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Bed Bug Infestation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 117 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Lori Pennington-gray – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bed Bugs bite the hospitality industry? A framing analysis of Bed Bug news coverage
    Tourism Management, 2015
    Co-Authors: Bingjie Liu, Lori Pennington-gray

    Abstract:

    News coverage plays an important role in determining individuals’ travel decisions and influencing the general tourism market. Bed Bug Infestation, as a growing crisis in the hospitality and tourism industry, has been featured in news coverage. This study conducted a framing analysis of news coverage that is pertinent to the Bed Bug crisis and to the hospitality and travel industry. Selected news articles, representing three different destinations, were retrieved from five national newspapers. Results showed that Bed Bug Infestation has been framed as a typical health crisis, with aspects of consequence and seriousness featured. Findings further confirmed the hospitality and travel industry as frequently cited in the Bed Bug news coverage. A positive correlation existed between the mention of the hospitality and travel industry, and the use of either a thematic frame or the news frame consequence. Based on the findings, implications for tourism crisis management were discussed.

  • Using social media in hotel crisis management: the case of Bed Bugs
    Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Bingjie Liu, Lori Pennington-gray, Louisa Klemmer

    Abstract:

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide greater insights into the-state-of-the-art in crisis management and aid in better response to health-related crises, with a specific focus on the hotel industry. This study extends the tourism crisis management model to include social media, concerning the role of monitoring and responding. Design/methodology/approach – This study enhances the classic 4R (readiness, reduction, response and recovery) crisis management model to include social media for hotels facing a Bed Bug crisis and/or other health-related crises. Findings – This paper discusses the use of social media at different phases of managing a Bed Bug crisis, which include risk reduction, readiness, response and recovery. Recommendations are also provided for hotel managers to combat health-related crises that are fought out on social media. Practical implications – Social media has helped to bridge the communication gap between customers and hotels. Bed Bug Infestations are a growing health crisis, and they have obtained increasing attention on social media sites. Without managing this crisis effectively, Bed Bug Infestation can cause economic loss and reputational damages to hotel properties, ranging from negative comments and complaints, to possible lawsuits. Thus, it is essential for hoteliers to understand the importance of social media in crisis communication, and to incorporate social media in hotels’ crisis management plans. Originality/value – This study serves as one of the first attempts in the hospitality field to offer discussions and recommendations on how hotels can manage the Bed Bug crisis and other crises of this kind by incorporating social media into their crisis management practices. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Bingjie Liu – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bed Bugs bite the hospitality industry? A framing analysis of Bed Bug news coverage
    Tourism Management, 2015
    Co-Authors: Bingjie Liu, Lori Pennington-gray

    Abstract:

    News coverage plays an important role in determining individuals’ travel decisions and influencing the general tourism market. Bed Bug Infestation, as a growing crisis in the hospitality and tourism industry, has been featured in news coverage. This study conducted a framing analysis of news coverage that is pertinent to the Bed Bug crisis and to the hospitality and travel industry. Selected news articles, representing three different destinations, were retrieved from five national newspapers. Results showed that Bed Bug Infestation has been framed as a typical health crisis, with aspects of consequence and seriousness featured. Findings further confirmed the hospitality and travel industry as frequently cited in the Bed Bug news coverage. A positive correlation existed between the mention of the hospitality and travel industry, and the use of either a thematic frame or the news frame consequence. Based on the findings, implications for tourism crisis management were discussed.

  • Using social media in hotel crisis management: the case of Bed Bugs
    Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Bingjie Liu, Lori Pennington-gray, Louisa Klemmer

    Abstract:

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide greater insights into the-state-of-the-art in crisis management and aid in better response to health-related crises, with a specific focus on the hotel industry. This study extends the tourism crisis management model to include social media, concerning the role of monitoring and responding. Design/methodology/approach – This study enhances the classic 4R (readiness, reduction, response and recovery) crisis management model to include social media for hotels facing a Bed Bug crisis and/or other health-related crises. Findings – This paper discusses the use of social media at different phases of managing a Bed Bug crisis, which include risk reduction, readiness, response and recovery. Recommendations are also provided for hotel managers to combat health-related crises that are fought out on social media. Practical implications – Social media has helped to bridge the communication gap between customers and hotels. Bed Bug Infestations are a growing health crisis, and they have obtained increasing attention on social media sites. Without managing this crisis effectively, Bed Bug Infestation can cause economic loss and reputational damages to hotel properties, ranging from negative comments and complaints, to possible lawsuits. Thus, it is essential for hoteliers to understand the importance of social media in crisis communication, and to incorporate social media in hotels’ crisis management plans. Originality/value – This study serves as one of the first attempts in the hospitality field to offer discussions and recommendations on how hotels can manage the Bed Bug crisis and other crises of this kind by incorporating social media into their crisis management practices. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Changlu Wang – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effectiveness of Building-Wide Integrated Pest Management Programs for German Cockroach and Bed Bug in a High-Rise Apartment Building
    Journal of Integrated Pest Management, 2019
    Co-Authors: Changlu Wang, Richard Cooper, Amanda L Eiden, Desen Wang

