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Biomagnification

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Derek C G Muir – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • dietary uptake patterns affect bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of hydrophobic organic compounds in fish
    Environmental Science & Technology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Haotian Wang, Derek C G Muir, Zixuan Wang, Yawei Zhai, Yang Li, Dahui Wang, Zhifeng Yang, John C Crittenden

    Abstract:

    Biomagnification of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) increases the eco-environmental risks they pose. Here, we gained mechanistic insights into Biomagnification of deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs-d10) in zebrafish with carefully controlled water (ng L–1) by a passive dosing method and dietary exposures using pre-exposed Daphnia magna and fish food. A new bioaccumulation kinetic model for fish was established to take into account discrete dietary uptake, while the frequently used model regards dietary uptake as a continuous process. We found that when freely dissolved concentrations of the PAHs-d10 were constant in water, the intake amount of the PAHs-d10 played an important role in affecting their steady-state concentrations in zebrafish, and there was a peak concentration in zebrafish after each dietary uptake. Moreover, considering the randomness of predation, the Monte Carlo simulation results showed that the probabilities of Biomagnification of the PAHs-d10 in zebrafish increased…

  • factors affecting biotic mercury concentrations and Biomagnification through lake food webs in the canadian high arctic
    Science of The Total Environment, 2015
    Co-Authors: Gretchen L Lescord, Karen A Kidd, Xiaowa Wang, Nelson J Odriscoll, Jane L Kirk, Derek C G Muir

    Abstract:

    In temperate regions of Canada, mercury (Hg) concentrations in biota and the magnitude of Hg Biomagnification through food webs vary between neighboring lakes and are related to water chemistry variables and physical lake features. However, few studies have examined factors affecting the variable Hg concentrations in landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) or the Biomagnification of Hg through their food webs. We estimated the food web structure of six high Arctic lakes near Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada, using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes and measured Hg (total Hg (THg) in char, the only fish species, and methylmercury (MeHg) in chironomids and zooplankton) concentrations in biota collected in 2010 and 2011. Across lakes, δ13C showed that benthic carbon (chironomids) was the dominant food source for char. Regression models of log Hg versus δ15N (of char and benthic invertebrates) showed positive and significant slopes, indicting Hg Biomagnification in all lakes, and higher slopes in some lakes than others. However, no principal components (PC) generated using all water chemistry data and physical characteristics of the lakes predicted the different slopes. The PC dominated by aqueous ions was a negative predictor of MeHg concentrations in chironomids, suggesting that water chemistry affects Hg bioavailability and MeHg concentrations in these lower-trophic-level organisms. Furthermore, regression intercepts were predicted by the PCs dominated by catchment area, aqueous ions, and MeHg. Weaker relationships were also found between THg in small char or MeHg in pelagic invertebrates and the PCs dominated by catchment area, and aqueous nitrate and MeHg. Results from these high Arctic lakes suggest that Hg Biomagnification differs between systems and that their physical and chemical characteristics affect Hg concentrations in lower-trophic-level biota.

  • mercury Biomagnification through food webs is affected by physical and chemical characteristics of lakes
    Environmental Science & Technology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Meredith G Clayden, Derek C G Muir, Karen A Kidd, Jane L Kirk, Nelson J Odriscoll

    Abstract:

    Mercury (Hg) contamination in aquatic systems remains a global concern because the organic form, methyl Hg (MeHg), can biomagnify to harmful concentrations in fish, fish-eating wildlife, and humans. Food web transfer of MeHg has been explored using models of log MeHg versus relative trophic position (nitrogen isotopes, δ15N), but regression slopes vary across systems for unknown reasons. In this study, MeHg Biomagnification was determined for 11 lake food webs in Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia, Canada, and compared to physical and chemical lake characteristics using principal component and multiple regression analyses. MeHg Biomagnification (regression slopes of log MeHg versus baseline-adjusted δ15N for fishes and invertebrates) varied significantly across lakes and was higher in systems with lower aqueous nutrient/MeHg/chloride scores. This is one of the largest, consistent data sets available on MeHg Biomagnification through temperate lake food webs and the first study to use a principal compone…

Ichiro Takeuchi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Stable isotope-guided analysis of Biomagnification profiles of arsenic species in a tropical mangrove ecosystem.
    Marine pollution bulletin, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nguyen Phuc Cam Tu, Shinsuke Tanabe, Bui Cach Tuyen, Tetsuro Agusa, Nguyen Ngoc Ha, Ichiro Takeuchi

