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The Experts below are selected from a list of 132846 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Datta Madamwar – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • cyanobacteria and microalgae a positive prospect for Biofuels
    Bioresource Technology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Asha Parmar, Edgard Gnansounou, Niraj Kumar Singh, Ashok Pandey, Datta Madamwar

    Abstract:

    Biofuel–bioenergy production has generated intensive interest due to increased concern regarding limited petroleum-based fuel supplies and their contribution to atmospheric CO2 levels. Biofuel research is not just a matter of finding the right type of biomass and converting it to fuel, but it must also be economically sustainable on large-scale. Several aspects of cyanobacteria and microalgae such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high per-acre productivity, non-food based feedstock, growth on non-productive and non-arable land, utilization of wide variety of water sources (fresh, brackish, seawater and wastewater) and production of valuable co-products along with Biofuels have combined to capture the interest of researchers and entrepreneurs. Currently, worldwide Biofuels mainly in focus include biohydrogen, bioethanol, biodiesel and biogas. This review focuses on cultivation and harvesting of cyanobacteria and microalgae, possible Biofuels and co-products, challenges for cyanobacterial and microalgal Biofuels and the approaches of genetic engineering and modifications to increase biofuel production.

  • Cyanobacteria and microalgae: A positive prospect for Biofuels
    Bioresource Technology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Asha Parmar, Edgard Gnansounou, Niraj Kumar Singh, Ashok Pandey, Datta Madamwar

    Abstract:

    Biofuel-bioenergy production has generated intensive interest due to increased concern regarding limited petroleum-based fuel supplies and their contribution to atmospheric CO 2 levels. Biofuel research is not just a matter of finding the right type of biomass and converting it to fuel, but it must also be economically sustainable on large-scale. Several aspects of cyanobacteria and microalgae such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high per-acre productivity, non-food based feedstock, growth on non-productive and non-arable land, utilization of wide variety of water sources (fresh, brackish, seawater and wastewater) and production of valuable co-products along with Biofuels have combined to capture the interest of researchers and entrepreneurs. Currently, worldwide Biofuels mainly in focus include biohydrogen, bioethanol, biodiesel and biogas. This review focuses on cultivation and harvesting of cyanobacteria and microalgae, possible Biofuels and co-products, challenges for cyanobacterial and microalgal Biofuels and the approaches of genetic engineering and modifications to increase biofuel production. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

Ayhan Demirbas – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Biofuels sources, biofuel policy, biofuel economy and global biofuel projections
    Energy Conversion and Management, 2008
    Co-Authors: Ayhan Demirbas

    Abstract:

    The term biofuel is referred to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. Biofuels include bioethanol, biomethanol, vegetable oils, biodiesel, biogas, bio-synthetic gas (bio-syngas), bio-oil, bio-char, Fischer-Tropsch liquids, and biohydrogen. Most traditional Biofuels, such as ethanol from corn, wheat, or sugar beets, and biodiesel from oil seeds, are produced from classic agricultural food crops that require high-quality agricultural land for growth. Bioethanol is a petrol additive/substitute. Biomethanol can be produced from biomass using bio-syngas obtained from steam reforming process of biomass. Biomethanol is considerably easier to recover than the bioethanol from biomass. Ethanol forms an azeotrope with water so it is expensive to purify the ethanol during recovery. Methanol recycles easier because it does not form an azeotrope. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly alternative liquid fuel that can be used in any diesel engine without modification. There has been renewed interest in the use of vegetable oils for making biodiesel due to its less polluting and renewable nature as against the conventional petroleum diesel fuel. Due to its environmental merits, the share of biofuel in the automotive fuel market will grow fast in the next decade. There are several reasons for Biofuels to be considered as relevant technologies by both developing and industrialized countries. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. The biofuel economy will grow rapidly during the 21st century. Its economy development is based on agricultural production and most people live in the rural areas. In the most biomass-intensive scenario, modernized biomass energy contributes by 2050 about one half of total energy demand in developing countries.

  • Biofuels sources, biofuel policy, biofuel economy and global biofuel projections
    Energy Conversion and Management, 2008
    Co-Authors: Ayhan Demirbas

    Abstract:

