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Beneficial Microorganisms

The Experts below are selected from a list of 4143 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Yuanshan Piao – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effects of Beneficial Microorganisms on nutrient removal and excess sludge production in an anaerobic anoxic oxic a2o process for municipal wastewater treatment
    Bioresource Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jing Wang, Kangmin Chon, Kyujung Chae, Yuanshan Piao

    Abstract:

    Abstract The performances of anaerobic-anoxic-oxic processes with (A2O-B) and without (A2O-C) Beneficial Microorganisms were compared to provide valuable insights on how they are affected by changes in the microbial biomass and community composition. Although the A2O-B process showed lower concentrations of mixed liquor suspended solids and mixed liquor volatile suspended solids than the A2O-C process under identical operating conditions, the A2O-B process was more effective for the removal of organic materials and nutrients compared with the A2O-C process. Furthermore, the compressibility and settleability of the activated sludge were significantly better in the A2O-B process than in the A2O-C process due to the enhanced decomposition of extracellular polymeric substances. These results indicated that the inoculation of Beneficial Microorganisms may increase the proportions of Microorganisms in relation to the removal of organic materials, nutrients (i.e., Zoogloea, Dechloromonas, Nitrospira, and Nitrosomonas) and the reduction of the excess sludge (i.e., Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes).

  • Effects of Beneficial Microorganisms on nutrient removal and excess sludge production in an anaerobic-anoxic/oxic (A2O) process for municipal wastewater treatment
    Bioresource Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jing Wang, Kangmin Chon, Kyujung Chae, Yuanshan Piao

    Abstract:

    Abstract The performances of anaerobic-anoxic-oxic processes with (A2O-B) and without (A2O-C) Beneficial Microorganisms were compared to provide valuable insights on how they are affected by changes in the microbial biomass and community composition. Although the A2O-B process showed lower concentrations of mixed liquor suspended solids and mixed liquor volatile suspended solids than the A2O-C process under identical operating conditions, the A2O-B process was more effective for the removal of organic materials and nutrients compared with the A2O-C process. Furthermore, the compressibility and settleability of the activated sludge were significantly better in the A2O-B process than in the A2O-C process due to the enhanced decomposition of extracellular polymeric substances. These results indicated that the inoculation of Beneficial Microorganisms may increase the proportions of Microorganisms in relation to the removal of organic materials, nutrients (i.e., Zoogloea, Dechloromonas, Nitrospira, and Nitrosomonas) and the reduction of the excess sludge (i.e., Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes).

J D Van Elsas – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • colonization of torrefied grass fibers by plant Beneficial Microorganisms
    Applied Soil Ecology, 2009
    Co-Authors: R D Trifonova, V Babini, J Postma, J J M H Ketelaars, J D Van Elsas

    Abstract:

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the colonization of thermally treated (i.e. torrefied) grass fibers (TGFs), a new prospective ingredient of potting soil. Eleven bacterial strains and one fungus, Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15, all isolated from TGF or its extract after inoculation with a soil microbial community, were tested for their ability to colonize TGF. Surprisingly, none of these bacteria were able to directly colonize TGF either as single inoculants or as a consortium. Furthermore, bacterial persistence or growth in TGF was not improved by the addition of nutrients or a surfactant. Only extensive washing of the substrate, presumably removing bacteriostatic or bactericidal compounds, allowed bacterial growth on the fibers. Strikingly, the fungal strain consistently colonized TGF up to high densities (up to 1010 CFU per g dry TGF). Given the unique capacity of this fungus to degrade toxic compounds including phenols, TGF was colonized with it for different periods of time, after which a consortium of seven selected bacterial isolates was added. Co-presence of the fungus, or 3 and 24 h pre-colonization with it, was insufficient to create a habitable environment for the bacterial consortium. However, fungal pre-colonization of minimally 3 days allowed the bacterial consortium to colonize the TGF at numbers up to 109 to 1010 CFU per g dry substrate. The resultant bacterial community consisted of at least four strains, i.e. Pseudomonas putida 15/TGE5, Serratia plymuthica 23/TGE5, Pseudomonas corrugata 31/TGE5, and Methylobacterium radiotolerans 56/TGF10, as shown by PCR of colonies on plates and PCR–DGGE profiling. Two persisters, S. plymuthica 23/TGE5 and P. corrugata 31/TGE5, were highly antagonistic towards several phytopathogenic fungi. Thus, a microbial community with plant-Beneficial potential was established on TGF, provided that the fungus C. ligniaria F/TGF15 first creates habitable space in the matrix.

