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Biobased Products

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1422 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Bruce E Dale – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • regional variations in greenhouse gas emissions of Biobased Products in the united states corn based ethanol and soybean oil
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2009
    Co-Authors: Bruce E Dale

    Abstract:

    Background, aim, and scope
    Regional variations in the environmental impacts of plant biomass production are significant, and the environmental impacts associated with feedstock supply also contribute substantially to the environmental performance of Biobased Products. Thus, the regional variations in the environmental performance of Biobased Products are also significant. This study scrutinizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with two Biobased Products (i.e., ethanol and soybean oil) whose feedstocks (i.e., corn and soybean) are produced in different farming locations.

  • Regional variations in greenhouse gas emissions of Biobased Products in the United States—corn-based ethanol and soybean oil
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2009
    Co-Authors: Bruce E Dale

    Abstract:

    Background, aim, and scope
    Regional variations in the environmental impacts of plant biomass production are significant, and the environmental impacts associated with feedstock supply also contribute substantially to the environmental performance of Biobased Products. Thus, the regional variations in the environmental performance of Biobased Products are also significant. This study scrutinizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with two Biobased Products (i.e., ethanol and soybean oil) whose feedstocks (i.e., corn and soybean) are produced in different farming locations.

  • cumulative energy and global warming impact from the production of biomass for Biobased Products
    Journal of Industrial Ecology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Bruce E Dale

    Abstract:

    Summary

    The cumulative energy and global warming impacts associated with producing corn, soybeans, alfalfa, and switchgrass and transporting these crops to a central crop processing facility (called a “biorefinery”) are estimated. The agricultural inputs for each crop are collected from seven states in the United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The cumulative energy requirement for producing and transporting these crops is 1.99 to 2.66 megajoules/kilo-gram (MJ/kg) for corn, 1.98 to 2.04 MJ/kg for soybeans, 1.24 MJ/kg for alfalfa, and 0.97 to 1.34 MJ/kg for switchgrass. The global warming impact associated with producing biomass is 246 to 286 grams (g) CO2 equivalent/kg for corn, 159 to 163gCO2 equivalent/kg for soybeans, 89 g CO2 equivalent/ kg for alfalfa, and 124 to 147 g CO2 equivalent/kg for switch-grass. The detailed agricultural data are used to assess previous controversies over the energy balance of bioethanol and, in light of the ongoing debates on this topic, provide a needed foundation for future life-cycle assessments.

Gene R. Petersen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Technology development for the production of Biobased Products from biorefinery carbohydrates—the US Department of Energy’s “Top 10” revisited
    Green Chemistry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Joseph J. Bozell, Gene R. Petersen

    Abstract:

    A biorefinery that supplements its manufacture of low value biofuels with high value Biobased chemicals can enable efforts to reduce nonrenewable fuel consumption while simultaneously providing the necessary financial incentive to stimulate expansion of the biorefining industry. However, the choice of appropriate Products for addition to the biorefinery’s portfolio is challenged by a lack of broad-based conversion technology coupled with a plethora of potential targets. In 2004, the US Department of Energy (DOE) addressed these challenges by describing a selection process for chemical Products that combined identification of a small group of compounds derived from biorefinery carbohydrates with the research and technology needs required for their production. The intent of the report was to catalyze research efforts to synthesize multiple members of this group, or, ideally, structures not yet on the list. In the six years since DOE’s original report, considerable progress has been made in the use of carbohydrates as starting materials for chemical production. This review presents an updated evaluation of potential target structures using similar selection methodology, and an overview of the technology developments that led to the inclusion of a given compound. The list provides a dynamic guide to technology development that could realize commercial success through the proper integration of biofuels with Biobased Products.

