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Biological Tissue

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Lihong V Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Photoacoustic tomography of water in Biological Tissue
    Proceedings of SPIE, 2011
    Co-Authors: Zhun Xu, Changhui Li, Lihong V Wang

    Abstract:

    As an emerging imaging technique that combines high optical contrast and ultrasonic detection, photoacoustic
    tomography (PAT) has been widely used to image optically absorptive objects in both human and animal Tissues. PAT
    overcomes the depth limitation of other high-resolution optical imaging methods, and it is also free from speckle
    artifacts. To our knowledge, water has never been imaged by PAT in Biological Tissue. Here, for the first time, we
    experimentally imaged water in both Tissue phantoms and Biological Tissues using a near infrared (NIR) light source. The
    differences among photoacoustic images of water with different concentrations indicate that laser-based PAT can
    usefully detect and image water content in Tissue.

  • depth resolved two dimensional stokes vectors of backscattered light and mueller matrices of Biological Tissue measured with optical coherence tomography
    Applied Optics, 2000
    Co-Authors: Shuliang Jiao, Lihong V Wang

    Abstract:

    Mueller matrices provide a complete characterization of the optical polarization properties of Biological Tissue. A polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) system was built and used to investigate the optical polarization properties of Biological Tissues and other turbid media. The apparent degree of polarization (DOP) of the backscattered light was measured with both liquid and solid scattering samples. The DOP maintains the value of unity within the detectable depth for the solid sample, whereas the DOP decreases with the optical depth for the liquid sample. Two-dimensional depth-resolved images of both the Stokes vectors of the backscattered light and the full Mueller matrices of Biological Tissue were measured with this system. These polarization measurements revealed some Tissue structures that are not perceptible with standard OCT.

  • Study of ultrasound-modulated optical tomography in Biological Tissue with parallel detection
    Proceedings of the 22nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (Cat. No.00CH37143), 2000
    Co-Authors: Lihong V Wang

    Abstract:

    An ultrasonic beam was focused into a Biological Tissue sample to modulate the laser light passing through the ultrasonic beam inside the Tissue. The speckle field formed by the transmitted laser light was detected by a CCD camera with the source-synchronous-illumination lock-in technique. The ultrasound-modulated laser light reflects the local optical and mechanical properties within the ultrasonic beam and can be used for tomographic imaging of the Tissue. Spatial resolution along the ultrasonic axis was achieved by sweeping the ultrasonic frequency. Two-dimensional images of Biological Tissue were successfully obtained with both single frequency modulation and frequency-swept modulation. Three-dimensional images could be acquired as well in principle.

Geng Ku – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • scanning thermoacoustic tomography in Biological Tissue
    Medical Physics, 2000
    Co-Authors: Geng Ku, Lihong V Wang

    Abstract:

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography was explored to image Biological Tissue. Short microwave pulses irradiated Tissue to generate acoustic waves by thermoelastic expansion. The microwave-induced thermoacoustic waves were detected with a focused ultrasonic transducer. Each time-domain signal from the ultrasonic transducer represented a one-dimensional image along the acoustic axis of the ultrasonic transducer similar to an ultrasonic A-scan. Scanning the system perpendicularly to the acoustic axis of the ultrasonic transducer would generate multi-dimensional images. Two-dimensional tomographic images of Biological Tissue were obtained with 3-GHz microwaves. The axial and lateral resolutions were characterized. The time-domain piezo-electric signal from the ultrasonic transducer in response to the thermoacoustic signal was simulated theoretically, and the theoretical result agreed with the experimental result very well.

  • Scanning thermoacoustic tomography in Biological Tissue
    Medical Physics, 2000
    Co-Authors: Geng Ku, Lei Wang

    Abstract:

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography was explored to image Biological Tissue. Short microwave pulses irradiated Tissue to generate acoustic waves by thermoelastic expansion. The microwave-induced thermoacoustic waves were detected with a focused ultrasonic transducer. Each time-domain signal from the ultrasonic transducer represented a one-dimensional image along the acoustic axis of the ultrasonic transducer similar to an ultrasonic A-scan. Scanning the system perpendicularly to the acoustic axis of the ultrasonic transducer would generate multi-dimensional images. Two-dimensional tomographic images of Biological Tissue were obtained with 3-GHz microwaves. The axial and lateral resolutions were characterized. The time-domain piezo-electric signal from the ultrasonic transducer in response to the thermoacoustic signal was simulated theoretically, and the theoretical result agreed with the experimental result very well. (C) 2000 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. [S0094-2405(00)03105-9].

Lei Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Scanning thermoacoustic tomography in Biological Tissue
    Medical Physics, 2000
    Co-Authors: Geng Ku, Lei Wang

    Abstract:

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography was explored to image Biological Tissue. Short microwave pulses irradiated Tissue to generate acoustic waves by thermoelastic expansion. The microwave-induced thermoacoustic waves were detected with a focused ultrasonic transducer. Each time-domain signal from the ultrasonic transducer represented a one-dimensional image along the acoustic axis of the ultrasonic transducer similar to an ultrasonic A-scan. Scanning the system perpendicularly to the acoustic axis of the ultrasonic transducer would generate multi-dimensional images. Two-dimensional tomographic images of Biological Tissue were obtained with 3-GHz microwaves. The axial and lateral resolutions were characterized. The time-domain piezo-electric signal from the ultrasonic transducer in response to the thermoacoustic signal was simulated theoretically, and the theoretical result agreed with the experimental result very well. (C) 2000 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. [S0094-2405(00)03105-9].