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Battered Child Syndrome

The Experts below are selected from a list of 171 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

R M Trueb – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • trichotillomania Battered Child Syndrome
    European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology, 2018
    Co-Authors: R M Trueb

    Abstract:

    (…) Trichotillomania denotes the compulsion to pull one’s own hair. The diagnosis usually is not difficult, but it may take considerable effort to convince the parents of it (3). Battered Child Syndrome denominates any non accidental injury inflicted to a Child usually by a parent, baby-sitter, or guardian. (…)

  • Trichotillomania / Battered Child Syndrome.
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: R M Trueb

    Abstract:

    (…) Trichotillomania denotes the compulsion to pull one’s own hair. The diagnosis usually is not difficult, but it may take considerable effort to convince the parents of it (3). Battered Child Syndrome denominates any non accidental injury inflicted to a Child usually by a parent, baby-sitter, or guardian. (…)

Kip D Nelson – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the misuse of abuse restricting evidence of Battered Child Syndrome
    Law and contemporary problems, 2012
    Co-Authors: Kip D Nelson

    Abstract:

    “We must not allow our abhorrence of an act to become the abhorrence of conscious and deliberate thought and observation in connection with Child abuse.” (1) INTRODUCTION The line between medicine and law has never been exactly bright. Yet when physical violence occurs, it naturally implicates both disciplines. This interdisciplinary blend is particularly evident in the case of Child abuse. Thus, as Child abuse became a recognized phenomenon in medical science, it also became a subject of criminal prosecution. As the scientific definition of Child abuse has expanded, so has its importance in the legal arena. Battered Child Syndrome (BCS), which was originally intended to be a helpful tool for physicians, has evolved into a cunning instrument for prosecutors and a clever trump card for parricide defendants. Since 1962, doctors have been researching Child abuse in the form of BCS. More recently, over the past few decades, both Child abuse prosecutors and homicide defendants have sought to introduce evidence of the Syndrome into the courts. Because of these two distinct and conflicting forms, one might ask, “[W]hich use of Battered Child Syndrome do you believe? Many courts have still not figured this out.” (2) Medical and mental health professionals generally use BCS as a shorthand description of serious abuse. Children who are intentionally harmed by their caretakers are labeled Battered Children. (3) Injuries that may fall within BCS range from minor bruises to fatal skull fractures. (4) Furthermore, the broad Syndrome may also be defined to include the profound psychological effects of abuse. (5) In order to determine the intentionality of the injuries, the repetitive nature of Child abuse is often a particularly important aspect of BCS. (6) However, the original definition of the Syndrome has not been closely adhered to in all cases. Thus, for all the good it can do, the introduction of BCS evidence in some cases is also rife with peril. As one student commentator described it, BCS evidence “is a weapon capable of mischief.” (7) In particular, when BCS is used by prosecutors to mask otherwise impermissible and prejudicial character evidence and by defense attorneys as a justification for homicide, one should worry about its admissibility into the judicial system. In these cases, lawyers have improperly shifted the focus of BCS from the abused Child to the person who is alleged to have caused the abuse. Because prosecutors and defense attorneys are distorting BCS and obfuscating its role in medicine, judges should take care to limit testimony regarding BCS to facts about the abuse itself rather than the abuser. II THE HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OF THE Battered Child Syndrome Child abuse has occurred everywhere for centuries, albeit under different levels of approval. (8) In the West, philosophers such as Aristotle suggested that killing defective Children was wise, and Roman law gave fathers ultimate command over their Children, including control over life and death. (9) Parents in the eighteenth century went so far as to maim their Children so that they could become lucrative beggars or circus exhibits. (10) Even into the twentieth century, Child abuse was generally an unrecognized trauma. (11) In 1962, Dr. C. Henry Kempe and his colleagues published a seminal article on Child abuse and introduced the term “Battered Child Syndrome.” (12) Kempe used the term to describe “a clinical condition in young Children who have received serious physical abuse, generally from a parent or foster parent.” (13) Kempe recognized physicians’ reluctance to consider abuse as the cause of a Child‘s injuries. (14) But he admonished them that “[t]o the informed physician, the bones tell a story the Child is too young or too frightened to tell.” (15) Based on this recognition, Kempe argued that “the physician’s duty and responsibility to the Child requires a full evaluation of the problem and a guarantee that the expected repetition of trauma will not be permitted to occur. …