    Abstract:

    We performed stable carbon and nitrogen-guided analyses of Biomagnification profiles of arsenic (As) species, including total As, lipid-soluble As, eight water-soluble As compounds (arsenobetaine (AB), arsenocholine (AC), tetramethylarsonium ion (TETRA), trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), arsenate (As[V]), and arsenite (As[III])), and non-extracted As in a tropical mangrove ecosystem in the Ba Ria Vung Tau, South Vietnam. Arsenobetaine was the predominant As species (65-96% of water-soluble As). Simple linear regression slopes of log-transformed concentrations of total As, As fractions or individual As compounds on stable nitrogen isotopic ratio (δ15N) values are regarded as indices of Biomagnification. In this ecosystem, lipid-soluble As (slope, 0.130) and AB (slope, 0.108) were significantly biomagnified through the food web; total As and other water-soluble As compounds were not. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on Biomagnification profiles of As compounds from a tropical mangrove ecosystem.

  • analysis of Biomagnification of persistent organic pollutants in the aquatic food web of the mekong delta south vietnam using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes
    Chemosphere, 2008
    Co-Authors: Tokutaka Ikemoto, Nguyen Phuc Cam Tu, Michio X Watanabe, Noboru Okuda, Koji Omori, Shinsuke Tanabe, Bui Cach Tuyen, Ichiro Takeuchi

    Abstract:

    Abstract The present study elucidated the Biomagnification profiles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) through a tropical aquatic food web of Vietnam based on trophic characterization using stable nitrogen analysis. Various biological samples collected from the main stream of the Mekong Delta were provided for the analysis for both POPs, and stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios. Of the POPs analyzed, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs) were the predominant contaminants with concentrations ranging from 0.058 to 12 ng/g wet weight, followed by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at 0.017–8.9 ng/g, chlordane compounds (CHLs) at 0.0043–0.76 ng/g, tris-4-chlorophenyl methane (TCPMe) at N.D.–0.26 ng/g, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) at N.D.–0.20 ng/g and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) at 0.0021–0.096 ng/g. Significant positive increases of concentrations in DDTs, CHLs, and TCPMe against the stable nitrogen ratio (δ 15 N) were detected, while, concentrations of HCHs and HCB showed no significant increase. The slopes of the regression equations between the log-transformed concentrations of these POPs and δ 15 N were used as indices of Biomagnification. The slopes of the POPs for which positive Biomagnification was detected ranged from 0.149 to 0.177 on a wet weight basis. The slopes of DDTs and CHLs were less than those reported for a marine food web of the Arctic Ocean, indicating that less Biomagnification had occurred in the tropical food web. Of the isomers of CHLs, unlike the studies of the Arctic Ocean, oxychlordane did not undergo significant Biomagnification through the food web of the Mekong Delta. This difference is considered to be due to a lack of marine mammals, which might metabolize cis – and trans -chlordane to oxychlordane, in the Mekong Delta ecosystem. The Biomagnification profile of TCPMe is reported for the first time in the present study.

  • Biomagnification of trace elements in the aquatic food web in the mekong delta south vietnam using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Tokutaka Ikemoto, Nguyen Phuc Cam Tu, Noboru Okuda, Koji Omori, Shinsuke Tanabe, Bui Cach Tuyen, Akihisa Iwata, Ichiro Takeuchi

    Abstract:

    In the present study, we report the concentrations of 21 trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, Pb, and Bi), as well as the results of the analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, of the various biota that make up the food web in the main stream of the Mekong Delta near Can Tho, South Vietnam. A significant trophic level-dependent increase was found in concentrations of Se, Rb, and Hg with increasing δ15N, indicating that an overall Biomagnification of these elements occurred. However, the increase of Hg concentration per trophic level was lower than in previous studies. In contrast, the concentration of Mn showed an opposite trend in the food web of the Mekong Delta. In addition to these overall trends, the present study revealed that the Biomagnification profiles of trace metals differ between crustaceans and fishes; concentrations of Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Tl, and Pb were significantly higher in crustaceans, whereas fishes showed higher concentrations of Cr, Rb, and Hg (trophic level determined by δ15N). The differences in the Biomagnification profile between the major taxa might be attributed to differences in metal accumulation and in detoxification abilities such as possessing a metal-binding protein, e.g., metallothionein (MT).