  • removal of phytotoxic compounds from torrefied grass fibres by plant Beneficial Microorganisms
    FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2008
    Co-Authors: R D Trifonova, J Postma, J J M H Ketelaars, F W A Verstappen, Harro J Bouwmeester, J D Van Elsas

    Abstract:

    We aimed to select Microorganisms colonizing torrefied grass fibres (TGF) and simultaneously reducing the phytotoxicity which appeared after heat treatment of the fibres. Eighty-eight bacterial strains and one fungus, previously isolated from a sequential enrichment experiment on torrefied fibres and extracts, were tested separately for their capacity to decrease phytotoxicity. Eleven of the bacterial strains and the fungus significantly reduced phytotoxicity. These organisms were checked for their ability to grow on agar containing phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, 2-furalaldehyde, pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde and furan-2-methanol as sole carbon sources. The fungus F/TGF15 and the bacterial strain 66/TGF15 were able to grow on all six compounds. Strains 15/TGE5, 23/TGE5, 43/TGE20, 56/TGF10 and 95/TGF15 grew on two to four compounds, and strain 72/TGF15 only on one compound. Strains 31/TGE5, 34/TGE5, 48/TGE20 and 70/TGF15 did not grow on any of the single toxic compounds. GC analyses of torrefied grass extracts (TGE) determined which compounds were removed by the Microorganisms. F/TGF15 was the only isolate depleting phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, 2-dihydrofuranone and pyrrole-2,5-dione-3-ethyl-4-methyl. Strains 15/TGE5, 23/TGE5, 31/TGE5 and 56/TGF10, and the fungus depleted 2-furalaldehyde, 2-furan-carboxaldehyde-5-methyl, pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde, 5-acetoxymethyl-2-furaldehyde and benzaldehyde-3-hydroxy-4-methoxy. These promising candidates for colonizing and simultaneously reducing the phytotoxicity of TGF were affiliated with Pseudomonas putida, Serratia plymuthica, Pseudomonas corrugata, Methylobacterium radiotolerans and Coniochaeta ligniaria.

J M Whipps – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • performance of carrot and onion seed primed with Beneficial Microorganisms in glasshouse and field trials
    Biological Control, 2009
    Co-Authors: Amanda J Bennett, A Mead, J M Whipps

    Abstract:

    Beneficial Microorganisms (Clonostachys rosea IK726, Pseudomonas chlororaphis MA342, Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, Trichoderma harzianum T22 and Trichoderma viride S17a) were successfully applied to carrot and onion seed during a commercial drum priming process. Applied Microorganisms were recovered above the target of at least 1 × 105 cfu g−1 seed following subsequent application of pesticides to the seed according to standard commercial practices of film-coating carrot and pelletting onion seed. Two glasshouse experiments consistently showed that priming improved emergence of carrot seed and that C. rosea IK726 further improved emergence time. Priming improved emergence of onion seed in one glasshouse experiment, but had an unexpected negative effect on emergence in the second experiment, possibly due to the proliferation of an unidentified indigenous microorganism during priming, becoming deleterious in high numbers. In this experiment, the application of Beneficial Microorganisms during priming negated this effect and significantly improved emergence. For each crop, a series of field trials was also carried out over three years, at two different sites each year. Although some positive effects of different seed treatments were seen on emergence or yield in individual field trials, no consistent effects were found for primed or microorganism-treated seed across all sites and years. However, a combined analysis of data for all years and sites indicated that pesticide application did consistently improve emergence and yield for both carrot and onion. This is the first comprehensive study assessing glasshouse and field performance of carrot and onion seed primed with Beneficial Microorganisms during a commercial process of drum priming in the UK.

  • dual application of Beneficial Microorganisms to seed during drum priming
    Applied Soil Ecology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Amanda J Bennett, J M Whipps

    Abstract:

    Five microbial plant growth promoters or biocontrol agents (Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, Pseudomonas sp. AB842, Bacillus subtilis MBI600, Trichoderma harzianum T22 and T. virens G20) were assessed for ability to proliferate on seeds of carrot, parsnip and leek. In small-scale priming systems, both pseudomonads and MBI600 (when applied as cells) at levels between 105 and 106 cfu g−1 seed were able to colonise all seeds at the end of priming (240 h) despite initial poor recovery after addition of the cells in some cases. Pf CHA0 was a particularly aggressive seed coloniser often comprising the total pseudomonad population at the end of priming. Drying the seed after priming resulted in <1 log10 cfu g−1 seed loss for the pseudomonads but greater losses for MBI600 on carrot and leek seed. Application of spores of MBI600 resulted in little loss in cfu g−1 seed following addition of the cells and these levels were maintained throughout the priming period and after drying back. Both T22 and G20 were recovere...