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Biodegradation Property

The Experts below are selected from a list of 63 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Guangyu Li – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • improvement of the Biodegradation Property and biomineralization ability of magnesium hydroxyapatite composites with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and hydroxyapatite coatings
    ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, 2016
    Co-Authors: Yingchao Su, Dayong Li, Yichang Su, Chengjia Lu, Jianshe Lian, Guangyu Li

    Abstract:

    The application of calcium phosphate reinforced magnesium matrix composites has not achieved the expected effect to control the degradation rate of magnesium so far. Therefore, in order to enhance the corrosion resistance and further develop the surface bioactivity of the composites to meet specific requirements of bone tissue engineering applications, biocompatible dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings have been deposited on homemade HA/Mg composites using a simple conversion coating method and a subsequent alkali post-treatment, respectively. The conversion coating mechanism was studied by comparing coating processes on the composites, pure Mg, and an AZ60 Mg alloy. Electrochemical results showed that polarization resistance of the optimum DCPD and HA coatings was about 15 and 65 times higher than that of the composites, respectively. Immersion tests in simulated body fluid revealed that both coatings could supply improved corrosion resistance and biomineralization abilit…

  • Improvement of the Biodegradation Property and Biomineralization Ability of Magnesium–Hydroxyapatite Composites with Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate and Hydroxyapatite Coatings
    ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, 2016
    Co-Authors: Yingchao Su, Dayong Li, Yichang Su, Chengjia Lu, Jianshe Lian, Guangyu Li

    Abstract:

    The application of calcium phosphate reinforced magnesium matrix composites has not achieved the expected effect to control the degradation rate of magnesium so far. Therefore, in order to enhance the corrosion resistance and further develop the surface bioactivity of the composites to meet specific requirements of bone tissue engineering applications, biocompatible dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings have been deposited on homemade HA/Mg composites using a simple conversion coating method and a subsequent alkali post-treatment, respectively. The conversion coating mechanism was studied by comparing coating processes on the composites, pure Mg, and an AZ60 Mg alloy. Electrochemical results showed that polarization resistance of the optimum DCPD and HA coatings was about 15 and 65 times higher than that of the composites, respectively. Immersion tests in simulated body fluid revealed that both coatings could supply improved corrosion resistance and biomineralization abilit…

Yingchao Su – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • improvement of the Biodegradation Property and biomineralization ability of magnesium hydroxyapatite composites with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and hydroxyapatite coatings
    ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, 2016
    Co-Authors: Yingchao Su, Dayong Li, Yichang Su, Chengjia Lu, Jianshe Lian, Guangyu Li

    Abstract:

    The application of calcium phosphate reinforced magnesium matrix composites has not achieved the expected effect to control the degradation rate of magnesium so far. Therefore, in order to enhance the corrosion resistance and further develop the surface bioactivity of the composites to meet specific requirements of bone tissue engineering applications, biocompatible dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings have been deposited on homemade HA/Mg composites using a simple conversion coating method and a subsequent alkali post-treatment, respectively. The conversion coating mechanism was studied by comparing coating processes on the composites, pure Mg, and an AZ60 Mg alloy. Electrochemical results showed that polarization resistance of the optimum DCPD and HA coatings was about 15 and 65 times higher than that of the composites, respectively. Immersion tests in simulated body fluid revealed that both coatings could supply improved corrosion resistance and biomineralization abilit…

  • Improvement of the Biodegradation Property and Biomineralization Ability of Magnesium–Hydroxyapatite Composites with Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate and Hydroxyapatite Coatings
    ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, 2016
    Co-Authors: Yingchao Su, Dayong Li, Yichang Su, Chengjia Lu, Jianshe Lian, Guangyu Li

    Abstract:

    The application of calcium phosphate reinforced magnesium matrix composites has not achieved the expected effect to control the degradation rate of magnesium so far. Therefore, in order to enhance the corrosion resistance and further develop the surface bioactivity of the composites to meet specific requirements of bone tissue engineering applications, biocompatible dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings have been deposited on homemade HA/Mg composites using a simple conversion coating method and a subsequent alkali post-treatment, respectively. The conversion coating mechanism was studied by comparing coating processes on the composites, pure Mg, and an AZ60 Mg alloy. Electrochemical results showed that polarization resistance of the optimum DCPD and HA coatings was about 15 and 65 times higher than that of the composites, respectively. Immersion tests in simulated body fluid revealed that both coatings could supply improved corrosion resistance and biomineralization abilit…

Masahiro Yamada – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Biodegradation Property of beta tricalcium phosphate collagen composite in accordance with bone formation a comparative study with bio oss collagen in a rat critical size defect model
    Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, 2014
    Co-Authors: Eiji Kato, Jeffery Lemler, Kaoru Sakurai, Masahiro Yamada

    Abstract:

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare osteoconductivity and Biodegradation properties of an in-house fabricated beta-tricalcium phosphate (b-TCP)-collagen composite with those of Bio-Oss Collagen® (Osteohealth, Shirley, NY, USA) using a rat calvarial critical-size defect model. Materials and Methods: b-TCP–collagen composite material was fabricated by mixing b-TCP granules having a particle size of 0.15 to 0.8 mm and 75% porosity, with bovine dermis-derived soluble collagen sponge. The dry weight ratio of b-TCP granules-to-collagen ratios was 4:1. Bio-Oss Collagen or the b-TCP–collagen composite was used to fill a 5.0 mm–diameter calvarial defect in rats. The defects were evaluated by histological and histomorphological analyses of decalcified histological sections with hematoxylin and eosin staining 6 and 10 weeks, respectively, after surgery. Results: The defect implanted with the b-TCP composite contained immature bone structures with dense connective tissue in contrast to the abundant fibrous tissue, but no trabecular structure was observed within the defect implanted with Bio-Oss Collagen at 6 weeks postoperatively. Eventually, the defect filled with the b-TCP composite was covered with dense, continuous, mature bone tissue with complete replacement of the graft material. However, in defects filled with Bio-Oss Collagen, only dense connective tissue, containing limited amounts of immature trabecular bone and abundant remnant Bio-Oss particles, was observed. Histomorphological analysis revealed that the b-TCP composite caused greater tissue augmentation with a larger volume of bone tissue observed in the defect and greater bioabsorption of remnant material than Bio-Oss Collagen. Conclusion: These results indicated that the b-TCP composite has greater osteoconductivity and better Biodegradation properties than Bio-Oss Collagen; these properties of the b-TCP–collagen composite complimented bone formation and remodeling.