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Biological Water Treatment

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Stefan Mihai Petrea – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Vegetable production in an integrated aquaponic system with rainbow trout and spinach.
    Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca. Animal Science and Biotechnologies, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stefan Mihai Petrea, Victor Cristea, Lorena Dediu, Maria Contoman, Paul Lupoae, Mirela (cretu) Mocanu, M. T. Coadă

    Abstract:

    Abstract. Background: In an integrated aquaponic system, the ratio between nitrogen production and plant assimilation is a key factor for system efficiency. That is why plant density is very important to be appropriate. Aims: The aim of this study is to expose the performances of growth parameters, both in terms of quantity and quality, for Nores variety spinach ( Spinacia oleracea ) produced in an aquaponic integrated system along with rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ), under three plant densities (V1 – 59 plants/m 2 , V2 – 48plants/m 2 and V3 – 39plants/m 2 ). Materials and methods: The experimental design consist in a recirculating aquaculture system with 12 growing units, mechanical and Biological Water Treatment units and four aquaponic units. Three plants densities were used (59, 48 and 39plants/m 2 ). A fish stocking density of 136fish/m 3 was used. Plants initial and final biomass was taken and a series of periodic measurements were made. Chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids, ash and dry matter were determined from spinach leaf. Results: The plant biomass gain registered good values and the quality of final plant products, given by the chlorophyll a, b , carotenoids and dry matter content were in the optimal variation interval, comparing to market spinach. Significant differences (p

  • A Study of Nitrogen Cycle in an Integrated Aquaponic System with Different Plant Densities
    Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca. Animal Science and Biotechnologies, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stefan Mihai Petrea, Victor Cristea, Lorena Dediu, Maria Contoman, Mirela (cretu) Mocanu, Alina Antache

    Abstract:

    Introduction: There is no doubt that a fundamental element like nitrogen is one of the most important components in both animal and plants cells. Within an integrated aquaponic system, nitrogen cycle has highest priority because it converts fish wastes into nutrients for plants. Aims: The main goal of this study is to quantify the nitrogen budget for an integrated rainbow trout – spinach aquaponic system, where three plants densities were used. The second objective is to determine a balanced plant density for optimal nitrogen removal rate and hydroponic vegetable production. Materials and methods: The experimental design consist in a recirculating aquaculture system with 12 growing units, mechanical and Biological Water Treatment units and four aquaponic units. Three plants densities were used (V1 – 59plants/m 2 , V2 – 48plants/m 2 and V3 – 39plants/m 2 and a control variant V4). Fish were fed with two types of feed (41% and 50% protein), using 3 different feeding regimes. Water samples were taken and analysed by using Merck kits so that nitrate, ammonium and TAN retention rates will be observed. Water oxygen, pH and conductivity levels were also monitored. The meat, plants and faeces nitrogen content was determined by Kjeldahl method. The feed protein content was verified using the same method. Results: The amount of nitrogen removed from integrated aquaponic system through Biological filtration and also by each of the three tested spinach biomass densities was determined apart. The nitrate, ammonium and TAN retention rates, as Water passes through mechanical filter, were found to be insignificant (p>0,05), compared to ones from the Biological filter that were higher. Differences between the retention rates for each of the three variants of tested plants densities were significant higher (p

  • Vegetable Production in an Integrated Aquaponic System with Rainbow Trout and Spinach
    Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca. Animal Science and Biotechnologies, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stefan Mihai Petrea, Victor Cristea, Lorena Dediu, Maria Contoman, Paul Lupoae, Mirela (cretu) Mocanu, Marian Tiberiu Coadă

    Abstract:

    Abstract. Background: In an integrated aquaponic system, the ratio between nitrogen production and plant assimilation is a key factor for system efficiency. That is why plant density is very important to be appropriate. Aims: The aim of this study is to expose the performances of growth parameters, both in terms of quantity and quality, for Nores variety spinach ( Spinacia oleracea ) produced in an aquaponic integrated system along with rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ), under three plant densities (V1 – 59 plants/m 2 , V2 – 48plants/m 2 and V3 – 39plants/m 2 ). Materials and methods: The experimental design consist in a recirculating aquaculture system with 12 growing units, mechanical and Biological Water Treatment units and four aquaponic units. Three plants densities were used (59, 48 and 39plants/m 2 ). A fish stocking density of 136fish/m 3 was used. Plants initial and final biomass was taken and a series of periodic measurements were made. Chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids, ash and dry matter were determined from spinach leaf. Results: The plant biomass gain registered good values and the quality of final plant products, given by the chlorophyll a, b , carotenoids and dry matter content were in the optimal variation interval, comparing to market spinach. Significant differences (p<0.05) between variants were observed. Conclusion: In the present research work, we demonstrated that significant differences (p<0.05) were recorded in terms of growth performance between the three experimental variants and that the quality of spinach growth in an integrated aquaponic system with rainbow trout is similar to that of the market spinach.