  • technology development for the production of Biobased Products from biorefinery carbohydrates the us department of energy s top 10 revisited
    Green Chemistry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Joseph J. Bozell, Gene R. Petersen

    Abstract:

    A biorefinery that supplements its manufacture of low value biofuels with high value Biobased chemicals can enable efforts to reduce nonrenewable fuel consumption while simultaneously providing the necessary financial incentive to stimulate expansion of the biorefining industry. However, the choice of appropriate Products for addition to the biorefinery’s portfolio is challenged by a lack of broad-based conversion technology coupled with a plethora of potential targets. In 2004, the US Department of Energy (DOE) addressed these challenges by describing a selection process for chemical Products that combined identification of a small group of compounds derived from biorefinery carbohydrates with the research and technology needs required for their production. The intent of the report was to catalyze research efforts to synthesize multiple members of this group, or, ideally, structures not yet on the list. In the six years since DOE’s original report, considerable progress has been made in the use of carbohydrates as starting materials for chemical production. This review presents an updated evaluation of potential target structures using similar selection methodology, and an overview of the technology developments that led to the inclusion of a given compound. The list provides a dynamic guide to technology development that could realize commercial success through the proper integration of biofuels with Biobased Products.

Pierre-sylvain Mirade – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • toward the design of functional foods and Biobased Products by 3d printing a review
    Trends in Food Science and Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Stéphane Portanguen, Pascal Tournayre, Jason Sicard, Thierry Astruc, Pierre-sylvain Mirade

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background 3D printing or additive manufacturing (AM) now provides enormous freedom to design, manufacture and innovate in various domains, even in foodstuffs development. Given the immense potential applications related to AM, many authors are even talking about a new industrial revolution. Scope and approach In this article, we review the state of the science in applied AM methods for developing Biobased Products in the medical and food sectors, with these two sectors having similar points. We were therefore interested in the technological locks encountered in the various studies carried out on the subject. Consideration has also been given to the possibility of using alternative sources of protein, such as animal by-Products, to address resource management and sustainable development issues. One of the strengths of 3D printing is personalization, so we chose to evaluate the impact of this technology on target populations and evaluate the possible evolutions. Key findings and conclusions In order to design food in optimal conditions, the development of new 3D printers is fundamental 1) to ensure the sanitary quality (both microbiological and chemical) of these Products, and 2) to control the structure and texture of these 3D-printed foods. From there, it will be possible to propose personalized foods, adapted to different categories of population (e.g. seniors or young people …). The major challenge in the next years will be to develop, using 3D printing, meat Products or Products blending alternative protein sources that remain perfectly structured without having to use additives. The final step will be to garner consumer acceptance for these 3D-printed foods.

  • Toward the design of functional foods and Biobased Products by 3D printing: A review
    Trends in Food Science and Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Stéphane Portanguen, Pascal Tournayre, Jason Sicard, Thierry Astruc, Pierre-sylvain Mirade

    Abstract:

    Toward the design of functional foods and Biobased Products by 3D printing: A review

  • toward the design of functional foods and Biobased Products by 3d printing
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Stéphane Portanguen, Pascal Tournayre, Jason Sicard, Thierry Astruc, Pierre-sylvain Mirade

    Abstract:

    3D printing now provides enormous freedom to design, manufacture and innovate in a whole number of sector spaces, including medical and food sectors. Here, we analyze the applications developed on the back of these methods, targeting the impact these methods have on the design and production-line sustainability of the Biobased Products per se and on consumer acceptability of these 3D-printed Products. We also look at 3D-printed functional foods targeting different sectors of the population, and the development prospects for 3D-printed Biobased Products in the coming decade. 3D printing is a technology with a bright future. Providing custom-tailored turnkey nutritional solutions to populations that have thus far been excluded from certain markets due to their health conditions, deprived of regular access to food resources, or simply too short of buying power, represents a series of issues that can be overcome. The major challenge for the coming years will be to develop, using 3D printing, meat Products or Products blending alternative protein sources that remain perfectly structured without having to use additives. The final step will be to garner consumer acceptance for these 3D-printed foods.