    Abstract:

    Abstract
    Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius (L.) (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), and German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.) (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), Infestations are commonly found in low-income housing communities and result in negative health effects and economic burden. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) has been shown to be an effective approach for managing these pests, yet practice of IPM in housing communities is very limited. We evaluated the effectiveness of a contractor-led Bed Bug IPM program and researcher-led cockroach IPM program in a high-rise apartment building for 1 yr. A second apartment building that received conventional monthly pest control service was used as control. The Bed Bug Infestation rate decreased from 9% at 0 mo to 3% at 12 mo (63% reduction), even though the contractor only partially followed the IPM protocol; the German cockroach Infestation rate decreased from 49% at 0 mo to 12% at 12 mo (75% reduction). In the control building, no monitors were installed in the infested apartments and the apartments received cursory treatment services from an existing pest control contractor. The Bed Bug Infestation rate increased from 6% at 0 mo to 12% at 12 mo (117% increase); the German cockroach Infestation rate decreased from 47% at 0 mo to 29% at 12 mo (39% reduction). IPM is a much more effective approach for building-wide control of cockroaches and Bed Bugs than conventional pest control service. This study confirms the benefit of building-wide IPM on pest reduction and challenges existed for carrying out IPM programs in low-income communities.

  • Accuracy of Trained Canines for Detecting Bed Bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)
    Journal of Economic Entomology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Richard Cooper, Changlu Wang, Narinderpal Singh

    Abstract:

    Detection of low-level Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), Infestations is essential for early intervention, confirming eradication of Infestations, and reducing the spread of Bed Bugs. Despite the importance of detection, few effective tools and methods exist for detecting low numbers of Bed Bugs. Scent dogs were developed as a tool for detecting Bed Bugs in recent years. However, there are no data demonstrating the reliability of trained canines under natural field conditions. We evaluated the accuracy of 11 canine detection teams in naturally infested apartments. All handlers believed their dogs could detect Infestations at a very high rate (≥95%). In three separate experiments, the mean (min, max) detection rate was 44 (10–100)% and mean false-positive rate was 15 (0–57)%. The false-positive rate was positively correlated with the detection rate. The probability of a Bed Bug Infestation being detected by trained canines was not associated with the level of Bed Bug Infestations. Four canine detection teams evaluated on multiple days were inconsistent in their ability to detect Bed Bugs and exhibited significant variance in accuracy of detection between inspections on different days. There was no significant relationship between the team’s experience or certification status of teams and the detection rates. These data suggest that more research is needed to understand factors affecting the accuracy of canine teams for Bed Bug detection in naturally infested apartments.

  • Bed Bug Infestations and Control Practices in China: Implications for Fighting the Global Bed Bug Resurgence
    Insects, 2011
    Co-Authors: Changlu Wang

    Abstract:

    The Bed Bug resurgence in North America, Europe, and Australia has elicited interest in investigating the causes of the widespread and increasing Infestations and in developing more effective control strategies. In order to extend global perspectives on Bed Bug management, we reviewed Bed Bug literature in China by searching five Chinese language electronic databases. We conducted telephone interviews of staff from 77 Health and Epidemic Prevention Stations in six Chinese cities in November 2010. We also conducted telephone interviews of 68 pest control firms in two cities during March 2011. Two species of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus (F.)) are known to occur in China. These were common urban pests before the early1980s. Nationwide “Four-Pest Elimination” campaigns (Bed Bugs being one of the targeted pests) were implemented in China from 1960 to the early 1980s. These campaigns succeeded in the elimination of Bed Bug Infestations in most communities. Commonly used Bed Bug control methods included applications of hot water, sealing of Bed Bug harborages, physical removal, and applications of residual insecticides (mainly organophosphate sprays or dusts). Although international and domestic travel has increased rapidly in China over the past decade (2000–2010), there have only been sporadic new Infestations reported in recent years. During 1999–2009, all documented Bed Bug Infestations were found in group living facilities (military dormitories, worker dormitories, and prisons), hotels, or trains. One city (Shenzhen city near Hong Kong) experienced significantly higher number of Bed Bug Infestations. This city is characterized by a high concentration of migratory factory workers. Current Bed Bug control practices include educating residents, washing, reducing clutter, putting items under the hot sun in summer, and applying insecticides (pyrethroids or organophosphates). There have not been any studies or reports on Bed Bug insecticide resistance. Difficulties of control were noted in our surveys of dormitories in which crowded living, seasonal worker migration, and financial constraints contributed to control failures. This study supports the following conclusions: (1) the Bed Bug Infestation in China dramatically decreased following the campaigns from 1960 to the early 1980s; (2) In our survey of Health and Epidemics Prevention Stations, no Bed Bug cases were reported in Beijing and Shanghai for the past 12 months, but complaints were reported in Guangzhou, Lanzhou, Urumqi, and Shenzhen; (3) Current Bed Bug Infestations primarily are reported in crowded living environments or transient environments such as worker dormitories and military dormitories. These findings suggest that community-wide Bed Bug monitoring and control campaigns are necessary for effective control of Bed Bug Infestations as a societal response.