    The term biofuel is referred to liquid, gas and solid fuels predominantly produced from biomass. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. Biofuels include bioethanol, biomethanol, vegetable oils, biodiesel, biogas, bio-synthetic gas (bio-syngas), bio-oil, bio-char, Fischer-Tropsch liquids, and biohydrogen. Most traditional Biofuels, such as ethanol from corn, wheat, or sugar beets, and biodiesel from oil seeds, are produced from classic agricultural food crops that require high-quality agricultural land for growth. Bioethanol is a petrol additive/substitute. Biomethanol can be produced from biomass using bio-syngas obtained from steam reforming process of biomass. Biomethanol is considerably easier to recover than the bioethanol from biomass. Ethanol forms an azeotrope with water so it is expensive to purify the ethanol during recovery. Methanol recycles easier because it does not form an azeotrope. Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly alternative liquid fuel that can be used in any diesel engine without modification. There has been renewed interest in the use of vegetable oils for making biodiesel due to its less polluting and renewable nature as against the conventional petroleum diesel fuel. Due to its environmental merits, the share of biofuel in the automotive fuel market will grow fast in the next decade. There are several reasons for Biofuels to be considered as relevant technologies by both developing and industrialized countries. Biofuels include energy security reasons, environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socioeconomic issues related to the rural sector. The biofuel economy will grow rapidly during the 21st century. Its economy development is based on agricultural production and most people live in the rural areas. In the most biomass-intensive scenario, modernized biomass energy contributes by 2050 about one half of total energy demand in developing countries. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Edgard Gnansounou – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Social Assessment of Biofuels
    Biofuels: Alternative Feedstocks and Conversion Processes for the Production of Liquid and Gaseous Biofuels, 2019
    Co-Authors: Edgard Gnansounou, Catarina M. Alves

    Abstract:

    Abstract In the last decade, several authors have addressed the social issues of Biofuels in a more or less systematic manner covering several geographical contexts around the globe, types of feedstock, products and coproducts, and targeting different groups of stakeholders. The methodology most developed and applied to Biofuels projects so far is the social life cycle assessment. In turn, the most advanced tool for general data analysis is the social hotspot database. The majority of the biofuel scenarios under evaluation present oil-bearing crops or lignocellulosic residues as the main feedstock. Bioethanol figures the largest number of social studies. In brief, the key social benefits of Biofuels are related to employment, workforce training and education, income generation, and rural development. On the other hand, in case of lack of social management along the biofuel chains, negative outcomes are the disrespect for the smallholder and rural community rights, the poor working conditions along the biofuel supply chains, the existence of migrant workers with precarious living conditions and finally, the issues related to land use and rights.

  • Impact of agricultural-based biofuel production on greenhouse gas emissions from land-use change: Key modelling choices
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2015
    Co-Authors: Luis Panichelli, Edgard Gnansounou

    Abstract:

    Recent regulations on Biofuels require reporting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions related to feedstock-specific Biofuels. However, the inclusion of GHG emissions from land-use change (LUC) into law and policy remains a subject of active discussion, with LUC-GHG emissions an issue of intense research. This article identifies key modelling choices for assessing the impact of biofuel production on LUC-GHG emissions. The identification of these modelling choices derives from evaluation and critical comparison of models from commonly accepted Biofuels-LUC-GHG modelling approaches. The selection and comparison of models were intended to cover factors related to production of agricultural-based biofuel, provision of land for feedstock, and GHG emissions from land-use conversion. However, some fundamental modelling issues are common to all stages of assessment and require resolution, including choice of scale and spatial coverage, approach to accounting for time, and level of aggregation. It is argued here that significant improvements have been made to address LUC-GHG emissions from Biofuels. Several models have been created, adapted, coupled, and integrated, but room for improvement remains in representing LUC-GHG emissions from specific biofuel production pathways, as follows: more detailed and integrated modelling of biofuel supply chains; more complete modelling of policy frameworks, accounting for forest dynamics and other drivers of LUC; more heterogeneous modelling of spatial patterns of LUC and associated GHG emissions; and clearer procedures for accounting for the time-dependency of variables. It is concluded that coupling the results of different models is a convenient strategy for addressing effects with different time and space scales. In contrast, model integration requires unified scales and time approaches to provide generalised representations of the system. Guidelines for estimating and reporting LUC-GHG emissions are required to help modellers to define the most suitable approaches and policy makers to better understand the complex impacts of agricultural-based biofuel production.

  • cyanobacteria and microalgae a positive prospect for Biofuels
    Bioresource Technology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Asha Parmar, Edgard Gnansounou, Niraj Kumar Singh, Ashok Pandey, Datta Madamwar

    Abstract:

    Biofuel–bioenergy production has generated intensive interest due to increased concern regarding limited petroleum-based fuel supplies and their contribution to atmospheric CO2 levels. Biofuel research is not just a matter of finding the right type of biomass and converting it to fuel, but it must also be economically sustainable on large-scale. Several aspects of cyanobacteria and microalgae such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high per-acre productivity, non-food based feedstock, growth on non-productive and non-arable land, utilization of wide variety of water sources (fresh, brackish, seawater and wastewater) and production of valuable co-products along with Biofuels have combined to capture the interest of researchers and entrepreneurs. Currently, worldwide Biofuels mainly in focus include biohydrogen, bioethanol, biodiesel and biogas. This review focuses on cultivation and harvesting of cyanobacteria and microalgae, possible Biofuels and co-products, challenges for cyanobacterial and microalgal Biofuels and the approaches of genetic engineering and modifications to increase biofuel production.