Biological Evolution - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Biological Evolution

The Experts below are selected from a list of 122553 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Saouma Boujaoude – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • biology professors and teachers positions regarding Biological Evolution and Evolution education in a middle eastern society
    International Journal of Science Education, 2011
    Co-Authors: Saouma Boujaoude, Anila Asghar, Jason R Wiles, Lama Z Jaber, Diana Sarieddine, Brian Alters

    Abstract:

    This study investigated three questions: (1) What are Lebanese secondary school (Grade 9–12) biology teachers’ and university biology professors’ positions regarding Biological Evolution?, (2) How do participants’ religious affiliations relate to their positions about Evolutionary science?, and (3) What are participants’ positions regarding Evolution education? Participants were 20 secondary school biology teachers and seven university biology professors. Seventy percent of the teachers and 60% of the professors were Muslim. Data came from semi‐structured interviews with participants. Results showed that nine (Christian or Muslim Druze) teachers accepted the theory, five (four Muslim) rejected it because it contradicted religious beliefs, and three (Muslim) reinterpreted it because Evolution did not include humans. Teachers who rejected or reinterpreted the Evolutionary theory said that it should not be taught (three), Evolution and creationism should be given equal time (two), or students should be allow…

  • scientific views and religious beliefs of college students the case of Biological Evolution
    Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1997
    Co-Authors: Zoubeida R Dagher, Saouma Boujaoude

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to explore how some university biology majors in Beirut, Lebanon, accommodate the theory of Biological Evolution with their existing religious beliefs. Sixty-two students enrolled in a required senior biology seminar responded to open-ended questions that addressed (a) their understanding of the theory of Evolution, (b) their perception of conflict between this theory and religion, and (c) whether the theory of Evolution clashed with their own beliefs about the world. Based on their responses, 15 students were selected for an in-depth exploration of their written responses. Students’ answers clustered under 1 of 4 main positions: for Evolution, against Evolution, compromise, and neutral. The authors suggest that teaching students about the nature of scientific facts, theories, and evidence is more likely to enhance understanding of Evolutionary theory if students are given the opportunity to discuss their values and beliefs in relation to scientific knowledge. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 34: 429–445, 1997.

Edmund A. Marek – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Study Identifying Biological Evolution-Related Misconceptions Held by Prebiology High School Students
    Creative Education, 2015
    Co-Authors: Tony B Yates, Edmund A. Marek

    Abstract:

    Students bring a diverse array of ideas about natural events to their science classes, and many of these ideas are often at variance with the scientifically accepted views. Numerous studies have identified multiple Biological Evolution-related misconceptions held by select groups of students. Collectively, these studies repeatedly indicate that students with varying educational backgrounds have difficulties accurately understanding the concepts of Evolution. Because scientific literacy in the field of biology necessitates a basic understanding of Evolution concepts and theory, students’ possession of Biological Evolution-related misconceptions is problematic. The focus of this study was to identify the types and prevalence of such misconceptions within a state’s public high schools’ prebiology students and to correlate those findings with demographic variables. Some 993 students enrolled in their initial high school biology course during the 2010-2011 academic years in one of 42 Oklahoma public high schools served as this study’s unit of analysis. The Biological Evolution Literacy Survey which presents 23 Biological misconception statements grouped into five categories, served as the research tool for identifying students’ misconceptions, calculating conception index scores, and collecting demographic data. Multiple statistical analyses were performed to identify statistically significant (p < 0.05) relationships between variables related to students’ number and types of misconceptions. Analysis revealed that participants possess a mean 43.9% rate of understanding of those Biological Evolution concepts presented in the BEL Survey combined with a 39.1% mean misconception rate. A statistically significant difference in participants’ BEL Survey mean index scores when related to Biological Evolution knowledge self-rating was also disclosed. Strategies for identifying and eliminating students’ misconceptions are offered. Misconceptions of Biological Evolution were prevalent within this student population and the findings corroborate the literature that reports a strikingly high prevalence of Biological Evolution-related misconceptions in students at all levels, from elementary pupils to university science majors.

