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Berea Sandstone Core

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David A. Dicarlo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • steady state supercritical co2 and brine relative permeability in Berea Sandstone at different temperature and pressure conditions
    Water Resources Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Xiongyu Chen, Amir Kianinejad, David A. Dicarlo

    Abstract:

    We measure steady-state two-phase supercritical CO2-brine relative permeabilities in a 61-cm-long Berea Sandstone Core at three different conditions (40°C and 12.41 MPa, 40°C and 8.27 MPa, and 60°C and 12.41 MPa) under primary drainage. We use pressure taps to obtain pressure drops of individual sections of the Core, and X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to obtain in situ saturation profiles, which together help to mitigate the capillary end effect. We include previously measured relative permeabilities at 20°C and 10.34 MPa, and compare all the data using both an eye-test and a statistical test. We find no appreciable temperature and pressure dependence of CO2 relative permeability within 20-60°C and 8.27-12.41 MPa. We find slight changes in the brine relative permeability between supercritical CO2 conditions (40-60°C and 8.27-12.41 MPa) and the liquid CO2 condition (20°C and 10.34 MPa). The temperature and pressure independence of CO2 relative permeability has been previously recognized and reassured in this work using a capillary-effect-free method. This allows one to use a single CO2 relative permeability curve in modeling two-phase CO2 flow within 20-60°C and 8.27-12.41 MPa.

  • measurements of co2 brine relative permeability in Berea Sandstone using pressure taps and a long Core
    Greenhouse Gases-Science and Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Xiongyu Chen, Amir Kianinejad, David A. Dicarlo

    Abstract:

    We measured CO 2 ‐brine relative permeability by performing five steady‐state primary drainage experiments in a 116 mD Berea Sandstone Core at 20°C and 10.34 MPa. We used a long (60.8 cm) Core and four pressure taps to study and minimize end effects that can plague CO 2 ‐brine relative permeability measurements, and we obtained in situ saturation profiles using a medical X‐ray Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. We found that entrance and exit effects propagated ∼5 cm into the Core, but the center sections of the Core had uniform saturation. From the saturations and pressure drops, we obtained both CO 2 and brine relative permeability in the center sections. We also obtained CO 2 relative permeability at the entrance section where the brine saturation was lower and not uniform. The 15‐cm long exit section of the Core had non‐uniform saturation and a measured pressure drop that was on the order of the capillary pressure and hence was unreliable for calculating relative permeability. We found that the CO 2 and brine relative permeabilities determined in five experiments were consistent with each other and followed two simple Corey‐type models that are similar to those seen in oil‐brine relative permeability measurements. We discuss why end effects are much greater in the CO 2 ‐brine system than in oil‐brine systems, and how this is a possible explanation of the low CO 2 relative permeabilities recently reported for the CO 2 ‐brine systems. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Supercritical CO2 – Brine Primary Drainages (40-60C, 8-12 MPa)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Xiongyu Chen, Shuang Gao, Amir Kianinejad, David A. Dicarlo

    Abstract:

    This project includes porosity images and steady-state water saturation images at 8 different positions (distance from inlet are 4, 12, 20, 28, 37, 44, 52 and 59 cm) along a 60-cm long Berea Sandstone Core (45 mD) during three primary drainage experiments conducted at 40C & 12 MPa, 40C & 8.3 MPa, and 60C & 12 MPa.

    The drainage experiment starts with injecting 1:1 volume ratio of CO2 and brine. After steady state is reached, the water fractional flow (fw) is lowered. This is repeated until 100% CO2 injection. Each drainage experiment has three steps with fw of 0.5, 0.1 and 0.

Xiongyu Chen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • steady state supercritical co2 and brine relative permeability in Berea Sandstone at different temperature and pressure conditions
    Water Resources Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Xiongyu Chen, Amir Kianinejad, David A. Dicarlo

    Abstract:

    We measure steady-state two-phase supercritical CO2-brine relative permeabilities in a 61-cm-long Berea Sandstone Core at three different conditions (40°C and 12.41 MPa, 40°C and 8.27 MPa, and 60°C and 12.41 MPa) under primary drainage. We use pressure taps to obtain pressure drops of individual sections of the Core, and X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to obtain in situ saturation profiles, which together help to mitigate the capillary end effect. We include previously measured relative permeabilities at 20°C and 10.34 MPa, and compare all the data using both an eye-test and a statistical test. We find no appreciable temperature and pressure dependence of CO2 relative permeability within 20-60°C and 8.27-12.41 MPa. We find slight changes in the brine relative permeability between supercritical CO2 conditions (40-60°C and 8.27-12.41 MPa) and the liquid CO2 condition (20°C and 10.34 MPa). The temperature and pressure independence of CO2 relative permeability has been previously recognized and reassured in this work using a capillary-effect-free method. This allows one to use a single CO2 relative permeability curve in modeling two-phase CO2 flow within 20-60°C and 8.27-12.41 MPa.

