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Binary Encoding

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Joseph Jaja – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • An on-line variable-length Binary Encoding of text
    Information Sciences, 1996
    Co-Authors: Tinku Acharya, Joseph Jaja

    Abstract:

    Abstract We present a methodology for on-line variable-length Binary Encoding of a dynamically growing set of integers. Our Encoding maintains the prefix property that enables unique decoding of a string of integers from the set. In order to develop the formalism of this on-line Binary Encoding, we define a unique Binary tree data structure called the “phase in Binary tree.” To show the utility of this on-line variable-length Binary Encoding, we apply this methodology to encode the pointers generated by the LZW algorithm. The experimental results obtained illustrate the superior performance of our algorithm compared to the most widely used algorithms. This on-line variable-length Binary Encoding can be applied in other dictionary-based text compression schemes as well to effectively encode the output pointers to enhance the compression ratio.

  • Data Compression Conference – Enhancing Lempel-Ziv codes using an on-line variable length Binary Encoding
    Proceedings of Data Compression Conference – DCC '96, 1996
    Co-Authors: Tinku Acharya, Joseph Jaja

    Abstract:

    Summary form only given. The LZW algorithm is the most popular dictionary-based adaptive text compression scheme [Welch 1984]. In the LZW algorithm, a changing dictionary contains common strings that have been encountered so far in the text. The motivation for the present research is to explore an on-line variable-length Binary Encoding. We apply this Encoding to LZW codes for remedy of the problem that we discussed in Acharya and Mukherjee [1995]. We call it the LZWAJ algorithm.

  • Enhancing Lempel-Ziv codes using an on-line variable length Binary Encoding
    Proceedings of Data Compression Conference – DCC '96, 1996
    Co-Authors: Tinku Acharya, Joseph Jaja

    Abstract:

    Summary form only given. The LZW algorithm is the most popular dictionary-based adaptive text compression scheme [Welch 1984]. In the LZW algorithm, a changing dictionary contains common strings that have been encountered so far in the text. The motivation for the present research is to explore an on-line variable-length Binary Encoding. We apply this Encoding to LZW codes for remedy of the problem that we discussed in Acharya and Mukherjee [1995]. We call it the LZWAJ algorithm.

R. Van De Walle – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Enhancing RSS feeds: eliminating overhead through Binary Encoding
    Third International Conference on Information Technology and Applications (ICITA'05), 2005
    Co-Authors: R. De Sutter, S. Lerouge, D. De Schrijver, R. Van De Walle

    Abstract:

    While RSS feeds increase in popularity as a mean to stay up to date with the most recent changes on a Web site, its XML representation is causing bandwidth related problems. These issues relate to the verbosity and the indivisible nature of the XML language. As such, bandwidth is wasted twofold as: (1) an RSS feed has no compact representation due to the plain text XML representation; and (2) previously received information about the RSS feed is discarded every time the RSS viewer retrieves the feed. Compression (Binary Encoding) of the XML data becomes relevant to eliminate the overhead. In this paper, we demonstrate the usefulness of the MPEG-7 Binary format for metadata to address both overhead issues. We validate its usability in a typical RSS scenario by calculating the byte size reduction and by comparing the processing speed of creating and parsing Binary encoded RSS feeds to traditional RSS feeds.

  • ICITA (1) – Enhancing RSS feeds: eliminating overhead through Binary Encoding
    Third International Conference on Information Technology and Applications (ICITA'05), 2005
    Co-Authors: R. De Sutter, S. Lerouge, D. De Schrijver, R. Van De Walle

    Abstract:

    While RSS feeds increase in popularity as a mean to stay up to date with the most recent changes on a Web site, its XML representation is causing bandwidth related problems. These issues relate to the verbosity and the indivisible nature of the XML language. As such, bandwidth is wasted twofold as: (1) an RSS feed has no compact representation due to the plain text XML representation; and (2) previously received information about the RSS feed is discarded every time the RSS viewer retrieves the feed. Compression (Binary Encoding) of the XML data becomes relevant to eliminate the overhead. In this paper, we demonstrate the usefulness of the MPEG-7 Binary format for metadata to address both overhead issues. We validate its usability in a typical RSS scenario by calculating the byte size reduction and by comparing the processing speed of creating and parsing Binary encoded RSS feeds to traditional RSS feeds.

Klaus Pawelzik – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • second order phase transition in neural rate coding Binary Encoding is optimal for rapid signal transmission
    Physical Review Letters, 2003
    Co-Authors: Matthias Bethge, David Rotermund, Klaus Pawelzik

    Abstract:

    : Here, we derive optimal tuning functions for minimum mean square reconstruction from neural rate responses subjected to Poisson noise. The shape of these tuning functions strongly depends on the length T of the time window within which action potentials (spikes) are counted in order to estimate the underlying firing rate. A phase transition towards pure Binary Encoding occurs if the maximum mean spike count becomes smaller than approximately three. For a particular function class, we prove the existence of a second-order phase transition. The analytically derived critical decoding time window length is in precise agreement with numerical results. Our analysis reveals that Binary rate Encoding should dominate in the brain wherever time is the critical constraint.