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Beta Phellandrene

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Anna Malm – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Comparison of hydrodistillation and headspace solid-phase microextraction techniques for antibacterial volatile compounds from the fruits of Seseli libanotis.
    Natural Product Communications, 2020
    Co-Authors: Krystyna Skalicka-wozniak, Kazimierz Głowniak, Anna Malm

    Abstract:

    : The volatile compounds from the fruits of Seseli libanotis, wild-growing in Poland, were obtained by hydrodistillation (HD) and headspace solid-phase microextraction techniques (HS-SPME) and analyzed using GC-MS. A total of 58 components were identified. The most abundant compounds were sabinen and BetaPhellandrene. MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) and MBC (minimal bactericidal concentration) values for the essential oil against reference bacterial strains and clinical S. aureus isolates were determined. The essential oil showed better antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria (MICs between 0.15 to 1.25 mg/mL) when compared with Gram-negative bacteria (MICs between 1.25 to 2.5 mg/mL). The low values of the MBC/MIC ratio suggest that the examined oil behaved as a bactericidal agent.

  • Volatile compounds in fruits of Peucedanum cervaria (Lap.) L.
    Chemistry & Biodiversity, 2009
    Co-Authors: Krystyna Skalicka-wozniak, Kazimierz Głowniak, Anna Malm

    Abstract:

    : The volatile compounds from Peucedanum cervaria (Lap.) L. were obtained by hydrodistillation (HD) and headspace solid-phase microextraction techniques (HS-SPME), and then analyzed by GC/MS methods. The composition of samples from a botanical garden was compared with plants collected in the wild. The main compounds of the essential oils of P. cervaria were identified as alpha-pinene, sabinene, and Beta-pinene (more than 80% of oil). The content of Beta-myrcene, limonene+BetaPhellandrene, and germacrene D was higher than 1%. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by the agar dilution method against ten reference strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

Hamzeh Amiri – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Chemical constituents of the essential oils of different stages of the growth of Stachys lavandulifolia Vahl. from Iran.
    Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences, 2007
    Co-Authors: Mohammad Hadi Meshkatalsadat Esmat Sajjadi, Hamzeh Amiri

    Abstract:

    : The essential oil of the aerial parts of different stages of growth as pre-flowering, flowering and post flowering of Stachys lavandulifolia Vahl (Lamiaceae) were isolated by hydro distillation. The chemical composition of volatile oil was analyzed by capillary GC and GC/MS. The main components were found to be: alpha-pinene) 27.25, 25.66, 8.52%), myrcene (17.33, 9.33, 23.85%), BetaPhellandrene (21.96, 37.49, 12.58%), Beta-caryophylene (14.3, 8.38, 16.86%).

Richard A. Werner – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Toxicity and Repellency of 4–Allylanisole and Monoterpenes from White Spruce and Tamarack to the Spruce Beetle and Eastern Larch Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)
    Environmental Entomology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Werner

    Abstract:

    Monoterpenes found in the oleoresin of white spruce, Picea glauca (Moench) Voss, and tamarack, Larix laricina (DuRoi) K. Koch, and 4-allylanisole (= estragole, methyl chavicol) were bioassayed for their toxicity to adult spruce beetles, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby), and adult eastern larch beetles, D. simplex LeConte. Limonene and 4-allylanisole at 20 ppm were most toxic to spruce beetles at 24 h; whereas, limonene, myrcene, Beta Phellandrene, and 4-allylanisole were most toxic to eastern larch beetles. Limonene and 4-allylanisole caused 100% mortality to spruce beetle adults exposed to 80 ppm for 24 h. In comparison, limonene, 4-allylanisole, myrcene, and Beta Phellandrene caused 88-98% mortality to eastern larch beetles exposed to 80 ppm for 24 h. In field tests, limonene, 4-allylanisole, myrcene, and Beta Phellandrene inhibited the response of the spruce beetle to frontalin; whereas, myrcene and limonene inhibited the response of the eastern larch beetle to seudenol. Limonene, myrcene, and Beta Phellandrene were found in greater quantities in the wound tissues surrounding the induced reaction zones of white spruce and tamarack than in unwounded tissues which indicates the presence of an induced defensive system. Defoliated tamarack trees responded with increased levels of limonene in the oleoresin during the first 2 yr of successive defoliation, but these levels decreased during the first and 4th yr of successive defoliation. Limonene and 4-allylanisole were the most toxic and inhibitory monoterpenes tested in this study

  • Response of lutz, sitka, and white spruce to attack by Dendroctonus rufipennis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and blue stain fungi
    Environmental Entomology, 1994
    Co-Authors: Richard A. Werner, Barbara L. Illman

    Abstract:

    Mechanical wounding and wounding plus inoculation with a blue-stain fungus, Leptographium abietinum (Peck), associated with the spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby), caused an induced reaction zone or lesion around the wound sites in Lutz spruce, Picea lutzii Little, Sitka spruce, P. sitchensis (Bong.) Carr., and white spruce, P. glauca (Moench) Voss, in south-central Alaska. The effects of tree species on lesion length were nonsignificant; however, the effects of wounding versus wounding plus blue-stain inoculate were highly significant. Lesion length was significantly longer in high-flow Lutz spruce compared with low-flow trees that were wounded. There was a significant change in monoterpene composition in the induced reaction zones of wounded phloem compared with unwounded phloem. The total percentage of potential toxic monoterpenes such as limonene, myrcene, 3-carene, and Beta Phellandrene increased in all three host species. Egg gallery length and the area of phloem consumed by larvae outside of lesions was significantly less for trees with wounds caused by fungal inoculation compared with mechanical wounds only. Trees with fungal inoculations appeared to deter larval feeding. Hydroxystilbenes were not found in the three species of spruce; however, differences were found in the chemical content of the reaction and the nonreaction zones. Two unknown chemicals present in nonreaction zones were not found in the induced reaction zone. One chemical appears to be a dimer with a carbohydrate moeity. A low molecular weight chemical found in the induced reaction zone could not be identified by mass spectroscopy.