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Bearing Stress

The Experts below are selected from a list of 294 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

F Chevalier – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • rolling Bearing Stress based life part i calculation model
    Journal of Tribology-transactions of The Asme, 2012
    Co-Authors: L Houpert, F Chevalier

    Abstract:

    Rolling contact Bearing life is calculated using Stresses calculated at the surface and in the volume. Surface Stresses account for profile and misalignment as well as asperity deformations. Sub-surface Stresses are calculated beneath the asperities (for defining the life of the surface) and deeper in the volume for calculating the life of the volume. The Stress-life criterion adopted is the Dang Van one in which the local stabilized shear Stress is compared to the material endurance limit defined as a function of the hydrostatic pressure (itself a function of the contact pressure) but also residual Stresses and hoop Stresses (due to fit). A Stress-life exponent c, of the order of 4 (instead of 34/3 in the standard Lundberg and Palmgren model) is used for respecting a local load-life exponent of 10/3 at typical load levels. Life of any circumferential slices of the inner, outer, and roller is defined for obtaining the final Bearing life. Trends showing how the Bearing life varies as a function of the applied Bearing load and Λ ratio (film thickness/RMS roughness height) are given.

  • Rolling Bearing Stress Based Life—Part I: Calculation Model
    Journal of Tribology-transactions of The Asme, 2012
    Co-Authors: L Houpert, F Chevalier

    Abstract:

    Rolling contact Bearing life is calculated using Stresses calculated at the surface and in the volume. Surface Stresses account for profile and misalignment as well as asperity deformations. Sub-surface Stresses are calculated beneath the asperities (for defining the life of the surface) and deeper in the volume for calculating the life of the volume. The Stress-life criterion adopted is the Dang Van one in which the local stabilized shear Stress is compared to the material endurance limit defined as a function of the hydrostatic pressure (itself a function of the contact pressure) but also residual Stresses and hoop Stresses (due to fit). A Stress-life exponent c, of the order of 4 (instead of 34/3 in the standard Lundberg and Palmgren model) is used for respecting a local load-life exponent of 10/3 at typical load levels. Life of any circumferential slices of the inner, outer, and roller is defined for obtaining the final Bearing life. Trends showing how the Bearing life varies as a function of the applied Bearing load and Λ ratio (film thickness/RMS roughness height) are given.

  • Rolling Bearing Stress Based Life—Part II: Experimental Calibration and Validation
    Journal of Tribology-transactions of The Asme, 2012
    Co-Authors: J. Gnagy, L Houpert, F Chevalier

    Abstract:

    The Stress based life model described in Paper I was calibrated using a large database of experimental results from a global quality audit test program as well as special development tests conducted for this validation effort. All tests used in the calibration of the new model were case carburized or through hardened tapered roller Bearings. The initial model comparison to test results showed very good correlation with a median ratio of test life to calculated life very close to one. Higher accuracy of the Stress based model compared to the traditional factor based method was also demonstrated by narrower confidence bands (less data scatter). Validation testing of case carburized tapered roller Bearings as well as through hardened spherical roller Bearings was also conducted under expanded test conditions beyond those utilized in the quality audit test program (i.e., high and low load, high and low λ, imposed misalignment, and heavy inner ring interference fits). Although the median ratio of relative life for the validation testing showed the Stress based method to be conservative and well above one, the Stress based method still showed better accuracy than the traditional factor based method as well as narrower confidence bands for this additional body of experimental data. The conservative results can be explained by use of high quality steel and manufacturing processes in a prototype facility and not series production equipment as was the case with the quality audit database.

