Bioeconomy - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Bioeconomy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 6237 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Daniela Thran – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • stakeholders interests and perceptions of Bioeconomy monitoring using a sustainable development goal framework
    Sustainability, 2019
    Co-Authors: Walther Zeug, Alberto Bezama, Urs Moesenfechtel, Anne Jahkel, Daniela Thran

    Abstract:

    The Bioeconomy as an industrial metabolism based on renewable resources is characterized by, not intrinsic, but rather potential benefits for global sustainability, depending on many factors and actors. Hence, an appropriate systematic monitoring of its development is vital and complexly linked to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as well as diverse stakeholder expectations. To structure a framework of the important aspects of such a monitoring system, we conducted a series of stakeholder workshops to assess the relevance of SDGs for the Bioeconomy. Our results show how the complexities of these issues are perceived by 64 stakeholders, indicating significant commonalities and differences among six SDGs, including specific interests, perceptions, and, in some cases, counterintuitive and contradictory issues. Eventually, the idea of a Bioeconomy is a question of the perception of ends and means of a societal transformation toward holistic sustainability. Global implications like trade-offs, hunger, poverty, and inequalities are aspects of high relevance for monitoring of Bioeconomy regions in which they actually do not seem to be substantial.

  • social life cycle assessment in pursuit of a framework for assessing wood based products from Bioeconomy regions in germany
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2018
    Co-Authors: Anke Siebert, Alberto Bezama, Sinead Okeeffe, Daniela Thran

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    With many policies in Germany steering towards a Bioeconomy, there is a need for analytical tools that assess not only the environmental and economic implications but also the social implications of a transition to a Bioeconomy. Wood is expected to become a major biomass resource in Bioeconomy regions. Therefore, this paper develops a social life cycle assessment (sLCA) framework that can be applied specifically to a wood-based production system in one of Germany’s Bioeconomy regions.

  • Social life cycle assessment: in pursuit of a framework for assessing wood-based products from Bioeconomy regions in Germany
    The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2018
    Co-Authors: Anke Siebert, Alberto Bezama, Sinéad O’keeffe, Daniela Thran

    Abstract:

    Purpose With many policies in Germany steering towards a Bioeconomy, there is a need for analytical tools that assess not only the environmental and economic implications but also the social implications of a transition to a Bioeconomy. Wood is expected to become a major biomass resource in Bioeconomy regions. Therefore, this paper develops a social life cycle assessment (sLCA) framework that can be applied specifically to a wood-based production system in one of Germany’s Bioeconomy regions. Methods This paper reviews and analyses existing sLCA approaches, in terms of how applicable they are for assessing a wood-based production system in a German Bioeconomy regional context. The analysis is structured according to the standard phases of environmental life cycle assessment (LCA). However, we use the term social effects rather than social impacts, to acknowledge the unknown cause–effect relationship between an organisation’s activities and its social impacts. We also consider the establishment of regional system boundaries, as well as the relationship between the social effects and the product being assessed. Additionally, an approach for the development and selection of social indicators and indices is outlined. Furthermore, we discuss data requirements and present an approach for a social life cycle impact assessment method. Results and discussion A new conceptual framework for a context-specific sLCA to assess wood-based products manufactured in a Bioeconomy region was developed. It enables sLCA practitioners to identify “social hotspots” and “social opportunities” from a regional perspective. The location and characteristics of these social hotspots and opportunities can be analysed, in particular, for major production activities in a Bioeconomy region in Germany. Therefore, according to this framework, the development of social indices and indicators, the collection of data and the approach used for characterising social effects need to relate to the geographical context of the product being assessed. The proposed framework can, thus, help to identify, monitor and evaluate the social sustainability of wood-based Bioeconomy chains in a regional context. Conclusions This framework requires a high level of detail in the social inventory and impact assessment phase, in order to assess the regional foreground activities in a German wood-based Bioeconomy region. It enables sLCA studies to identify which social hotspots and social opportunities occur and where they are located in the wood-based production system of a regional Bioeconomy.

Anke Siebert – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • social life cycle assessment in pursuit of a framework for assessing wood based products from Bioeconomy regions in germany
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2018
    Co-Authors: Anke Siebert, Alberto Bezama, Sinead Okeeffe, Daniela Thran

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    With many policies in Germany steering towards a Bioeconomy, there is a need for analytical tools that assess not only the environmental and economic implications but also the social implications of a transition to a Bioeconomy. Wood is expected to become a major biomass resource in Bioeconomy regions. Therefore, this paper develops a social life cycle assessment (sLCA) framework that can be applied specifically to a wood-based production system in one of Germany’s Bioeconomy regions.

