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Bioterrorism Preparedness

The Experts below are selected from a list of 876 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Tracee Treadwell – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • AMIA – Applied IT for the CDC’s Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Lori Hutwagner, Tracee Treadwell, G. Matthew Seeman, Jennifer E. Mcgehee, David A Bray

    Abstract:

    Early identification of an outbreak is essential, as rapid public health response minimizes morbidity and mortality. The Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS) is a software solution designed to aid in the early identification of Bioterrorism events and other disease outbreaks. EARS implements established aberration detection methodologies. In parallel and supporting the laboratory side of response, the LRN Geographic Information System (GIS) map server was created as a way of visually providing critical data through the CDC intranet on the nation’s laboratory readiness, displaying many data elements in a unified fashion.

  • the Bioterrorism Preparedness and response early aberration reporting system ears
    Journal of Urban Health-bulletin of The New York Academy of Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lori Hutwagner, William W Thompson, Matthew G Seeman, Tracee Treadwell

    Abstract:

    Data from public health surveillance systems can provide meaningful measures of population risks for disease, disability, and death. Analysis and evaluation of these surveillance data help public health practitioners react to important health events in a timely manner both locally and nationally. Aberration detection methods allow the rapid assessment of changes in frequencies and rates of different health outcomes and the characterization of unusual trends or clusters.

  • The Bioterrorism Preparedness and response Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS)
    Journal of Urban Health, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lori Hutwagner, William Thompson, G. Matthew Seeman, Tracee Treadwell

    Abstract:

    Data from public health surveillance systems can provide meaningful measures of population risks for disease, disability, and death. Analysis and evaluation of these surveillance data help public health practitioners react to important health events in a timely manner both locally and nationally. Aberration detection methods allow the rapid assessment of changes in frequencies and rates of different health outcomes and the characterization of unusual trends or clusters. The Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention allows the analysis of public health surveillance data using available aberration detection methods. The primary purpose of EARS is to provide national, state, and local health departments with several alternative, aberration detection methods. EARS helps assist local and state health officials to focus limited resources on appropriate activities during epidemiological investigations of important public health events. Finally, EARS allows end users to select validated aberration detection methods and modify sensitivity and specificity thresholds to values considered to be of public health importance by local and state health departments.

Lori Hutwagner – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • AMIA – Applied IT for the CDC’s Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Lori Hutwagner, Tracee Treadwell, G. Matthew Seeman, Jennifer E. Mcgehee, David A Bray

    Abstract:

    Early identification of an outbreak is essential, as rapid public health response minimizes morbidity and mortality. The Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS) is a software solution designed to aid in the early identification of Bioterrorism events and other disease outbreaks. EARS implements established aberration detection methodologies. In parallel and supporting the laboratory side of response, the LRN Geographic Information System (GIS) map server was created as a way of visually providing critical data through the CDC intranet on the nation’s laboratory readiness, displaying many data elements in a unified fashion.

  • the Bioterrorism Preparedness and response early aberration reporting system ears
    Journal of Urban Health-bulletin of The New York Academy of Medicine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lori Hutwagner, William W Thompson, Matthew G Seeman, Tracee Treadwell

    Abstract:

    Data from public health surveillance systems can provide meaningful measures of population risks for disease, disability, and death. Analysis and evaluation of these surveillance data help public health practitioners react to important health events in a timely manner both locally and nationally. Aberration detection methods allow the rapid assessment of changes in frequencies and rates of different health outcomes and the characterization of unusual trends or clusters.

  • The Bioterrorism Preparedness and response Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS)
    Journal of Urban Health, 2003
    Co-Authors: Lori Hutwagner, William Thompson, G. Matthew Seeman, Tracee Treadwell

    Abstract:

    Data from public health surveillance systems can provide meaningful measures of population risks for disease, disability, and death. Analysis and evaluation of these surveillance data help public health practitioners react to important health events in a timely manner both locally and nationally. Aberration detection methods allow the rapid assessment of changes in frequencies and rates of different health outcomes and the characterization of unusual trends or clusters. The Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention allows the analysis of public health surveillance data using available aberration detection methods. The primary purpose of EARS is to provide national, state, and local health departments with several alternative, aberration detection methods. EARS helps assist local and state health officials to focus limited resources on appropriate activities during epidemiological investigations of important public health events. Finally, EARS allows end users to select validated aberration detection methods and modify sensitivity and specificity thresholds to values considered to be of public health importance by local and state health departments.

Matthew K Wynia – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • physicians Preparedness for Bioterrorism and other public health priorities
    Academic Emergency Medicine, 2006
    Co-Authors: Caleb G Alexander, Matthew K Wynia, Luke G Larkin

    Abstract:

    Objectives

    Potential Bioterrorism challenges policy makers to balance competing public health priorities. Earlier surveys showed low physician Bioterrorism Preparedness but did not assess physicians’ general public health Preparedness, compare the Preparedness of emergency and primary care physicians, or assess temporal trends.

    Methods

    This was a national, cross-sectional, random-sample survey conducted in 2003.

    Results

    Overall, 744 of 1,200 eligible physicians responded (response rate, 62%). Of these, 58% of emergency physician respondents and 48% of primary care physician respondents reported having learned a lot about responding to bioterror since September 11, 2001 (p < 0.01). However, only 43% of emergency physicians and 21% of primary care physicians agreed they are generally “well prepared to play a role in responding to a bioterror attack” (p < 0.001). Beliefs about balancing public health priorities were similar among emergency and primary care respondents. Seventy-eight percent of respondents believed that local health care systems need to be prepared for Bioterrorism, and 92% believed that local health care systems need to be prepared for natural epidemics. By contrast, only 23% and 46% of respondents reported that their local health care systems are well prepared for Bioterrorism and natural epidemics, respectively. Meanwhile, 77% agreed that “influenza is a greater threat to public health than Bioterrorism,” and 21% reported that Bioterrorism Preparedness efforts are diverting resources from more important public health problems.

    Conclusions

    In 2003, most emergency and primary care physicians reported that they and their local health care systems were not yet well prepared to respond to a bioterror attack, and many believed that more resources should go toward preparing for natural epidemics. These findings highlight the importance of expanding Bioterrorism Preparedness efforts to improve the public health system more broadly.