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Binge Drinking

The Experts below are selected from a list of 21105 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Chong Myung Kang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • bilateral renal cortical necrosis following Binge Drinking
    Alcohol and Alcoholism, 2012
    Co-Authors: Yeon Soon Jung, Ho Sik Shin, Kiseok Jang, Moon Hyang Park, Joon Sung Park, Chong Myung Kang

    Abstract:

    Renal cortical necrosis (RCN) is a rare cause of acute kidney injury secondary to ischemic necrosis of the renal cortex. Acute tubular necrosis after Binge Drinking is usually attributed to volume depletion, idiosyncratic reaction to alcohol, rhabdomyolysis or a combination with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Binge Drinking itself as a cause of RCN has not yet been reported. We report a case of a 25-year-old Asian male who developed bilateral RCN following Binge Drinking.

  • clinical aspects bilateral renal cortical necrosis following Binge Drinking
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Yeon Soon Jung, Ho Sik Shin, Kiseok Jang, Moon Hyang Park, Joon Sung Park, Chong Myung Kang

    Abstract:

    Renal cortical necrosis (RCN) is a rare cause of acute kidney injury secondary to ischemic necrosis of the renal cortex. Acute tubular necrosis after Binge Drinking is usually attributed to volume depletion, idiosyncratic reaction to alcohol, rhabdomyoly- sis or a combination with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Binge Drinking itself as a cause of RCN has not yet been reported. We report a case of a 25-year-old Asian male who developed bilateral RCN following Binge Drinking.

Timothy S Naimi – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Binge Drinking intensity: a comparison of two measures
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2012
    Co-Authors: Marissa B. Esser, Robert D Brewer, Dafna Kanny, Timothy S Naimi

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Binge Drinking (≥4 drinks for women; ≥5 drinks for men, per occasion) is responsible for more than half of the estimated 80,000 U.S. deaths annually and three-quarters of the $223.5 billion in costs in 2006. Binge Drinking prevalence is assessed more commonly than Binge Drinking intensity (i.e., number of drinks consumed per Binge episode). Risk of Binge Drinking-related harm increases with intensity, and thus it is important to monitor. The largest number of drinks consumed is assessed in health surveys, but its usefulness for assessing Binge intensity is unknown. PURPOSE: To assess the agreement between two potential measures of Binge Drinking intensity: the largest number of drinks consumed by Binge drinkers (maximum-drinks) and the total number of drinks consumed during their most recent Binge episode (drinks-per-Binge). METHODS: Data were analyzed from 7909 adult Binge drinkers from 14 states responding to the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Binge Drinking module. Mean and median drinks-per-Binge from that module were compared to mean and median maximum-drinks. Analyses were conducted in 2010-2011. RESULTS: Mean (8.2) and median (5.9) maximum-drinks were strongly correlated with mean (7.4) and median (5.4) drinks-per-Binge (r=0.57). These measures were also strongly correlated across most sociodemographic and Drinking categories overall and within states. CONCLUSIONS: The maximum-drinks consumed by Binge drinkers is a practical method for assessing Binge Drinking intensity and thus can be used to plan and evaluate Community Guide-recommended strategies for preventing Binge Drinking (e.g., increasing the price of alcoholic beverages and regulating alcohol outlet density). Language: en

  • Driving After Binge Drinking
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Timothy S Naimi, David E. Nelson, Robert D Brewer

    Abstract:

    Background Although Binge Drinking is strongly associated with alcohol-impaired driving, little is known about the prevalence of or risk factors for driving after Binge Drinking. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of, and risk factors for, driving during or shortly after a specific Binge Drinking episode. Methods The data were analyzed in 2007 and 2008 from 14,085 adults from 13 states in 2003 and 14 states in 2004 who reported Binge Drinking and answered an additional series of questions about Binge Drinking behaviors as part of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Binge Drinking was defined as the consumption of five or more drinks during a Drinking occasion. Results Overall, 11.9% of Binge drinkers drove during or within 2 hours of their most recent Binge Drinking episode. Those Drinking in licensed establishments (bars, clubs, and restaurants) accounted for 54.3% of these driving episodes. Significant independent risk factors for driving after Binge Drinking included male gender (AOR=1.75); being aged 35–54 or ≥55 years compared to 18–34 years (AOR=1.58 and 2.37, respectively); and Drinking in bars or clubs compared to Drinking in the respondent’s home (AOR=7.81). Drivers who drank most of their alcohol in licensed establishments consumed an average of 8.1 drinks, and 25.7% of them consumed ≥10 drinks. Conclusions Because Binge Drinking and subsequent driving were common in establishments licensed to sell alcohol, and because licensing is conditional on responsible beverage service practices (i.e., not selling to intoxicated people), efforts to prevent impaired driving should focus on enforcing responsible beverage service in licensed establishments.

