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Barber Surgeon

The Experts below are selected from a list of 138 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Philippe Hernigou – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Other aspects of Ambroise Paré’s life
    International Orthopaedics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Philippe Hernigou

    Abstract:

    His father was, according to some, a cabinet maker, but others, on probably better traditional evidence, state that he was valet de chambre and Barber to the Sieur de Laval. Several of his near relatives were in medical occupations. Thus his sister Catherine married Gaspard Martin, a master BarberSurgeon of Paris. He died following an amputation of the leg performed upon him by Pare. In a pamphlet written by a Surgeon named Comperat, Pare was accused of having been more or less responsible for his brother-in-law’s death, because he had used the method of ligation of the vessels to check the haemorrhage at the operation, instead of cauterising the stump. One brother, Jean, whom Pare greatly praises his skill in detecting the frauds of beggars who shammed diseases and deformities, was a master BarberSurgeon at Vitre, and Pare and is supposed to have studied with him at for a time. He had another brother, also named Jean, who was a cabinet maker in Paris. Pare adopted his daughter Jeanne, giving her a handsome dowry when she married Claude Viart, a Surgeon of Paris, who had lived 20 years in Pare’s house as his pupil (Figs. 1, ​,22).

  • Ambroise Paré’s life (1510–1590): part I
    International Orthopaedics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Philippe Hernigou

    Abstract:

    Ambroise Paré (1510–20 December 1590) was a French BarberSurgeon who served in that role for Kings Henry II, Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III. Ambroise Paré is considered one of the fathers of surgery and modern forensic pathology; a pioneer in surgical techniques and battlefield medicine, especially in the treatment of wounds. He was also an anatomist and invented several surgical instruments.

  • Ambroise Paré’s life (1510-1590): part I.
    International Orthopaedics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Philippe Hernigou

    Abstract:

    Ambroise Pare (1510–20 December 1590) was a French BarberSurgeon who served in that role for Kings Henry II, Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III. Ambroise Pare is considered one of the fathers of surgery and modern forensic pathology; a pioneer in surgical techniques and battlefield medicine, especially in the treatment of wounds. He was also an anatomist and invented several surgical instruments.

Charles E Bagwell – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • respectful image revenge of the Barber Surgeon
    Annals of Surgery, 2005
    Co-Authors: Charles E Bagwell

    Abstract:

    Although some separation of surgery from the practice of medicine had begun to develop in early medieval times, this was accentuated in 1215 by the Fourth Lateran Council, a papal edict which forbade physicians (most of whom where clergy) from performing surgical procedures, as contact with blood or body fluids was viewed as contaminating to men of the church. As a result, the practice of surgery was relegated to craft status with training by apprenticeship through guilds. Physicians followed a university-directed program of education, which involved knowledge of the classics and writings of ancient medical authors such as those by Galen, which allowed no independent thought or inquiry. Competition among physicians and Surgeons, including the lowest group of surgical practitioners, the Barbers, continued until Henry VIII signed a charter in 1540 uniting Barbers and Surgeons in London. This Guild of Barbers and Surgeons, forerunner of the Royal College of Surgeons, established a regulatory agency for training and certification of surgical practice, which set the stage for legitimizing surgery as a profession.

Duncan P Thomas – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Thomas Vicary and the anatomie of mans body.
    Medical History, 2020
    Co-Authors: Duncan P Thomas

    Abstract:

    The Tudor BarberSurgeon, Thomas Vicary (1490?–1561/2) is remembered for three main reasons. As Sergeant-Surgeon to Henry VIII, he used his position at court to advance the status of surgery in England. In the famous Holbein painting, Henry VIII is shown handing the charter of the 1540 Act of Union between the Barbers and Surgeons to Vicary, emphasizing the prominent role he played in promoting this amalgamation. Second, Vicary played a major role in the successful refoundation of one of the great London hospitals, St Bartholomew’s, after the dissolution of the monasteries. Third, he was the author of the first textbook of anatomy published in English, which is the subject of this article.1

  • thomas vicary Barber Surgeon
    Journal of Medical Biography, 2006
    Co-Authors: Duncan P Thomas

    Abstract:

    : An Act of Parliament in 1540 uniting the Barbers and Surgeons to form the BarberSurgeons’ Company represented an important foundation stone towards better surgery in England. Thomas Vicary, who played a pivotal role in promoting this union, was a leading Surgeon in London in the middle of the 16th century. While Vicary made no direct contribution to surgical knowledge, he should be remembered primarily as one who contributed much towards the early organization and teaching of surgery and to the consequent benefits that flowed from this improvement.