L Houpert – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • rolling Bearing Stress based life part i calculation model
    Journal of Tribology-transactions of The Asme, 2012
    Co-Authors: L Houpert, F Chevalier

    Abstract:

    Rolling contact Bearing life is calculated using Stresses calculated at the surface and in the volume. Surface Stresses account for profile and misalignment as well as asperity deformations. Sub-surface Stresses are calculated beneath the asperities (for defining the life of the surface) and deeper in the volume for calculating the life of the volume. The Stress-life criterion adopted is the Dang Van one in which the local stabilized shear Stress is compared to the material endurance limit defined as a function of the hydrostatic pressure (itself a function of the contact pressure) but also residual Stresses and hoop Stresses (due to fit). A Stress-life exponent c, of the order of 4 (instead of 34/3 in the standard Lundberg and Palmgren model) is used for respecting a local load-life exponent of 10/3 at typical load levels. Life of any circumferential slices of the inner, outer, and roller is defined for obtaining the final Bearing life. Trends showing how the Bearing life varies as a function of the applied Bearing load and Λ ratio (film thickness/RMS roughness height) are given.

  • Rolling Bearing Stress Based Life—Part I: Calculation Model
    Journal of Tribology-transactions of The Asme, 2012
    Co-Authors: L Houpert, F Chevalier

    Abstract:

    Rolling contact Bearing life is calculated using Stresses calculated at the surface and in the volume. Surface Stresses account for profile and misalignment as well as asperity deformations. Sub-surface Stresses are calculated beneath the asperities (for defining the life of the surface) and deeper in the volume for calculating the life of the volume. The Stress-life criterion adopted is the Dang Van one in which the local stabilized shear Stress is compared to the material endurance limit defined as a function of the hydrostatic pressure (itself a function of the contact pressure) but also residual Stresses and hoop Stresses (due to fit). A Stress-life exponent c, of the order of 4 (instead of 34/3 in the standard Lundberg and Palmgren model) is used for respecting a local load-life exponent of 10/3 at typical load levels. Life of any circumferential slices of the inner, outer, and roller is defined for obtaining the final Bearing life. Trends showing how the Bearing life varies as a function of the applied Bearing load and Λ ratio (film thickness/RMS roughness height) are given.

  • Rolling Bearing Stress Based Life—Part II: Experimental Calibration and Validation
    Journal of Tribology-transactions of The Asme, 2012
    Co-Authors: J. Gnagy, L Houpert, F Chevalier

    Abstract:

    The Stress based life model described in Paper I was calibrated using a large database of experimental results from a global quality audit test program as well as special development tests conducted for this validation effort. All tests used in the calibration of the new model were case carburized or through hardened tapered roller Bearings. The initial model comparison to test results showed very good correlation with a median ratio of test life to calculated life very close to one. Higher accuracy of the Stress based model compared to the traditional factor based method was also demonstrated by narrower confidence bands (less data scatter). Validation testing of case carburized tapered roller Bearings as well as through hardened spherical roller Bearings was also conducted under expanded test conditions beyond those utilized in the quality audit test program (i.e., high and low load, high and low λ, imposed misalignment, and heavy inner ring interference fits). Although the median ratio of relative life for the validation testing showed the Stress based method to be conservative and well above one, the Stress based method still showed better accuracy than the traditional factor based method as well as narrower confidence bands for this additional body of experimental data. The conservative results can be explained by use of high quality steel and manufacturing processes in a prototype facility and not series production equipment as was the case with the quality audit database.

Hoan Thong Nguyen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A Novel Axial Flux Permanent-Magnet Machine for Flywheel Energy Storage System: Design and Analysis
    IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, 2011
    Co-Authors: Trong Duy Nguyen, King-jet Tseng, Shao Zhang, Hoan Thong Nguyen

    Abstract:

    This paper presents the design and analysis of a novel axial flux permanent-magnet (AFPM) machine for a flywheel energy storage system (FESS). Its design and control facilitate significant reduction in axial Bearing Stress and losses. Due to the unconventional flux distribution in this machine, a 3-D finite element method was employed for its design and analysis, including its electromagnetic torque and axial force performances. The effects of the rotor PM skew angle on the cogging torque and the axial force have been studied. It is found that an optimum skew angle is effective in reducing the overall cogging torque with negligible effect on the static axial force. The latter is crucial as it can be utilized to minimize the axial Bearing Stress in FESS application. The concept, design, and analysis methodology have been validated by experimental results from an experimental AFPM machine prototype.