Karen A Kidd – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • factors affecting biotic mercury concentrations and Biomagnification through lake food webs in the canadian high arctic
    Science of The Total Environment, 2015
    Co-Authors: Gretchen L Lescord, Karen A Kidd, Xiaowa Wang, Nelson J Odriscoll, Jane L Kirk, Derek C G Muir

    Abstract:

    In temperate regions of Canada, mercury (Hg) concentrations in biota and the magnitude of Hg Biomagnification through food webs vary between neighboring lakes and are related to water chemistry variables and physical lake features. However, few studies have examined factors affecting the variable Hg concentrations in landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) or the Biomagnification of Hg through their food webs. We estimated the food web structure of six high Arctic lakes near Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada, using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes and measured Hg (total Hg (THg) in char, the only fish species, and methylmercury (MeHg) in chironomids and zooplankton) concentrations in biota collected in 2010 and 2011. Across lakes, δ13C showed that benthic carbon (chironomids) was the dominant food source for char. Regression models of log Hg versus δ15N (of char and benthic invertebrates) showed positive and significant slopes, indicting Hg Biomagnification in all lakes, and higher slopes in some lakes than others. However, no principal components (PC) generated using all water chemistry data and physical characteristics of the lakes predicted the different slopes. The PC dominated by aqueous ions was a negative predictor of MeHg concentrations in chironomids, suggesting that water chemistry affects Hg bioavailability and MeHg concentrations in these lower-trophic-level organisms. Furthermore, regression intercepts were predicted by the PCs dominated by catchment area, aqueous ions, and MeHg. Weaker relationships were also found between THg in small char or MeHg in pelagic invertebrates and the PCs dominated by catchment area, and aqueous nitrate and MeHg. Results from these high Arctic lakes suggest that Hg Biomagnification differs between systems and that their physical and chemical characteristics affect Hg concentrations in lower-trophic-level biota.

  • Mercury bioaccumulation and Biomagnification in a small Arctic polynya ecosystem.
    The Science of the total environment, 2014
    Co-Authors: Meredith G Clayden, Karen A Kidd, Lilianne M Arsenault, Nelson J O'driscoll, Mark L Mallory

    Abstract:

    Recurring polynyas are important areas of biological productivity and feeding grounds for seabirds and mammals in the Arctic marine environment. In this study, we examined food web structure (using carbon and nitrogen isotopes, δ(13)C and δ(15)N) and mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation and Biomagnification in a small recurring polynya ecosystem near Nasaruvaalik Island (Nunavut, Canada). Methyl Hg (MeHg) concentrations increased by more than 50-fold from copepods (Calanus hyperboreus) to Arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea), the abundant predators at this site. The Biomagnification of MeHg through members of the food web – using the slope of log MeHg versus δ(15)N – was 0.157 from copepods (C. hyperboreus) to fish. This slope was higher (0.267) when seabird chicks were included in the analyses. Collectively, our results indicate that MeHg Biomagnification is occurring in this small polynya and that its trophic transfer is at the lower end of the range of estimates from other Arctic marine ecosystems. In addition, we measured Hg concentrations in some poorly studied members of Arctic marine food webs [e.g. Arctic alligatorfish (Ulcina olrikii) and jellyfish, Medusozoa], and found that MeHg concentrations in jellyfish were lower than expected given their trophic position. Overall, these findings provide fundamental information about food web structure and mercury contamination in a small Arctic polynya, which will inform future research in such ecosystems and provide a baseline against which to assess changes over time resulting from environmental disturbance.

  • mercury Biomagnification through food webs is affected by physical and chemical characteristics of lakes
    Environmental Science & Technology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Meredith G Clayden, Derek C G Muir, Karen A Kidd, Jane L Kirk, Nelson J Odriscoll

    Abstract:

    Mercury (Hg) contamination in aquatic systems remains a global concern because the organic form, methyl Hg (MeHg), can biomagnify to harmful concentrations in fish, fish-eating wildlife, and humans. Food web transfer of MeHg has been explored using models of log MeHg versus relative trophic position (nitrogen isotopes, δ15N), but regression slopes vary across systems for unknown reasons. In this study, MeHg Biomagnification was determined for 11 lake food webs in Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia, Canada, and compared to physical and chemical lake characteristics using principal component and multiple regression analyses. MeHg Biomagnification (regression slopes of log MeHg versus baseline-adjusted δ15N for fishes and invertebrates) varied significantly across lakes and was higher in systems with lower aqueous nutrient/MeHg/chloride scores. This is one of the largest, consistent data sets available on MeHg Biomagnification through temperate lake food webs and the first study to use a principal compone…