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Barnes Maze

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1932 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Richard E Brown – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Early detection of cognitive deficits in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease.
    Behavioural Brain Research, 2015
    Co-Authors: Kurt R. Stover, Mackenzie A. Campbell, Christine M. Van Winssen, Richard E Brown

    Abstract:

    Abstract Which behavioral test is the most sensitive for detecting cognitive deficits in the 3xTg-AD at 6.5 months of age? The 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has three transgenes (APPswe, PS1M146V, and Tau P301L) which cause the development of amyloid beta plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and cognitive deficits with age. In order to determine which task is the most sensitive in the early detection of cognitive deficits, we compared male and female 3xTg-AD and B6129SF2 wildtype mice at 6.5 months of age on a test battery including spontaneous alternation in the Y-Maze, novel object recognition, spatial memory in the Barnes Maze, and cued and contextual fear conditioning. The 3xTg-AD mice had impaired learning and memory in the Barnes Maze but performed better than B6129SF2 wildtype mice in the Y-Maze and in contextual fear conditioning. Neither genotype demonstrated a preference in the novel object recognition task nor was there a genotype difference in cued fear conditioning but females performed better than males. From our results we conclude that the 3xTg-AD mice have mild cognitive deficits in spatial learning and memory and that the Barnes Maze was the most sensitive test for detecting these cognitive deficits in 6.5-month-old mice.

  • optimization of apparatus design and behavioral measures for the assessment of visuo spatial learning and memory of mice on the Barnes Maze
    Learning & Memory, 2013
    Co-Authors: Timothy P Oleary, Richard E Brown

    Abstract:

    : We have previously shown that apparatus design can affect visual-spatial cue use and memory performance of mice on the Barnes Maze. The present experiment extends these findings by determining the optimal behavioral measures and test procedure for analyzing visuo-spatial learning and memory in three different Barnes Maze designs. Male and female C57BL/6J mice were trained with a stable or random escape hole location and the sensitivities (statistical power) of four commonly used measures of learning and three measures of memory to detect differences between these training procedures were compared on each Maze design. A Maze design with a large diameter and no wall was optimal, because mice showed a reliable use of extra-Maze visual cues, visuo-spatial search strategies, and spatial memory. A Maze design with a small diameter, surrounding wall, and intra-Maze visual cues was the least sensitive for determining visuo-spatial learning and memory, because mice showed little evidence of extra-Maze cue use. Errors, distance traveled, and hole deviation scores were more sensitive measures of learning than latency to find the escape hole. Measures based on locating the escape hole (primary measures) were more sensitive than measures based on entering the escape hole (total measures). Measures of memory had similar levels of sensitivity on each Maze. This experiment demonstrates that both apparatus design and the behavioral measures used as indicators of learning and memory can influence the ability of the Barnes Maze to detect visuo-spatial learning and memory impairments in mice.

  • the effects of apparatus design and test procedure on learning and memory performance of c57bl 6j mice on the Barnes Maze
    Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 2012
    Co-Authors: Timothy P Oleary, Richard E Brown

    Abstract:

    The Barnes Maze is a visuo-spatial learning and memory test originally designed for use with rats, and later adapted for use with mice. The Barnes Maze design and test procedure vary across studies using mice, but the effects of variation in Barnes Maze design and test procedure on learning and memory in mice have not yet been investigated. Therefore the present experiment investigates whether test procedures, such as the number of habituation trials and parameters of the probe trial (correct zone size and trial length) influence learning and memory performance on three Barnes Maze designs that differed in size and the presence of a wall with intra-Maze visual cues. Performance was compared across the three Mazes to determine how apparatus design influences visuo-spatial cue use. The number of habituation trials and parameters of the probe trial had small effects on learning and memory performance. Apparatus design, had little effect on acquisition performance but had a significant effect on memory performance. Mice on a Maze with a small diameter, external wall and intra-Maze visual cues had very poor visuo-spatial memory relative to mice tested on small and large diameter Mazes without a wall or intra-Maze visual cues. Assessment of visuo-spatial cue use indicated that mice do not rely on visuo-spatial cues to locate the escape hole on the small-diameter Maze with a wall and intra-Maze visual cues, but show reliable visuo-spatial cue use on small or large diameter Mazes with no wall. These results indicate that apparatus design influences search strategy use and memory performance on the Barnes Maze, and that including a wall around the edge of the Barnes Maze decreases visuo-spatial cue use.

