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Beef Industry

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Andrew Fearne – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the evolution of partnerships in the meat supply chain insights from the british Beef Industry
    Supply Chain Management, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andrew Fearne

    Abstract:

    This case study describes the evolution of supply chain partnerships in the British Beef Industry, driven by changing consumer demand, food safety legislation, a concentrated and highly competitive retail sector and the BSE crisis. The case examples demonstrate the importance of establishing trust in supply chain partnerships, breaking out of the spot trading environment which characterises commodity markets and focusing explicitly on value added initiatives as a source of differentiation and competitive advantage.

  • The evolution of partnerships in the meat supply chain: insights from the British Beef Industry
    Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andrew Fearne

    Abstract:

    The evolution of partnerships in the meat supply chain: insights from the British Beef Industry

Garry R. Griffith – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Distribution of Gains from Cattle Development in a Multi-Stage Production System: The Case of the Bali Beef Industry
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Xueyan Zhao, I Gusti Agung Ayu Ambarawati, Roley R. Piggott, Garry R. Griffith

    Abstract:

    Beef production in Bali is dominated by small-holders, like the majority of Indonesian agriculture. A number of different policies have been implemented to enhance development of this and other parts of the Bali Beef Industry. Knowledge about the returns from these options for the development of the cattle and Beef Industry, and their distribution among producers, consumers and others, would better inform policy decision making. This paper examines the benefits from cattle development in a multi stage production representation of the Bali Beef Industry using equilibrium displacement modelling (EDM). For a 1 per cent exogenous shift in the relevant market, improved productivity of Bali cattle production has the largest total benefits (Rp 3.02 billion, about A$ 0.6 million), over a time horizon of 2-3 years. Bali cattle producers receive a substantial share (35 to 71 per cent) of the total returns from any cost reduction or improved efficiency scenario.

  • The Cost to the Bali Beef Industry of the October 2002 Terrorist Attack
    Australasian Agribusiness Review, 2020
    Co-Authors: I Gusti Agung Ayu Ambarawati, Garry R. Griffith, Xueyan Zhao, Roley R. Piggott

    Abstract:

    The island of Bali is one of the main cattle producing areas for Indonesia. Bali is also known for its extensive tourist sector. Frozen and chilled Beef are imported to fulfil the tourist demand. This imported Beef, most of it from Australia, competes with the local Beef in the tourist sector. The terrorist attack in October 2002 caused the tourist Industry to collapse and this impact has been passed down to the demand for local and imported Beef. The objective of this paper is to use an economic model of the Bali Beef Industry to assess the impact of this attack on the Bali Beef sector. The results show that there is expected to be a significant welfare loss of Rp 5.43 billion (A$ 1.09 million) to the Bali Beef Industry over the medium term. Of this, Bali cattle producers are expected to lose Rp 2.57 billion (47 per cent). The quantity of Bali Beef demanded by the HRI markets is forecast to drop by about 5 per cent, while imported Beef demand is forecast to reduce by about 2 per cent.

  • The US Cattle Cycle and its Influence on the Australian Beef Industry
    Australasian Agribusiness Review, 2020
    Co-Authors: Garry R. Griffith, A. R. Alford

    Abstract:

    Although there is some disagreement about the fi ne detail (see for example the report on Outlook 2002 in The Land, 7 March 2002, p.12), the signposts for the Australian Beef Industry appear to be pointing mainly in the “positive” direction in the short term. How long will this situation last and what can cattle producers, feedlot operators and meat processors do to protect themselves against the inevitable turnaround towards the “negative” direction? In this paper, one of the critical factors infl uencing the longer-term future of the Beef market, the United States (US) cattle cycle, is described and its impacts on Australia are evaluated.

Brian D. Neureuther – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A Comparison of Information Technology in Supply Chains: U.S. Beef Industry and U.S. Food Industry
    Innovations in Supply Chain Management for Information Systems, 2020
    Co-Authors: George N. Kenyon, Brian D. Neureuther

    Abstract:

    Historically, the growth of the Beef Industry has been hampered by the various entities (breeders, cowcalf producers, stockers, backgrounders, processors, etc..) within the Beef Industry’s supply chain. The primary obstacles to growth are the large number of participants in the upstream side of the supply chain and the lack of coordination between them. Over the last decade significant advances have been made in information and communication technologies. Many new companies have been founded to promote these technical advances. This research looks at both the upstream and downstream participants to determine the degree to which information technologies are currently being utilized and the degree to which these new technologies have driven performance improvements in the Beef Industry’s supply chain. We find through our survey that, by and large, the Beef Industry does not use information technologies to their benefit and that the US Beef supply chain is not yet strategically poised to enable the use of these technologies.

  • A Comparison of Information Technology Usage across Supply Chains: A Comparison of the U.S. Beef Industry and the U.S. Food Industry
    International Journal of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management, 2010
    Co-Authors: George N. Kenyon, Brian D. Neureuther

    Abstract:

    Historically, the growth of the Beef Industry has been hampered by various entities, i.e., breeders, cow-calf producers, stockers, backgrounders, processors, etc…, within the Beef Industry’s supply chain. The primary obstacles to growth are the large numbers of participants in the upstream side of the supply chain and the lack of coordination between them. Over the last decade significant advances have been made in information and communication technologies, and many new companies have been founded to promote these technical advances. This research looks at both the upstream and downstream participants to determine the degree to which information technologies are currently being utilized and the degree that these new technologies have driven performance improvements in the Beef Industry’s supply chain. Through surveys, the authors find that the Beef Industry does not use information technologies to their benefit and that the US Beef supply chain is not yet strategically poised to enable the use of these technologies.