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Biological Implant

The Experts below are selected from a list of 120 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Bernd Stadlinger – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a systematic review and meta analysis on the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2016
    Co-Authors: Gregor J. Jenny, Johanna Jauernik, Susanne Bierbaum, Martin Bigler, Klaus W. Grätz, Martin Rücker, Bernd Stadlinger

    Abstract:

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation in comparison to an uncoated titanium reference surface in experimental large animal models. The analysis was structured according to the PRISMA criteriae. Of the1077 studies, 30 studies met the inclusion criteriae. Nineteen studies examined the bone Implant contact (BIC) and were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the mean increase in BIC for the test surfaces compared to the reference surfaces was 3.7 percentage points (pp) (95% CI -3.9-11.2, p = 0.339). Analyzing the increase in BIC for specific coated surfaces in comparison to uncoated reference surfaces, inorganic surface coatings showed a significant mean increase in BIC of 14.7 pp (95% CI 10.6-18.9, p < 0.01), extracellular matrix (ECM) surface coatings showed an increase of 10.0 pp (95% CI 4.4-15.6, p < 0.001), and peptide coatings showed a statistical trend with 7.1 pp BIC increase (95% CI -0.8-15.0, p = 0.08). In this review, no statistically significant difference could be found for growth factor surface coatings (observed difference -3.3 pp, 95% CI -16.5-9.9, p = 0.6). All analyses are exploratory in nature. The results show a statistically significant effect of inorganic and ECM coatings on periImplant bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2898-2910, 2016.

  • A systematic review and meta‐analysis on the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2016
    Co-Authors: Gregor J. Jenny, Johanna Jauernik, Susanne Bierbaum, Martin Bigler, Klaus W. Grätz, Martin Rücker, Bernd Stadlinger

    Abstract:

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation in comparison to an uncoated titanium reference surface in experimental large animal models. The analysis was structured according to the PRISMA criteriae. Of the1077 studies, 30 studies met the inclusion criteriae. Nineteen studies examined the bone Implant contact (BIC) and were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the mean increase in BIC for the test surfaces compared to the reference surfaces was 3.7 percentage points (pp) (95% CI -3.9-11.2, p = 0.339). Analyzing the increase in BIC for specific coated surfaces in comparison to uncoated reference surfaces, inorganic surface coatings showed a significant mean increase in BIC of 14.7 pp (95% CI 10.6-18.9, p 

  • Effect of Biological Implant surface coatings on bone formation, applying collagen, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and growth factors
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Bernd Stadlinger, Susanne Bierbaum, Eckart Pilling, Ricardo Berhardt, Dieter Scharnweber, Uwe Eckelt

    Abstract:

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate six different Implant surface coatings with respect to bone formation. Being major structural components of the extracellular matrix, collagen, the non-collagenous components decorin/chondroitin sulphate (CS) and the growth factors TGF-β1/BMP-4 served in different combinations as coatings of experimental titanium Implants. Materials and methods Eight miniature pigs received each six Implants in the mandible. The Implant design showed two circular recesses along the length axis. Three, four, five and six weeks after Implant placement, the animals were sacrificed in groups of two. Bone-Implant contact (BIC) was evaluated along the outer Implant surface and within the recesses. Bone volume was determined by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SRμCT) for one Implant of each surface state, 6 weeks after placement. Results At each week of observation, collagen/CS or collagen/CS/BMP-4 coated Implants showed the highest BIC of all surface states. This was statistically significant at week five ( p  = 0.030, p  = 0.040) and six ( p  = 0.025, p  = 0.005). SRμCT measurements determined the highest bone volume for a collagen/CS coated Implant. Conclusion The results indicate that collagen/CS and collagen/CS/BMP-4 lead to a higher degree of bone formation compared to other ECM components.

Uwe Eckelt – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effect of Biological Implant surface coatings on bone formation, applying collagen, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and growth factors
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Bernd Stadlinger, Susanne Bierbaum, Eckart Pilling, Ricardo Berhardt, Dieter Scharnweber, Uwe Eckelt

    Abstract:

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate six different Implant surface coatings with respect to bone formation. Being major structural components of the extracellular matrix, collagen, the non-collagenous components decorin/chondroitin sulphate (CS) and the growth factors TGF-β1/BMP-4 served in different combinations as coatings of experimental titanium Implants. Materials and methods Eight miniature pigs received each six Implants in the mandible. The Implant design showed two circular recesses along the length axis. Three, four, five and six weeks after Implant placement, the animals were sacrificed in groups of two. Bone-Implant contact (BIC) was evaluated along the outer Implant surface and within the recesses. Bone volume was determined by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SRμCT) for one Implant of each surface state, 6 weeks after placement. Results At each week of observation, collagen/CS or collagen/CS/BMP-4 coated Implants showed the highest BIC of all surface states. This was statistically significant at week five ( p  = 0.030, p  = 0.040) and six ( p  = 0.025, p  = 0.005). SRμCT measurements determined the highest bone volume for a collagen/CS coated Implant. Conclusion The results indicate that collagen/CS and collagen/CS/BMP-4 lead to a higher degree of bone formation compared to other ECM components.