  • Teachers teaching misconceptions: a study of factors contributing to high school biology students’ acquisition of Biological Evolution-related misconceptions
    Evolution: Education and Outreach, 2014
    Co-Authors: Tony B Yates, Edmund A. Marek

    Abstract:

    Research has revealed that high school students matriculate to college holding misconceptions related to Biological Evolution. These misconceptions interfere with students’ abilities to grasp accurate scientific explanations and serve as fundamental barriers to understanding Evolution. Because the scientific community regards Evolution as a vital part of science education, it is imperative that students’ misconceptions are identified and their sources revealed. The purpose of this study was to identify the types and prevalence of Biological Evolution-related misconceptions held by high school biology teachers and their students, and to identify those factors that contribute to student acquisition of such misconceptions, with particular emphasis given to the role of the teacher. Thirty-five teachers who taught at least one section of Biology I during the 2010 to 2011 academic year in one of 32 Oklahoma public high schools and their respective 536 students served as this study’s unit of analysis. The Biological Evolution Literacy Survey, which possesses 23 Biological Evolution misconception statements grouped into five categories, served as the research tool for identifying teachers’ misconceptions prior to student instruction and students’ misconceptions both prior to and following instruction in Biological Evolution concepts, calculating conception index scores, and collecting demographic data. Multiple statistical analyses were performed to identify statistically significant (p < .05) relationships between variables related to student’s acquisition of Biological Evolution-related misconceptions. Analyses revealed that students typically exit the Biology I classroom more confident in their Biological Evolution knowledge but holding greater numbers of misconceptions than they initially possessed upon entering the course. Significant relationships between student acquisition of misconceptions and teachers’ bachelor’s degree field, terminal degree, and hours dedicated to Evolution instruction were also revealed. In addition, the probabilities that specific Biological Evolution-related misconceptions were being transmitted from teachers to their students were also identified. This study reveals some problematic issues concerning the teaching of Biological Evolution in Oklahoma’s public high school introductory biology course. No doubt, multiple factors contribute in varying degrees to the acquisition and retention of student misconceptions of Biological Evolution. However, based on this study’s results, there is little doubt that teachers may serve as sources of Biological Evolution-related misconceptions or, at the very least, propagators of existing misconceptions. It is imperative that we as educators identify sources of student Biological Evolution-related misconceptions, identify or develop strategies to reduce or eliminate such misconceptions, and implement these strategies at the appropriate junctures in students’ cognitive development.

  • Is Oklahoma really OK? A regional study of the prevalence of Biological Evolution-related misconceptions held by introductory biology teachers
    Evolution: Education and Outreach, 2013
    Co-Authors: Tony B Yates, Edmund A. Marek

    Abstract:

    Background Biological Evolutionary explanations pervade all Biological fields and bring them together under one theoretical umbrella. Whereas the scientific community embraces the theory of Biological Evolution, the general public largely lacks an understanding, with many adhering to misconceptions. Because teachers are functioning components of the general public and most teachers experience the same levels of science education as does the general public, teachers too are likely to hold Biological Evolution misconceptions. The focus of this study was to identify the types and prevalence of Biological Evolution misconceptions held by Oklahoma high school introductory biology teachers and to correlate those findings with demographic variables. Methods Seventy-six teachers who taught at least one section of Biology I during the 2010 to 2011 academic year in one of 71 Oklahoma public high schools served as this study’s unit of analysis. The Biological Evolution Literacy Survey , which possesses 23 Biological misconception statements grouped into five categories, served as the research tool for identifying participants’ misconceptions, calculating conception index scores, and collecting demographic data. Results Analysis of survey results revealed participants’ knowledge of Biological Evolution concepts to be lacking as indicated by a mean 72.9% rate of understanding coupled with a 23.0% misconception rate. Results also indicated significant differences in participants’ mean index scores related to Biological Evolution knowledge self-rating and hours dedicated to teaching Evolution. Conclusions Biological Evolution-related misconceptions are prevalent within Oklahoma’s introductory biology teachers. Implications associated with the study’s results are explained, including that of teachers serving as sources of student misconceptions.

Alec M. Bodzin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Effectiveness of an Online Curriculum on High School Students’ Understanding of Biological Evolution
    Journal of Science Education and Technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Robert B. Marsteller, Alec M. Bodzin

    Abstract:

    An online curriculum about Biological Evolution was designed to promote increased student content knowledge and evidentiary reasoning. A feasibility study was conducted with 77 rural high school biology students who learned with the online Biological Evolution unit. Data sources included the Biological Evolution Assessment Measure (BEAM), an analysis of discussion forum posts, and a post-implementation perceptions and attitudes questionnaire. BEAM posttest scores were significantly higher than the pretest scores. However, the findings revealed that the students required additional support to develop evidentiary reasoning. Many students perceived that the Web-based curriculum would have been enhanced by increased immediate interaction and feedback. Students required greater scaffolding to support complex, process-oriented tasks. Implications for designing Web-based science instruction with curriculum materials to support students’ acquisition of content knowledge and science process skills in a Web-based setting are discussed.