  • Binge Drinking among u s active duty military personnel
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Mandy Stahre, Robert D Brewer, Vincent P Fonseca, Timothy S Naimi

    Abstract:

    Background Binge Drinking (Drinking on a single occasion ≥5 drinks for men or ≥4 drinks for women) is a common risk behavior among U.S. adults that is associated with many adverse health and social consequences. However, little is known about Binge Drinking among active-duty military personnel (ADMP). The objectives of this study were to quantify episodes of Binge Drinking, to characterize ADMP who Binge-drink, and to examine the relationship between Binge Drinking and related harms. Methods The prevalence of Binge Drinking and related harms was assessed from responses to the 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel ( n= 16,037), an anonymous, self-administered survey. The data were analyzed in 2007 after the release of the public-use data. Results In 2005, a total of 43.2% of ADMP reported past-month Binge Drinking, resulting in 29.7 episodes per person per year. In all, 67.1% of Binge episodes were reported by personnel aged 17–25 years (46.7% of ADMP), and 25.1% of these episodes were reported by underage youth (aged 17–20 years). Heavy drinkers (19.8% of ADMP) were responsible for 71.5% of the BingeDrinking episodes and had the highest number of annual per-capita episodes of Binge Drinking (112.6 episodes). Compared to nonBinge drinkers, Binge drinkers were more likely to report alcohol-related harms, including job performance problems (AOR=6.5; 95% CI=4.65, 9.15); alcohol-impaired driving (AOR=4.9; 95% CI=3.68, 6.49); and criminal justice problems (AOR=6.2; 95% CI=4.00, 9.72). Conclusions Binge Drinking is common among ADMP and is strongly associated with adverse health and social consequences. Effective interventions (e.g., the enforcement and retainment of the minimum legal Drinking age) to prevent Binge Drinking should be implemented across the military and in conjunction with military communities to discourage Binge Drinking.

Henry Wechsler – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The State Sets the Rate: The Relationship Among State-Specific College Binge Drinking, State Binge Drinking Rates, and Selected State Alcohol Control Policies
    American Journal of Public Health, 2005
    Co-Authors: Toben F Nelson, Robert D Brewer, Timothy S Naimi, Henry Wechsler

    Abstract:

    Objectives. We assessed the relationship between college Binge Drinking, Binge Drinking in the general population, and selected alcohol control policies.Methods. We analyzed Binge Drinking rates from 2 national surveys, the Har-vard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Binge Drinking data were linked to a summary measure of 7 salient alcohol control policies and a rating of resources devoted to law enforcement.Results. State-level college and adult Binge Drinking rates were strongly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient=0.43; P

  • the state sets the rate the relationship among state specific college Binge Drinking state Binge Drinking rates and selected state alcohol control policies
    American Journal of Public Health, 2005
    Co-Authors: Toben F Nelson, Robert D Brewer, Timothy S Naimi, Henry Wechsler

    Abstract:

    Objectives. We assessed the relationship between college Binge Drinking, Binge Drinking in the general population, and selected alcohol control policies.Methods. We analyzed Binge Drinking rates from 2 national surveys, the Har-vard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Binge Drinking data were linked to a summary measure of 7 salient alcohol control policies and a rating of resources devoted to law enforcement.Results. State-level college and adult Binge Drinking rates were strongly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient=0.43; P<.01). Attending college in states with the lowest Binge Drinking rates (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.41, 0.97) and presence of more stringent alcohol control policies (adjusted OR=0.57; 95% CI=0.33, 0.97) were independent predictors of student Binge Drinking, after adjusting for state law enforcement and individual-, college-, and state-le…

  • college students define Binge Drinking and estimate its prevalence results of a national survey
    Journal of American College Health, 2000
    Co-Authors: Henry Wechsler

    Abstract:

    Abstract Data from the 1999 College Alcohol Study were used to examine how students define the term Binge Drinking, to determine how much Binge Drinking the students think exists on their campuses, and to analyze how students’ estimates compare with aggregated self-reports of student Drinking. The findings indicate that the median of the students’ definitions of Binge Drinking is 6 drinks in a row for men and 5 for women, 1 drink higher than the definition used by researchers. Students’ definitions of Binge Drinking vary with their own Drinking levels, suggesting that dissenting views of the research definition may represent voices of the heaviest drinkers. At the median, students estimated that 35% of all students were Binge drinkers. Half (47%) of the students underestimated the Binge Drinking rate at their school, 29% over-estimated it, and 13% were accurate. Although programs designed to reduce the frequency or prevalence of Binge Drinking by emphasizing healthier norms would be most useful in address…