  • effect of Biological Implant surface coatings on bone formation applying collagen proteoglycans glycosaminoglycans and growth factors
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Bernd Stadlinger, Susanne Bierbaum, Eckart Pilling, Ricardo Berhardt, Dieter Scharnweber, Uwe Eckelt

    Abstract:

    Objectives
    The aim of the present study was to evaluate six different Implant surface coatings with respect to bone formation. Being major structural components of the extracellular matrix, collagen, the non-collagenous components decorin/chondroitin sulphate (CS) and the growth factors TGF-β1/BMP-4 served in different combinations as coatings of experimental titanium Implants.

Susanne Bierbaum – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a systematic review and meta analysis on the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2016
    Co-Authors: Gregor J. Jenny, Johanna Jauernik, Susanne Bierbaum, Martin Bigler, Klaus W. Grätz, Martin Rücker, Bernd Stadlinger

    Abstract:

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation in comparison to an uncoated titanium reference surface in experimental large animal models. The analysis was structured according to the PRISMA criteriae. Of the1077 studies, 30 studies met the inclusion criteriae. Nineteen studies examined the bone Implant contact (BIC) and were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the mean increase in BIC for the test surfaces compared to the reference surfaces was 3.7 percentage points (pp) (95% CI -3.9-11.2, p = 0.339). Analyzing the increase in BIC for specific coated surfaces in comparison to uncoated reference surfaces, inorganic surface coatings showed a significant mean increase in BIC of 14.7 pp (95% CI 10.6-18.9, p < 0.01), extracellular matrix (ECM) surface coatings showed an increase of 10.0 pp (95% CI 4.4-15.6, p < 0.001), and peptide coatings showed a statistical trend with 7.1 pp BIC increase (95% CI -0.8-15.0, p = 0.08). In this review, no statistically significant difference could be found for growth factor surface coatings (observed difference -3.3 pp, 95% CI -16.5-9.9, p = 0.6). All analyses are exploratory in nature. The results show a statistically significant effect of inorganic and ECM coatings on periImplant bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2898-2910, 2016.

  • A systematic review and meta‐analysis on the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2016
    Co-Authors: Gregor J. Jenny, Johanna Jauernik, Susanne Bierbaum, Martin Bigler, Klaus W. Grätz, Martin Rücker, Bernd Stadlinger

    Abstract:

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the influence of Biological Implant surface coatings on periImplant bone formation in comparison to an uncoated titanium reference surface in experimental large animal models. The analysis was structured according to the PRISMA criteriae. Of the1077 studies, 30 studies met the inclusion criteriae. Nineteen studies examined the bone Implant contact (BIC) and were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the mean increase in BIC for the test surfaces compared to the reference surfaces was 3.7 percentage points (pp) (95% CI -3.9-11.2, p = 0.339). Analyzing the increase in BIC for specific coated surfaces in comparison to uncoated reference surfaces, inorganic surface coatings showed a significant mean increase in BIC of 14.7 pp (95% CI 10.6-18.9, p 

  • Effect of Biological Implant surface coatings on bone formation, applying collagen, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and growth factors
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Bernd Stadlinger, Susanne Bierbaum, Eckart Pilling, Ricardo Berhardt, Dieter Scharnweber, Uwe Eckelt

    Abstract:

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate six different Implant surface coatings with respect to bone formation. Being major structural components of the extracellular matrix, collagen, the non-collagenous components decorin/chondroitin sulphate (CS) and the growth factors TGF-β1/BMP-4 served in different combinations as coatings of experimental titanium Implants. Materials and methods Eight miniature pigs received each six Implants in the mandible. The Implant design showed two circular recesses along the length axis. Three, four, five and six weeks after Implant placement, the animals were sacrificed in groups of two. Bone-Implant contact (BIC) was evaluated along the outer Implant surface and within the recesses. Bone volume was determined by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SRμCT) for one Implant of each surface state, 6 weeks after placement. Results At each week of observation, collagen/CS or collagen/CS/BMP-4 coated Implants showed the highest BIC of all surface states. This was statistically significant at week five ( p  = 0.030, p  = 0.040) and six ( p  = 0.025, p  = 0.005). SRμCT measurements determined the highest bone volume for a collagen/CS coated Implant. Conclusion The results indicate that collagen/CS and collagen/CS/BMP-4 lead to a higher degree of bone formation compared to other ECM components.