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Bearing Implant

The Experts below are selected from a list of 237 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ben Luan – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Fabrication of Ti/polymer biocomposites for load-Bearing Implant applications
    Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 2020
    Co-Authors: J F Wang, Ben Luan

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a two-step method for the fabrication of Ti/polymer biocomposites. In the first step, a porous titanium substrate was produced by powder compaction and sintering. The porosity and pore structure of the substrate were controlled by varying the sintering process parameters. In the second step, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or polyurethane (PU) was impregnated into the porous titanium substrate to form Ti/polymer biocomposites with the assistance of a hydraulic pressure. Ti/polymer composites with the polymer volume fraction varying from 21% to 37% have been successfully fabricated. Suitable impregnation parameters such as temperature, pressure and holding time for HDPE and PU were determined.Peer reviewed: YesNRC publication: Ye

  • fabrication of ti polymer biocomposites for load Bearing Implant applications
    Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 2008
    Co-Authors: J F Wang, Ben Luan

    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper presents a two-step method for the fabrication of Ti/polymer biocomposites. In the first step, a porous titanium substrate was produced by powder compaction and sintering. The porosity and pore structure of the substrate were controlled by varying the sintering process parameters. In the second step, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or polyurethane (PU) was impregnated into the porous titanium substrate to form Ti/polymer biocomposites with the assistance of a hydraulic pressure. Ti/polymer composites with the polymer volume fraction varying from 21% to 37% have been successfully fabricated. Suitable impregnation parameters such as temperature, pressure and holding time for HDPE and PU were determined.

Angel L. Díez-vicente – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Nano-TiO2 Reinforced PEEK/PEI Blends as Biomaterials for Load-Bearing Implant Applications
    ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ana M. Díez-pascual, Angel L. Díez-vicente

    Abstract:

    Biocompatible ternary nanocomposites based on poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK)/poly(ether imide) (PEI) blends reinforced with bioactive titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were fabricated via ultrasonication followed by melt-blending. The developed biomaterials were characterized using FT-IR, SEM, XRD, DSC, TGA, and DMA. Further, their water-absorption, tensile, tribological, dielectric, and antibacterial properties were evaluated. PEI acts as a coupling agent, since it can interact both with PEEK via π–π stacking and polar interactions as well as with the nanoparticles through hydrogen bonding, as corroborated by the FT-IR spectra, which resulted in a homogeneous titania dispersion within the biopolymer blend without applying any particle surface treatment or polymer functionalization. A change from promotion to retardation in the crystallization rate of the matrix was found with increasing TiO2 concentration, while its crystalline structure remained unaltered. The nanoparticles stiffened, strengthened,…

  • Nano-TiO2 reinforced PEEK/PEI blends as biomaterials for load-Bearing Implant applications
    ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ana M. Díez-pascual, Angel L. Díez-vicente

    Abstract:

    Biocompatible ternary nanocomposites based on poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK)/poly(ether imide) (PEI) blends reinforced with bioactive titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were fabricated via ultrasonication followed by melt-blending. The developed biomaterials were characterized using FT-IR, SEM, XRD, DSC, TGA, and DMA. Further, their water-absorption, tensile, tribological, dielectric, and antibacterial properties were evaluated. PEI acts as a coupling agent, since it can interact both with PEEK via π-π stacking and polar interactions as well as with the nanoparticles through hydrogen bonding, as corroborated by the FT-IR spectra, which resulted in a homogeneous titania dispersion within the biopolymer blend without applying any particle surface treatment or polymer functionalization. A change from promotion to retardation in the crystallization rate of the matrix was found with increasing TiO2 concentration, while its crystalline structure remained unaltered. The nanoparticles stiffened, strengthened, and toughened the matrix simultaneously, and the optimal properties were achieved at 4.0 wt % TiO2. More interesting, the tensile properties were retained after steam sterilization in an autoclave or exposure to a simulated body fluid (SBF). The nanocomposites also displayed reduced water absorption though higher thermal stability, storage modulus, glass transition temperature, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss compared to the control blend. Further, remarkable enhancements in the tribological properties under both SBF and dry environments were attained. The nanoparticles conferred antibacterial action versus Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the presence and the absence of UV light, and the highest inhibition was attained at 4.0 wt % nanoparticle concentration. These nanocomposites are expected to be used in long-term load-Bearing Implant applications. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