Christian Kunze – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • MANAGEMENT OF PASSIVE Biological Water Treatment SYSTEMS FOR MINE EFFLUENTS
    Advanced Science and Technology for Biological Decontamination of Sites Affected by Chemical and Radiological Nuclear Agents, 2020
    Co-Authors: Christian Kunze, Gunter Kieβig, Annette Küchler

    Abstract:

    This contribution describes the approach of WISUTEC, a subsidiary of the mine remediation company WISMUT, to passive Biological Water Treatment as a long-term solution to Water contamination problems at former Uranium mining and milling sites. The paper starts with an introduction into the WISMUT project, with special emphasis on Water management and Treatment in the closure and remediation process of decommissioned mining and milling sites, and illuminates the variety of Water-related problems within this framework. One of the peculiarities of mining and milling operations in Germany and Europe in general is the relatively high population density in the affected mining areas and the scarcity of land, compared to other typical mining regions worldwide. This also leads to strict requirement with respect to the technical solutions applied in mine closure and, in particular, to restrictions on the land surface available for semi-natural and constructed wetlands. The regulatory expectations with respect to compliance with discharge standards and long-term stability are high, and command highly effective solutions on a small area. Apart from rather general aspects, the paper also highlights the practical experience from design, construction and the first years of operation of the Pohla wetland as a well-suited example. In particular, the present paper shows the pitfalls and potential problems including some realistic cost estimates which are often hidden behind the general, overoptimistic statement of “maintenance-free, zero-cost” passive Water Treatment systems.

  • Management of passive Biological Water Treatment systems for mine effluents Short title: Management of Biological mine effluent Treatment systems
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Christian Kunze, Annette Küchler

    Abstract:

    This contribution describes the approach of WISUTEC, a subsidiary of the mine remediation company WISMUT, to passive Biological Water Treatment as a long-term solution to Water contamination problems at former Uranium mining and milling sites. The paper starts with an introduction into the WISMUT project, with special emphasis on Water management and Treatment in the closure and remediation process of decommissioned mining and milling sites, and illuminates the variety of Water-related problems within this framework. One of the peculiarities of mining and milling operations in Germany and Europe in general is the relatively high population density in the affected mining areas and the scarcity of land, compared to other typical mining regions worldwide. This also leads to strict requirement with respect to the technical solutions applied in mine closure and, in particular, to restrictions on the land surface available for semi-natural and constructed wetlands. The regulatory expectations with respect to compliance with discharge standards and long-term stability are high, and command highly effective solutions on a small area. Apart from rather general aspects, the paper also highlights the practical experience from design, construction and the first years of operation of the Pohla wetland as a well-suited example.

  • Long-term Stability and Resilience of Passive Mine Water Treatment Facilities: A Joint Experimental and Simulation Approach
    Uranium in the Aquatic Environment, 2020
    Co-Authors: Christian Kunze, Franz Glombitza, André Gerth, Gunter Kiessig, Annett Küchler

    Abstract:

    Passive Water Treatment technologies such as wetlands at abandoned mining sites are an attractive and economically sensible alternative to conventional technologies for long time-scales and relatively small contaminant loads. However, long-term stability and resilience with respect to external perturbations are a major concern for both wetland operators and regulators. In this paper, we outline a research project which addresses questions such as resilience and recovery behaviour of passive Biological Water Treatment systems.

Andrey V. Dyakov – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • WF-IoT – Biotechnology and Internet of Things for green smart city application
    2016 IEEE 3rd World Forum on Internet of Things (WF-IoT), 2016
    Co-Authors: Pavel M. Gotovtsev, Andrey V. Dyakov

    Abstract:

    This paper gives a breath overview of application of several biotechnologies in smart city and the ways of its inclusion in internet of things. Biosensors for environmental control local Biological Water Treatment systems and photobioreactors for building a discussed as a part of internet of things. Brief overview of future biotechnology that can find application in green smart city conception also presented.

  • Biotechnology and Internet of Things for green smart city application
    2016 IEEE 3rd World Forum on Internet of Things (WF-IoT), 2016
    Co-Authors: Pavel M. Gotovtsev, Andrey V. Dyakov

    Abstract:

    This paper gives a breath overview of application of several biotechnologies in smart city and the ways of its inclusion in internet of things. Biosensors for environmental control local Biological Water Treatment systems and photobioreactors for building a discussed as a part of internet of things. Brief overview of future biotechnology that can find application in green smart city conception also presented.