  • measurements of co2 brine relative permeability in Berea Sandstone using pressure taps and a long Core
    Greenhouse Gases-Science and Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Xiongyu Chen, Amir Kianinejad, David A. Dicarlo

    Abstract:

    We measured CO 2 ‐brine relative permeability by performing five steady‐state primary drainage experiments in a 116 mD Berea Sandstone Core at 20°C and 10.34 MPa. We used a long (60.8 cm) Core and four pressure taps to study and minimize end effects that can plague CO 2 ‐brine relative permeability measurements, and we obtained in situ saturation profiles using a medical X‐ray Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. We found that entrance and exit effects propagated ∼5 cm into the Core, but the center sections of the Core had uniform saturation. From the saturations and pressure drops, we obtained both CO 2 and brine relative permeability in the center sections. We also obtained CO 2 relative permeability at the entrance section where the brine saturation was lower and not uniform. The 15‐cm long exit section of the Core had non‐uniform saturation and a measured pressure drop that was on the order of the capillary pressure and hence was unreliable for calculating relative permeability. We found that the CO 2 and brine relative permeabilities determined in five experiments were consistent with each other and followed two simple Corey‐type models that are similar to those seen in oil‐brine relative permeability measurements. We discuss why end effects are much greater in the CO 2 ‐brine system than in oil‐brine systems, and how this is a possible explanation of the low CO 2 relative permeabilities recently reported for the CO 2 ‐brine systems. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Supercritical CO2 – Brine Primary Drainages (40-60C, 8-12 MPa)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Xiongyu Chen, Shuang Gao, Amir Kianinejad, David A. Dicarlo

    Abstract:

    This project includes porosity images and steady-state water saturation images at 8 different positions (distance from inlet are 4, 12, 20, 28, 37, 44, 52 and 59 cm) along a 60-cm long Berea Sandstone Core (45 mD) during three primary drainage experiments conducted at 40C & 12 MPa, 40C & 8.3 MPa, and 60C & 12 MPa.

    The drainage experiment starts with injecting 1:1 volume ratio of CO2 and brine. After steady state is reached, the water fractional flow (fw) is lowered. This is repeated until 100% CO2 injection. Each drainage experiment has three steps with fw of 0.5, 0.1 and 0.

Xiaochun Li – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • improved vinegar wellington calibration for estimation of fluid saturation and porosity from ct images for a Core flooding test under geologic carbon storage conditions
    Micron, 2019
    Co-Authors: Xiuxiu Miao, Yan Wang, Liwei Zhang, Xiaochun Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract X-ray computed tomography (CT) of fluid flow in formation rocks is an important characterization technique in geologic carbon sequestration research to provide insight into the migration and capillary trapping of CO2 under reservoir conditions. An improved calibration method adapted from traditional Vinegar & Wellington calibration is proposed to map the 3D pore and fluid distributions from the CT images of CO2/brine displacement flooding. Similar to Vinegar & Wellington calibration, the proposed method adopts the linear scaling law of CT number transformation to mass density. However, different from Vinegar & Wellington calibration that uses a 100% brine-saturated Core image and a 100% CO2-saturated Core image as references to calculate CO2 and brine saturations at all time steps, the proposed method uses the CT numbers of CO2 and brine to calculate the incremental of CO2 and brine saturations from time step i to time step i +1. The method is intended for cases in which the two 100% brine saturation and 100% CO2 saturation images can not be successfully obtained. Overall, the improved calibration proposed by this study presents more reasonable results of CO2 and brine distribution in a Berea Sandstone Core, as compared to traditional Vinegar & Wellington calibration. The reconstructed porosity image agrees with the laminated structure of the Berea Sandstone Core, and the average porosity evaluated over the entire Core (0.176) is comparable to the physical porosity (0.165). Furthermore, the reconstructed saturation images using the improved calibration reveal a flat piston-like flooding front from a homogeneous longitudinal-section of the 3D orthogonal view and preferential fingerings from another non-homogeneous longitudinal-section, which are not present in the reconstructed saturation images using traditional Vinegar & Wellington calibration. Concerns and causes with respect to the uncertainty of linear CT number calibration are also explained, and approaches to alleviate the uncertainty are suggested.