  • Social life cycle assessment: in pursuit of a framework for assessing wood-based products from Bioeconomy regions in Germany
    The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2018
    Co-Authors: Anke Siebert, Alberto Bezama, Sinéad O’keeffe, Daniela Thran

    Abstract:

    Purpose With many policies in Germany steering towards a Bioeconomy, there is a need for analytical tools that assess not only the environmental and economic implications but also the social implications of a transition to a Bioeconomy. Wood is expected to become a major biomass resource in Bioeconomy regions. Therefore, this paper develops a social life cycle assessment (sLCA) framework that can be applied specifically to a wood-based production system in one of Germany’s Bioeconomy regions. Methods This paper reviews and analyses existing sLCA approaches, in terms of how applicable they are for assessing a wood-based production system in a German Bioeconomy regional context. The analysis is structured according to the standard phases of environmental life cycle assessment (LCA). However, we use the term social effects rather than social impacts, to acknowledge the unknown cause–effect relationship between an organisation’s activities and its social impacts. We also consider the establishment of regional system boundaries, as well as the relationship between the social effects and the product being assessed. Additionally, an approach for the development and selection of social indicators and indices is outlined. Furthermore, we discuss data requirements and present an approach for a social life cycle impact assessment method. Results and discussion A new conceptual framework for a context-specific sLCA to assess wood-based products manufactured in a Bioeconomy region was developed. It enables sLCA practitioners to identify “social hotspots” and “social opportunities” from a regional perspective. The location and characteristics of these social hotspots and opportunities can be analysed, in particular, for major production activities in a Bioeconomy region in Germany. Therefore, according to this framework, the development of social indices and indicators, the collection of data and the approach used for characterising social effects need to relate to the geographical context of the product being assessed. The proposed framework can, thus, help to identify, monitor and evaluate the social sustainability of wood-based Bioeconomy chains in a regional context. Conclusions This framework requires a high level of detail in the social inventory and impact assessment phase, in order to assess the regional foreground activities in a German wood-based Bioeconomy region. It enables sLCA studies to identify which social hotspots and social opportunities occur and where they are located in the wood-based production system of a regional Bioeconomy.

Tomasz Twardowski – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Bioeconomy development factors in the European Union and Poland.
    New Biotechnology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Ewa Woźniak, Agata Tyczewska, Tomasz Twardowski

    Abstract:

    Abstract Bioeconomy is not an autonomous sector of the economy, but rather a complex mechanism involving agriculture, industry, biotechnology, service sectors and consumers. To measure the size of the Bioeconomy in European Union (EU) countries, it is necessary to create appropriate indicators that allow it to be monitored with reference to its current state, growth rate and sector description. In many countries, including Poland, there is no complete information or data collection system to monitor Bioeconomy development directly, e.g. in the Polish Central Statistical Office. In response to these needs, several groups of indicators related to the circular economy, sustainable development and Europe 2020 were created by the European Commission (EC) in the Eurostat database. These indicators can help monitoring of Bioeconomy development in EU countries. The present study discusses factors for Bioeconomy development through an analysis of their social, economic and environmental aspects, as well as showing the value of the selected indicators in the EU and Poland. In addition, a separate section is dedicated to public perception of Bioeconomy and to legislation regarding genetically modified organisms (GMOs). To date, many research studies have been reported on the public acceptance of Bioeconomy issues in the EU, including renewable resources, biofuels, GMOs, bio-based products, food security and climate change. The awareness and perception of society on the Bioeconomy, bio-based products and processes, and the sustainable use of resources can contribute to environmental sustainability, but intensified efforts are required to increase public acceptance.

  • Bioeconomy for Sustainable Development.
    Biotechnology Journal, 2019
    Co-Authors: Alfredo Aguilar, Tomasz Twardowski, Roland Wohlgemuth

    Abstract:

    : Bioeconomy is an emerging paradigm under which the creation, development, and revitalization of economic systems based on a sustainable use of renewable biological resources in a balanced way is rapidly spreading globally. Bioeconomy is building bridges between biotechnology and economy as well as between science, industry, and society. Biotechnology, from its ancient origins up to the present is at the core of the scientific and innovative foundation of Bioeconomy policies developed in numerous countries. The challenges and perspectives of bioeconomies are immense, from resource-efficient large-scale manufacturing of products such as chemicals, materials, food, pharmaceuticals, polymers, flavors, and fragrances to the production of new biomaterials and bioenergy in a sustainable and economic way for a growing world population. Key success factors for different countries working on the Bioeconomy vary widely from high-tech bioeconomies, emerging diversified or diversified bioeconomies to advanced and basic primary sector bioeconomies. Despite the large variety of bioeconomies, several common elements are identified, which are simultaneously needed altogether.

  • Perspectives on Bioeconomy
    New Biotechnology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Alfredo Aguilar, Roland Wohlgemuth, Tomasz Twardowski

    Abstract:

    The insight provided by the authors of this special issue on Bioeconomy give a reassuring sign of optimism, vitality and strong will to make Bioeconomy a success story. Key to these advances will be inventing and shaping our future and the cooperation of people who will create new scientific and technological discoveries, developments and their implementation into industrial practice. The vibrant global megatrend Bioeconomy is developing along various dimensions depending on natural and social conditions, economic development and political objectives. As value chains from producer countries and regions to their corresponding customers are interconnected globally and bioeconomies are diverse, constructive dialogues and agreed social consensus are therefore relevant worldwide. Mapping and engineering the uncharted territories of the molecular transformations, which are key to the Bioeconomy, represents a great opportunity for the molecular and engineering sciences to bring in their important contributions. The development of smart bioeconomies needs excellence in science-based concepts, long-term support of innovative and mission-oriented research and a subtle equilibrium between science push and market and social pull. On the policy front, coherent and science-based policy decisions embracing Bioeconomy and being consistent with each other are needed. From a global perspective, Bioeconomy topics should be included in the international and national agendas on sustainable development goals.