Jorge Tellez Rodriguez – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Battered Child Syndrome with stomatological repercussions case report
    Revista Odontológica Mexicana, 2016
    Co-Authors: Luis Raziel Martagon Cabrera, Francisco Belmont Laguna, Eduardo De La Teja Angeles, Jorge Tellez Rodriguez

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Battered Child Syndrome is defi ned as all forms of violence, prejudice or physical and mental abuse, carelessness or neglect infl icted on the Child while under the care of his parents, tutors or any other person exerting physical and/or intellectual superiority. In over 50% of all cases lesions are found in the head and neck area. For that reason, dentists, especially pediatric dentists, must be aware to recognize all sorts of battering or neglect based on a suitably-taken clinical history, and focused exploration when suspicion of Battered Child Syndrome is established. Objective: To be knowledgeable with BCS intra- and extra-oral indicators which might allow the pediatric dentist to recognize signs and contribute in the diagnosis as part of a multi-disciplinary team in charge of providing care to this type of patients. Clinical case: A two year, fi ve month old male patient was brought to the National Pediatrics Institute affl icted with peri-orbital edema, multiple limb fractures and oral-facial indicators which suggested Battered Child Syndrome diagnosis. Conclusion: Taking into consideration the frequency with which oral and facial structures are involved in Battered Child Syndrome cases there is a medical, ethical and legal commitment for all dentists and specifi cally pediatric dentists, to intervene in prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment of this medical and social problem.

  • sindrome de nino maltratado con repercusion estomatologica reporte de un caso Battered Child Syndrome with stomatological repercussions case report
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Luis Raziel Martagon Cabrera, Francisco Belmont Laguna, Jorge Tellez Rodriguez

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Battered Child Syndrome is defi ned as all forms of violence, prejudice or physical and mental abuse, carelessness or neglect infl icted on the Child while under the care of his parents, tutors or any other person exerting physical and/or intellectual superiority. In over 50% of all cases lesions are found in the head and neck area. For that reason, dentists, especially pediatric dentists, must be aware to recognize all sorts of battering or neglect based on a suitably-taken clinical history, and focused exploration when suspicion of BCS is established. Objective: To be knowledgeable with Battered Child Syndrome intra- and extra-oral indicators which might allow the pediatric dentist to recognize signs and contribute in the diagnosis as part of a multi-disciplinary team in charge of providing care to this type of patients. Clinical case: A two year, fi ve month old male patient was brought to the National Pediatrics Institute affl icted with peri-orbital edema, multiple limb fractures and oral-facial indicators which suggested Battered Child Syndrome diagnosis. Conclusion: Taking into consideration the frequency with which oral and facial structures are involved in Battered Child Syndrome cases there is a medical, ethical and legal commitment for all dentists and specifi cally pediatric dentists, to intervene in prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment of this medical and social problem. RESUMEN Introduccion: El sindrome de nino maltratado se defi ne como toda forma de violencia, perjuicio o abuso fisico o mental, descuido o trato negligente, mientras el nino se encuentra bajo el cuidado de sus padres, de un tutor o de cualquier otra persona en funcion de su superioridad fisica y/o intelectual. En mas del 50% de los casos las lesiones se presentan en cabeza, cara y cuello. Es por eso que el odontologo y especialmente el odontopediatra deben estar preparados para reconocer alguna forma de maltrato o negligencia con base en una historia clinica adecuada y una exploracion intencionada ante la sospecha de sindrome de nino maltratado. Objetivo: Conocer los indicadores intraorales y extraorales que le permitan al odontopediatra reconocer los signos y contribuir en el diagnostico como parte de un equipo multidisciplinario encargado de la atencion de estos pacientes. Caso clinico: Paciente masculino de dos anos cinco meses quien acude al Servicio de Urgencias del Instituto Nacional de Pediatria por presentar edema periorbitario, multiples fracturas en extremidades e indicadores orofaciales que permitieron diagnosticar sindrome de nino maltratado. Conclusion: Considerando la frecuencia con que las estructuras orofaciales se ven involucradas en el sindrome de nino maltratado, existe un compromiso medico, etico y legal para que todos los dentistas y especifi camente los odontopediatras intervengan en la prevencion, deteccion, diagnostico y tratamiento de este problema medico social.