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Barrier Nursing

The Experts below are selected from a list of 258 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Okumi Nkuku – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The reemergence of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1995. Commission de Lutte contre les Epidémies à Kikwit.
    The Journal of infectious diseases, 1999
    Co-Authors: Ali S Khan, David L Heymann, Bernard Le Guenno, Pierre Nabeth, Barbara Kerstiens, Yon Fleerackers, Peter H Kilmarx, G Rodier, F K Tshioko, Okumi Nkuku

    Abstract:

    In May 1995, an international team characterized and contained an outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Active surveillance was instituted using several methods, including house-to-house search, review of hospital and dispensary logs, interview of health care personnel, retrospective contact tracing, and direct follow-up of suspect cases. In the field, a clinical case was defined as fever and hemorrhagic signs, fever plus contact with a case-patient, or fever plus at least 3 of 10 symptoms. A total of 315 cases of EHF, with an 81% case fatality, were identified, excluding 10 clinical cases with negative laboratory results. The earliest documented case-patient had onset on 6 January, and the last case-patient died on 16 July. Eighty cases (25%) occurred among health care workers. Two individuals may have been the source of infection for >50 cases. The outbreak was terminated by the initiation of BarrierNursing techniques, health education efforts, and rapid identification of cases.

  • the reemergence of ebola hemorrhagic fever democratic republic of the congo 1995
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 1999
    Co-Authors: Ali S Khan, Kweteminga F Tshioko, David L Heymann, Bernard Le Guenno, Pierre Nabeth, Barbara Kerstiens, Yon Fleerackers, Peter H Kilmarx, G Rodier, Okumi Nkuku

    Abstract:

    In May 1995, an international team characterized and contained an outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Active surveillance was instituted using several methods, including house-to-house search, review of hospital and dispensary logs, interview of health care personnel, retrospective contact tracing, and direct follow-up of suspect cases. In the field, a clinical case was defined as fever and hemorrhagic signs, fever plus contact with a case-patient, or fever plus at least 3 of 10 symptoms. A total of 315 cases of EHF, with an 81% case fatality, were identified, excluding 10 clinical cases with negative laboratory results. The earliest documented case-patient had onset on 6 January, and the last case-patient died on 16 July. Eighty cases (25%) occurred among health care workers. Two individuals may have been the source of infection for >50 cases. The outbreak was terminated by the initiation of BarrierNursing techniques, health education efforts, and rapid identification of cases.

Kweteminga F Tshioko – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the reemergence of ebola hemorrhagic fever democratic republic of the congo 1995
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 1999
    Co-Authors: Ali S Khan, Kweteminga F Tshioko, David L Heymann, Bernard Le Guenno, Pierre Nabeth, Barbara Kerstiens, Yon Fleerackers, Peter H Kilmarx, G Rodier, Okumi Nkuku

    Abstract:

    In May 1995, an international team characterized and contained an outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Active surveillance was instituted using several methods, including house-to-house search, review of hospital and dispensary logs, interview of health care personnel, retrospective contact tracing, and direct follow-up of suspect cases. In the field, a clinical case was defined as fever and hemorrhagic signs, fever plus contact with a case-patient, or fever plus at least 3 of 10 symptoms. A total of 315 cases of EHF, with an 81% case fatality, were identified, excluding 10 clinical cases with negative laboratory results. The earliest documented case-patient had onset on 6 January, and the last case-patient died on 16 July. Eighty cases (25%) occurred among health care workers. Two individuals may have been the source of infection for >50 cases. The outbreak was terminated by the initiation of BarrierNursing techniques, health education efforts, and rapid identification of cases.

  • long term disease surveillance in bandundu region democratic republic of the congo a model for early detection and prevention of ebola hemorrhagic fever
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 1999
    Co-Authors: Ethleen Lloyd, Kweteminga F Tshioko, Sherif R Zaki, Pierre E Rollin, Mpia Ado Bwaka, Thomas G Ksiazek, Philippe Calain, Wun Ju Shieh, Kader M Konde, Eric Verchueren

    Abstract:

    After the large-scale outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) in Bandundu region, Democratic Republic of the Congo, a program was developed to help detect and prevent future outbreaks of EHF in the region. The long-term surveillance and prevention strategy is based on early recognition by physicians, immediate initiation of enhanced BarrierNursing practices, and the use of an immunohistochemical diagnostic test performed on formalin-fixed skin specimens of patients who die of suspected viral hemorrhagic fever. The program was implemented in September 1995 during a 4-day workshop with 28 local physicians representing 17 of 22 health zones in the region. Specimen collection kits were distributed to clinics in participating health zones, and a follow-up evaluation was conducted after 6 months. The use of a formalin-fixed skin specimen for laboratory confirmation of EHF can provide an appropriate method for EHF surveillance when linked with physician training, use of viral hemorrhagic fever isolation precautions, and follow-up investigation.

Robert Colebunders – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Organisation of health care during an outbreak of Marburg haemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 1999.
    Journal of Infection, 2004
    Co-Authors: Robert Colebunders, Hilde Sleurs, Patricia Pirard, Matthias Borchert, Modeste L. Libande, Jean Pierre Mustin, Antoine Tshomba, Léon Kinuani, Loku Abisa Olinda, Florimond Tshioko

    Abstract:

    Abstract Organising health care was one of the tasks of the International Scientific and Technical Committee during the 1998–1999 outbreak in Durba/Watsa, in the north-eastern province (Province Orientale), Democratic Republic of Congo. With the logistical support of Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF), two isolation units were created: one at the Durba Reference Health Centre and the other at the Okimo Hospital in Watsa. Between May 6th, the day the isolation unit was installed and May 19th, 15 patients were admitted to the Durba Health Centre. In only four of them were the diagnosis of Marburg haemorrhagic fever (MHF) confirmed by laboratory examination. Protective equipment was distributed to health care workers and family members caring for patients. Information about MHF, modes of transmission and the use of Barrier Nursing techniques was provided to health care workers and sterilisation procedures were reviewed. In contrast to Ebola outbreaks, there was little panic among health care workers and the general public in Durba and all health services remained operational.

  • epidemiologic and clinical aspects of the ebola virus epidemic in mosango democratic republic of the congo 1995
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 1999
    Co-Authors: Roger Ndambi, Philippe Akamituna, Mariejo Bonnet, Anicet Mazaya Tukadila, Jeanjacques Muyembetamfum, Robert Colebunders

    Abstract:

    Twenty-three Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) cases (15 males, 8 females) were identified in Mosango, Democratic Republic of the Congo; 18 (78%) of them died. Eight of the patients came from Kikwit General Hospital and were hospitalized at Mosango General Hospital, 10 acquired their infection at the Mosango hospital and were treated there, and 5 acquired their infection through contact with a hospitalized patient but were never hospitalized themselves. For most of the EHF cases, it was clear that they had been in contact with blood or body fluids of another EHF patient. The Ebola outbreak in Mosango remained relatively small, probably because hygienic conditions in this hospital were relatively good at the time of the outbreak and because as soon as the epidemic was recognized, Barrier Nursing techniques were used.