kinetic studies of thermal degradation of untreated and treated Fibres have been performed using Broido method. The treatment causes variation in the surface topography of the Fibres. Therefore, more energy is needed for the degradation of Fibres and hence higher activation energy for decomposition. Fiber reinforced composites with 40 wt% fiber loading was found to be more thermally stable. Furthermore, the treated Fibre-reinforced composites with 40 wt% fiber loading posses superior thermal stability with respect to untreated fiber-reinforced composites; especially with the alkali treated fiber reinforced composites.

  • Thermal Stability and Degradation of Banana Fibre/PF Composites Fabricated by RTM
    Fibers and Polymers, 2012
    Co-Authors: K N Indira, P Jyotishkumar, Sabu Thomas

    Abstract:

    The influence of chemical modifications of Banana Fibres and Fibre/PF composites fabricated by RTM technique was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The kinetic studies of thermal degradation of untreated and treated Fibres have been performed using Broido method. The treatment causes variation in the surface topography of the Fibres. Therefore, more energy is needed for the degradation of Fibres and hence higher activation energy for decomposition. Fiber reinforced composites with 40 wt% fiber loading was found to be more thermally stable. Furthermore, the treated Fibre-reinforced composites with 40 wt% fiber loading posses superior thermal stability with respect to untreated fiber-reinforced composites; especially with the alkali treated fiber reinforced composites.

  • adhesion and wettability characteristics of chemically modified Banana Fibre for composite manufacturing
    Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, 2011
    Co-Authors: K N Indira, Yves Grohens, C Baley, Sabu Thomas, Kuruvilla Joseph, Laly A Pothen

    Abstract:

    In this work Banana Fibre was chemically modified using various chemical agents. The surface energy of the Fibre is an important parameter and one which governs the interaction of Fibre with polymeric matrices. This paper describes the influence of various chemical treatments on the surface energy of the Banana Fibre investigated by contact angle measurements, spectroscopic analysis and surface morphology studies. The surface energy, work of adhesion, polarity, spreading coefficient, interfacial energy and interaction parameter were determined in the case of raw and chemically modified Fibres. Chemical modification has been found to have a profound effect on the surface energy. The polar and dispersive components of the surface energy were also found to be dependent on the chemical treatment involved. The chemical modifications done in this work were: alkali treatment, silanation, benzoylation, formylation, potassium permanganate treatment and acetylation. Of all the modifications, the relative surface en…

Yeo Kiam Beng – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • mechanical properties of woven Banana Fibre reinforced epoxy composites
    Materials & Design, 2006
    Co-Authors: S M Sapuan, A Leenie, Mohamed Harimi, Yeo Kiam Beng

    Abstract:

    In this paper, the experiments of tensile and flexural (three-point bending) tests were carried out using natural Fibre with composite materials (Musaceae/epoxy). Three samples prepared from woven Banana Fibre composites of different geometries were used in this research. From the results obtained, it was found that the maximum value of stress in x-direction is 14.14 MN/m2, meanwhile the maximum value of stress in y-direction is 3.398 MN/m2. For the Young’s modulus, the value of 0.976 GN/m2 in x-direction and 0.863 GN/m2 in y-direction were computed. As for the case of three-point bending (flexural), the maximum load applied is 36.25 N to get the deflection of woven Banana Fibre specimen beam of 0.5 mm. The maximum stress and Young’s modulus in x-direction was recorded to be 26.181 MN/m2 and 2.685 GN/m2, respectively. Statistical analysis using ANOVA-one way has showed that the differences of results obtained from those three samples are not significant, which confirm a very stable mechanical behaviour of the composites under different tests. This shows the importance of this product and allows many researchers to develop an adequate system for producing a good quality of woven Banana Fibre composite which maybe used for household utilities.

S M Sapuan – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Tensile and Flexural Behavior of Hybrid Banana Pseudostem/Glass Fibre Reinforced Polyester Composites
    Key Engineering Materials, 2011
    Co-Authors: I N Hanifawati, S M Sapuan, M Azmah A Hanim, E S Zainuddin

    Abstract:

    Natural Fibre-based thermoset composites are generally lower in strength performance compared to synthetic thermoset composites. Hybridization with some amount of synthetic Fibre enhanced the mechanical properties of the composites. This study focused on the performance of mechanical properties of hybrid Banana/glass Fibre reinforced polyester composites. Hybrid composites with different volume ratios of Banana to glass Fibre were prepared. The reinforcing effect of both Fibres in polyester is also evaluated in various Fibre loadings. Results showed that both flexural and tensile properties have been improved with the increasing level of overall Fibre content loading. Tensile and flexural strength shows great enhancement by the introduction of a slight amount of glass Fibre to the Banana Fibre polyester matrix.

  • tensile and flexural behavior of hybrid Banana pseudostem glass Fibre reinforced polyester composites
    Key Engineering Materials, 2011
    Co-Authors: I N Hanifawati, S M Sapuan, M Azmah A Hanim, E S Zainuddin

    Abstract:

    Natural Fibre-based thermoset composites are generally lower in strength performance compared to synthetic thermoset composites. Hybridization with some amount of synthetic Fibre enhanced the mechanical properties of the composites. This study focused on the performance of mechanical properties of hybrid Banana/glass Fibre reinforced polyester composites. Hybrid composites with different volume ratios of Banana to glass Fibre were prepared. The reinforcing effect of both Fibres in polyester is also evaluated in various Fibre loadings. Results showed that both flexural and tensile properties have been improved with the increasing level of overall Fibre content loading. Tensile and flexural strength shows great enhancement by the introduction of a slight amount of glass Fibre to the Banana Fibre polyester matrix.

  • mechanical properties of woven Banana Fibre reinforced epoxy composites
    Materials & Design, 2006
    Co-Authors: S M Sapuan, A Leenie, Mohamed Harimi, Yeo Kiam Beng

    Abstract:

    In this paper, the experiments of tensile and flexural (three-point bending) tests were carried out using natural Fibre with composite materials (Musaceae/epoxy). Three samples prepared from woven Banana Fibre composites of different geometries were used in this research. From the results obtained, it was found that the maximum value of stress in x-direction is 14.14 MN/m2, meanwhile the maximum value of stress in y-direction is 3.398 MN/m2. For the Young’s modulus, the value of 0.976 GN/m2 in x-direction and 0.863 GN/m2 in y-direction were computed. As for the case of three-point bending (flexural), the maximum load applied is 36.25 N to get the deflection of woven Banana Fibre specimen beam of 0.5 mm. The maximum stress and Young’s modulus in x-direction was recorded to be 26.181 MN/m2 and 2.685 GN/m2, respectively. Statistical analysis using ANOVA-one way has showed that the differences of results obtained from those three samples are not significant, which confirm a very stable mechanical behaviour of the composites under different tests. This shows the importance of this product and allows many researchers to develop an adequate system for producing a good quality of woven Banana Fibre composite which maybe used for household utilities.