Constantine A. Demetracopoulos – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Sagittal Tibiotalar Alignment May Not Affect Functional Outcomes in Fixed-Bearing Total Ankle Replacement: A Retrospective Cohort Study
    HSS Journal ®, 2019
    Co-Authors: Natalie M. Nielsen, Guilherme H. Saito, Austin E. Sanders, Scott J. Ellis, Carolyn M. Sofka, Constantine A. Demetracopoulos

    Abstract:

    Background In total ankle replacement (TAR), correct positioning of the Implant is crucial. Malposition of the components may increase contact pressures and diminish prosthesis survival. The effect of sagittal tibiotalar alignment on functional outcomes after fixed-Bearing TAR remains unclear, however, and no studies have compared fixed-Bearing Implants with respect to the anteroposterior (AP) position of the talar component. Questions/Purpose The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the effect of sagittal tibiotalar alignment on functional outcomes in fixed-Bearing TAR and (2) to compare post-operative sagittal tibiotalar alignment in two types of fixed-Bearing Implants. Methods In a retrospective analysis of 71 primary TARs performed at a single center, we studied the INBONE™ II Total Ankle System and the Salto Talaris^® Ankle. Radiographic measurements of the tibial axis–talus (T-T) ratio and the AP offset ratio were performed before and after surgery, respectively, and we evaluated Foot and Ankle Outcome Scores (FAOSs) and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) scales pre-operatively and at 2 years after surgery. The Pearson correlation and independent-samples t test were used to evaluate differences in FAOSs, SF-12 MCS scores, and SF-12 PCS scores regarding post-operative sagittal alignment. Results Post-operative sagittal tibiotalar alignment was neutral in 39 ankles and anterior in 32 ankles. We observed no significant between-group differences in clinical outcome scores. Patients with a Salto Talaris Ankle prosthesis had a greater AP offset ratio (0.12) than patients with an INBONE II Implant (0.05). However, the greater translation did not correlate with outcome scores. Conclusion At the 2-year follow-up, no correlation between the post-operative AP offset ratio and functional outcome scores was observed between the two fixed-BearingImplant groups. Further studies with longer follow-up are needed to determine whether the difference in sagittal alignment has an effect on functional outcomes in the long term.

  • Sagittal Tibiotalar Alignment May Not Affect Functional Outcomes in Fixed-Bearing Total Ankle Replacement: A Retrospective Cohort Study
    HSS Journal, 2019
    Co-Authors: Natalie Nielsen, Guilherme H. Saito, Austin E. Sanders, Scott J. Ellis, Carolyn M. Sofka, Constantine A. Demetracopoulos

    Abstract:

    In total ankle replacement (TAR), correct positioning of the Implant is crucial. Malposition of the components may increase contact pressures and diminish prosthesis survival. The effect of sagittal tibiotalar alignment on functional outcomes after fixed-Bearing TAR remains unclear, however, and no studies have compared fixed-Bearing Implants with respect to the anteroposterior (AP) position of the talar component. The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the effect of sagittal tibiotalar alignment on functional outcomes in fixed-Bearing TAR and (2) to compare post-operative sagittal tibiotalar alignment in two types of fixed-Bearing Implants. In a retrospective analysis of 71 primary TARs performed at a single center, we studied the INBONE™ II Total Ankle System and the Salto Talaris® Ankle. Radiographic measurements of the tibial axis–talus (T-T) ratio and the AP offset ratio were performed before and after surgery, respectively, and we evaluated Foot and Ankle Outcome Scores (FAOSs) and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) scales pre-operatively and at 2 years after surgery. The Pearson correlation and independent-samples t test were used to evaluate differences in FAOSs, SF-12 MCS scores, and SF-12 PCS scores regarding post-operative sagittal alignment. Post-operative sagittal tibiotalar alignment was neutral in 39 ankles and anterior in 32 ankles. We observed no significant between-group differences in clinical outcome scores. Patients with a Salto Talaris Ankle prosthesis had a greater AP offset ratio (0.12) than patients with an INBONE II Implant (0.05). However, the greater translation did not correlate with outcome scores. At the 2-year follow-up, no correlation between the post-operative AP offset ratio and functional outcome scores was observed between the two fixed-BearingImplant groups. Further studies with longer follow-up are needed to determine whether the difference in sagittal alignment has an effect on functional outcomes in the long term.