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Basalt Fibre

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Tumadhir Merawi Borhan – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • modelling Basalt Fibre reinforced glass concrete slabs at ambient and elevated temperatures
    Materials and Structures, 2014
    Co-Authors: Tumadhir Merawi Borhan, Colin Bailey

    Abstract:

    The analysis of tests conducted on small-scale slabs at ambient and elevated temperatures is presented in this paper. The slabs were produced from a new type of concrete containing different levels of glass sand and Basalt Fibre. Two methods were used for this purpose: a simplified method developed previously and a finite element method, using the software package ABAQUS. For the slabs at ambient temperature, the results showed a good correlation for the load–displacement relationship between the test and the two models up to the failure loads. For the slabs at elevated temperature, the ABAQUS model gave a reasonable prediction for the temperature–displacement relationship while the simplified method gave a conservative prediction for the maximum allowable vertical displacement. As a result, the simplified method underestimated the temperature at which the reinforcement fracture occurs for this type of concrete slab, incorporating glass sand and Basalt Fibres. Further work is required to remove this conservatism from the simplified design method for this type of concrete.

  • structural behaviour of Basalt Fibre reinforced glass concrete slabs
    Materials and Structures, 2014
    Co-Authors: Tumadhir Merawi Borhan, Colin Bailey

    Abstract:

    Small-scale slab tests at ambient and elevated temperatures, conducted on horizontally unrestrained simply supported slabs, are presented in this paper. The aim of this research is to investigate the structural behaviour of concrete produced from different percentages of glass sand (20, 40, and 60 % by weight) and reinforced with different volume fractions of Basalt Fibre (0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 % by total mix volume), when subjected to large vertical displacement. The results were also compared against similar structural members with concrete that did not contain glass or Fibres. The results showed that the fracture of the reinforcement was the mode of failure for all the slabs and the load carrying capacity was enhanced above the theoretical yield-line load. For the slabs tested at elevated temperatures, the enhancement due to membrane action was at least twice as high as that recorded in the ambient temperature tests. The slabs with higher glass sand and Basalt Fibre content also exhibited greater enhancement and failed at higher displacement. The results also showed that the enhancement in the concrete with glass aggregate and Basalt Fibre was greater than that in concrete that contained no glass or Fibre by up to 26 and 31 % at ambient temperature and in fire respectively.

  • properties of glass concrete reinforced with short Basalt Fibre
    Materials & Design, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tumadhir Merawi Borhan

    Abstract:

    Abstract Experimental work was carried out to develop information about the properties of glass aggregate concrete reinforced with chopped Basalt Fibre. Recycled waste mixed colour glass was used as a partial replacement (20%, 40%, and 60% by weight) for the natural fine aggregate with different volume fractions of Fibre (0%, 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% by total mix volume). The combined effect of the glass and the Basalt Fibre on the mechanical properties of the fresh and hardened concrete was investigated. The heat transfer through the thickness for this type of concrete was also investigated. A statistical analysis was also carried out to investigate the variance of the data for each mix. The test results and the statistical analysis indicated that there is a slight reduction in the compressive and splitting tensile strength with the increase in the glass content above 20%. Using Basalt Fibre leads to an enhancement in it for all mixes and there is an optimum content of Fibre in each percentage of glass sand which gives higher strength. A slight decrease in the heat transfer through the concrete specimens was also observed.

Raymond Gilfillan – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Pull-out behaviour of axially loaded Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) rods bonded perpendicular to the grain of glulam elements
    Construction and Building Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: David Yeboah, Su Taylor, Danny Mcpolin, Raymond Gilfillan

    Abstract:

    The behaviour of Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) loaded perpendicular to glulam timber elements was investigated. It was found that pull-out load increased approximately linearly with the bonded length up to maximum which occurred at a bonded length of 250 mm (∼15 times the hole diameter) and did not increase beyond this bonded length. Failure mode of the samples was mostly shear fracture which was located at the cylindrical zone at the timber/adhesive interface. Increased bonded lengths resulted in corresponding decrease in interfacial bond stress. At 250 mm bonded length, the pull-out capacity of the proposed design model was about 2% lower than that of the tests. The results also showed that the bond stress of the theoretical model (at the ascending and descending branches) of the stress-slip curve was approximately 5-10% of that of the experiment. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • pull out behaviour of axially loaded Basalt Fibre reinforced polymer bfrp rods bonded perpendicular to the grain of glulam elements
    Construction and Building Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: David Yeboah, Su Taylor, Danny Mcpolin, Raymond Gilfillan

