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Beach Management

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Maribeth L Gidley – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effect of Beach Management policies on recreational water quality
    Journal of Environmental Management, 2018
    Co-Authors: Elizabeth A Kelly, Zhixua Feng, Maribeth L Gidley, Christophe D Sinigalliano, Naresh Kuma, Alliso G Donahue

    Abstract:

    Abstract When Beach water monitoring programs identify poor water quality, the causes are frequently unknown. We hypothesize that Management policies play an important role in the frequency of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) exceedances (enterococci and fecal coliform) at recreational Beaches. To test this hypothesis we implemented an innovative approach utilizing large amounts of monitoring data (n > 150,000 measurements per FIB) to determine associations between the frequency of contaminant exceedances and Beach Management practices. The large FIB database was augmented with results from a survey designed to assess Management policies for 316 Beaches throughout the state of Florida. The FIB and survey data were analyzed using t-tests, ANOVA, factor analysis, and linear regression. Results show that Beach geomorphology (Beach type) was highly associated with exceedance of regulatory standards. Low enterococci exceedances were associated with open coast Beaches (n = 211) that have sparse human densities, no homeless populations, low densities of dogs and birds, bird Management policies, low densities of seaweed, Beach renourishment, charge access fees, employ lifeguards, without nearby marinas, and those that manage storm water. Factor analysis and a linear regression confirmed Beach type as the predominant factor with secondary influences from grooming activities (including seaweed densities and Beach renourishment) and Beach access (including charging fees, employing lifeguards, and without nearby marinas). Our results were observable primarily because of the very large public FIB database available for analyses; similar approaches can be adopted at other Beaches. The findings of this research have important policy implications because the selected Beach Management practices that were associated with low levels of FIB can be implemented in other parts of the US and around the world to improve recreational Beach water quality.

  • spatial and temporal variation in indicator microbe sampling is influential in Beach Management decisions
    Water Research, 2012
    Co-Authors: Ambe A Enns, Maribeth L Gidley, Laura J Vogel, Ami M Abdelzahe, Helena M Sologabriele, Lisa R W Plano, Matthew C Phillips, James S Klaus, Ala M Piggo

    Abstract:

    Fecal indicator microbes, such as enterococci, are often used to assess potential health risks caused by pathogens at recreational Beaches. Microbe levels often vary based on collection time and sampling location. The primary goal of this study was to assess how spatial and temporal variations in sample collection, which are driven by environmental parameters, impact enterococci measurements and Beach Management decisions. A secondary goal was to assess whether enterococci levels can be predictive of the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, a skin pathogen. Over a ten-day period, hydrometeorologic data, hydrodynamic data, bather densities, enterococci levels, and S. aureus levels including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were measured in both water and sand. Samples were collected hourly for both water and sediment at knee-depth, and every 6 h for water at waist-depth, supratidal sand, intertidal sand, and waterline sand. Results showed that solar radiation, tides, and rainfall events were major environmental factors that impacted enterococci levels. S. aureus levels were associated with bathing load, but did not correlate with enterococci levels or any other measured parameters. The results imply that frequencies of advisories depend heavily upon sample collection policies due to spatial and temporal variation of enterococci levels in response to environmental parameters. Thus, sampling at different times of the day and at different depths can significantly impact Beach Management decisions. Additionally, the lack of correlation between S. aureus and enterococci suggests that use of fecal indicators may not accurately assess risk for some pathogens.

P Herreraracionero – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • assessing users expectations and perceptions on different Beach types and the need for diverse Management frameworks along the western mediterranean
    Land Use Policy, 2019
    Co-Authors: C Cabezasrabada, M Rodilla, J E Pardopascual, P Herreraracionero

    Abstract:

    Abstract Beach Management follows a homogeneous and rigid decision-making process that tries to fulfill expectations assumed from mass tourism without really getting to know the real users’ perception. Decisions are usually taken without considering the diversity of values of the Beaches, causing high environmental, economic and recreational impacts. In this study, users’ profiles, expectations and perceptions have been defined on six Valencian Beaches with both different degree of artificialization and sediment type. This has allowed a comparison between semi-natural and urban Beaches, and between pebbly and sandy Beaches. Differences between Beach types have been observed, and a critical analysis of the current Management framework and practices has been carried out. Therefore, decision-making should take greater account of users, and actions should be adapted to the diversity of Beaches and their particularities, leading to a differential Beach Management.

Ala M Piggo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • spatial and temporal variation in indicator microbe sampling is influential in Beach Management decisions
    Water Research, 2012
    Co-Authors: Ambe A Enns, Maribeth L Gidley, Laura J Vogel, Ami M Abdelzahe, Helena M Sologabriele, Lisa R W Plano, Matthew C Phillips, James S Klaus, Ala M Piggo

    Abstract:

    Fecal indicator microbes, such as enterococci, are often used to assess potential health risks caused by pathogens at recreational Beaches. Microbe levels often vary based on collection time and sampling location. The primary goal of this study was to assess how spatial and temporal variations in sample collection, which are driven by environmental parameters, impact enterococci measurements and Beach Management decisions. A secondary goal was to assess whether enterococci levels can be predictive of the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, a skin pathogen. Over a ten-day period, hydrometeorologic data, hydrodynamic data, bather densities, enterococci levels, and S. aureus levels including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were measured in both water and sand. Samples were collected hourly for both water and sediment at knee-depth, and every 6 h for water at waist-depth, supratidal sand, intertidal sand, and waterline sand. Results showed that solar radiation, tides, and rainfall events were major environmental factors that impacted enterococci levels. S. aureus levels were associated with bathing load, but did not correlate with enterococci levels or any other measured parameters. The results imply that frequencies of advisories depend heavily upon sample collection policies due to spatial and temporal variation of enterococci levels in response to environmental parameters. Thus, sampling at different times of the day and at different depths can significantly impact Beach Management decisions. Additionally, the lack of correlation between S. aureus and enterococci suggests that use of fecal indicators may not accurately assess risk for some pathogens.