Jeanbastien Bott – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • spatial reference memory is associated with modulation of theta gamma coupling in the dentate gyrus
    Cerebral Cortex, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jeanbastien Bott, Jeanchristophe Cassel, Marcantoine Muller, Jesse Jackson, Julien Aubert

    Abstract:

    Spatial reference memory in rodents represents a unique opportunity to study brain mechanisms responsible for encoding, storage and retrieval of a memory. Even though its reliance on hippocampal networks has long been established, the precise computations performed by different hippocampal subfields during spatial learning are still not clear. To study the evolution of electrophysiological activity in the CA1-dentate gyrus axis of the dorsal hippocampus over an iterative spatial learning paradigm, we recorded local field potentials in behaving mice using a newly designed appetitive version of the Barnes Maze. We first showed that theta and gamma oscillations as well as theta-gamma coupling are differentially modulated in particular hippocampal subfields during the task. In addition, we show that dentate gyrus networks, but not CA1 networks, exhibit a transient learning-dependent increase in theta-gamma coupling specifically at the vicinity of the target area in the Maze. In contrast to previous immediate early-gene studies, our results point to a long-lasting involvement of dentate networks in navigational memory in the Barnes Maze. Based on these findings, we propose that theta-gamma coupling might represent a mechanism by which hippocampal areas compute relevant information.

  • Spatial Reference Memory is Associated with Modulation of Theta–Gamma Coupling in the Dentate Gyrus
    Cerebral Cortex, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jeanbastien Bott, Jeanchristophe Cassel, Marcantoine Muller, Jesse Jackson, Julien Aubert, Chantal Mathis, Romain Goutagny

    Abstract:

    : Spatial reference memory in rodents represents a unique opportunity to study brain mechanisms responsible for encoding, storage and retrieval of a memory. Even though its reliance on hippocampal networks has long been established, the precise computations performed by different hippocampal subfields during spatial learning are still not clear. To study the evolution of electrophysiological activity in the CA1-dentate gyrus axis of the dorsal hippocampus over an iterative spatial learning paradigm, we recorded local field potentials in behaving mice using a newly designed appetitive version of the Barnes Maze. We first showed that theta and gamma oscillations as well as theta-gamma coupling are differentially modulated in particular hippocampal subfields during the task. In addition, we show that dentate gyrus networks, but not CA1 networks, exhibit a transient learning-dependent increase in theta-gamma coupling specifically at the vicinity of the target area in the Maze. In contrast to previous immediate early-gene studies, our results point to a long-lasting involvement of dentate networks in navigational memory in the Barnes Maze. Based on these findings, we propose that theta-gamma coupling might represent a mechanism by which hippocampal areas compute relevant information.

Jeanchristophe Cassel – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • spatial reference memory is associated with modulation of theta gamma coupling in the dentate gyrus
    Cerebral Cortex, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jeanbastien Bott, Jeanchristophe Cassel, Marcantoine Muller, Jesse Jackson, Julien Aubert

    Abstract:

    Spatial reference memory in rodents represents a unique opportunity to study brain mechanisms responsible for encoding, storage and retrieval of a memory. Even though its reliance on hippocampal networks has long been established, the precise computations performed by different hippocampal subfields during spatial learning are still not clear. To study the evolution of electrophysiological activity in the CA1-dentate gyrus axis of the dorsal hippocampus over an iterative spatial learning paradigm, we recorded local field potentials in behaving mice using a newly designed appetitive version of the Barnes Maze. We first showed that theta and gamma oscillations as well as theta-gamma coupling are differentially modulated in particular hippocampal subfields during the task. In addition, we show that dentate gyrus networks, but not CA1 networks, exhibit a transient learning-dependent increase in theta-gamma coupling specifically at the vicinity of the target area in the Maze. In contrast to previous immediate early-gene studies, our results point to a long-lasting involvement of dentate networks in navigational memory in the Barnes Maze. Based on these findings, we propose that theta-gamma coupling might represent a mechanism by which hippocampal areas compute relevant information.

  • Spatial Reference Memory is Associated with Modulation of Theta–Gamma Coupling in the Dentate Gyrus
    Cerebral Cortex, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jeanbastien Bott, Jeanchristophe Cassel, Marcantoine Muller, Jesse Jackson, Julien Aubert, Chantal Mathis, Romain Goutagny

    Abstract:

    : Spatial reference memory in rodents represents a unique opportunity to study brain mechanisms responsible for encoding, storage and retrieval of a memory. Even though its reliance on hippocampal networks has long been established, the precise computations performed by different hippocampal subfields during spatial learning are still not clear. To study the evolution of electrophysiological activity in the CA1-dentate gyrus axis of the dorsal hippocampus over an iterative spatial learning paradigm, we recorded local field potentials in behaving mice using a newly designed appetitive version of the Barnes Maze. We first showed that theta and gamma oscillations as well as theta-gamma coupling are differentially modulated in particular hippocampal subfields during the task. In addition, we show that dentate gyrus networks, but not CA1 networks, exhibit a transient learning-dependent increase in theta-gamma coupling specifically at the vicinity of the target area in the Maze. In contrast to previous immediate early-gene studies, our results point to a long-lasting involvement of dentate networks in navigational memory in the Barnes Maze. Based on these findings, we propose that theta-gamma coupling might represent a mechanism by which hippocampal areas compute relevant information.