    Abstract:

    Abstract The behaviour of Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) loaded perpendicular to glulam timber elements was investigated. It was found that pull-out load increased approximately linearly with the bonded length up to maximum which occurred at a bonded length of 250 mm (∼15 times the hole diameter) and did not increase beyond this bonded length. Failure mode of the samples was mostly shear fracture which was located at the cylindrical zone at the timber/adhesive interface. Increased bonded lengths resulted in corresponding decrease in interfacial bond stress. At 250 mm bonded length, the pull-out capacity of the proposed design model was about 2% lower than that of the tests. The results also showed that the bond stress of the theoretical model (at the ascending and descending branches) of the stress–slip curve was approximately 5–10% of that of the experiment.

Su Taylor – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • full scale testing and numerical analysis of a precast Fibre reinforced self compacting concrete slab pre stressed with Basalt Fibre reinforced polymer bars
    Composites Part B-engineering, 2017
    Co-Authors: Bruno Dal Lago, Su Taylor, Peter Deegan, Liberato Ferrara, Mohammed Sonebi, Philip Crosset, Andrea Pattarini

    Abstract:

    Abstract Steel-free pre-stressed reinforced concrete may be used in aggressive environments to increase the durability of structural elements and to limit the carbon footprint by replacing steel with high-strength Fibre composites. The design of a 10-m long steel-free precast Fibre-reinforced concrete slab, pre-stressed with BasaltFibre reinforced polymer (BFRP) bars and shear-reinforced with glass-Fibre reinforced polymer bars, is presented in this paper. Non-linear viscoelastic and elastic-plastic models have been employed for the prediction of the service and ultimate limit state flexural behaviour, respectively. Preliminary tests on the employed materials and a 3-point load test on the slab element are presented, together with indications on its manufacturing process. The proposed numerical analysis is validated against the experimental results.

  • Pull-out behaviour of axially loaded Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) rods bonded perpendicular to the grain of glulam elements
    Construction and Building Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: David Yeboah, Su Taylor, Danny Mcpolin, Raymond Gilfillan

    Abstract:

    The behaviour of Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) loaded perpendicular to glulam timber elements was investigated. It was found that pull-out load increased approximately linearly with the bonded length up to maximum which occurred at a bonded length of 250 mm (∼15 times the hole diameter) and did not increase beyond this bonded length. Failure mode of the samples was mostly shear fracture which was located at the cylindrical zone at the timber/adhesive interface. Increased bonded lengths resulted in corresponding decrease in interfacial bond stress. At 250 mm bonded length, the pull-out capacity of the proposed design model was about 2% lower than that of the tests. The results also showed that the bond stress of the theoretical model (at the ascending and descending branches) of the stress-slip curve was approximately 5-10% of that of the experiment. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • pull out behaviour of axially loaded Basalt Fibre reinforced polymer bfrp rods bonded perpendicular to the grain of glulam elements
    Construction and Building Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: David Yeboah, Su Taylor, Danny Mcpolin, Raymond Gilfillan

    Abstract:

    Abstract The behaviour of Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) loaded perpendicular to glulam timber elements was investigated. It was found that pull-out load increased approximately linearly with the bonded length up to maximum which occurred at a bonded length of 250 mm (∼15 times the hole diameter) and did not increase beyond this bonded length. Failure mode of the samples was mostly shear fracture which was located at the cylindrical zone at the timber/adhesive interface. Increased bonded lengths resulted in corresponding decrease in interfacial bond stress. At 250 mm bonded length, the pull-out capacity of the proposed design model was about 2% lower than that of the tests. The results also showed that the bond stress of the theoretical model (at the ascending and descending branches) of the stress–slip curve was approximately 5–10% of that of the experiment.