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Birth Control

The Experts below are selected from a list of 180 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Patricia Dittus – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • adolescent perceptions of maternal approval of Birth Control and sexual risk behavior
    American Journal of Public Health, 2000
    Co-Authors: James Jaccard, Patricia Dittus

    Abstract:

    Objectives. This study examined the relationship between adolescent perceptions of maternal approval of the use of Birth Control and sexual outcomes across a 12-month period. Methods. A subsample of the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health database was used in the context of a prospective design. Approximately 10 000 students in grades 7 to 11 were interviewed twice, 1 year apart. Results. Adolescent perceptions of maternal approval of Birth Control were associated with an increased likelihood of sexual intercourse over the next 12 months for virgins at wave 1. The perceptions also were related to an increase in Birth Control use but showed an ambiguous relation to the probability of pregnancy. High relationship satisfaction between adolescents and mothers was associated with a higher probability of Birth Control use and a lower probability of both sexual intercourse and pregnancy. Conclusions. The results suggest that perceived parental approval of Birth Control may increase the probability of sexual activity in some adolescents. “Safer sex” messages must be conveyed by parents with thought and care. (Am J Public Health. 2000;90:1426‐1430) Recently, interest in the role of parents in influencing the sexual behavior of adolescents has increased.

Sonia Oreffice – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Birth Control and female empowerment an equilibrium analysis
    Journal of Political Economy, 2008
    Co-Authors: Pierreandre Chiappori, Sonia Oreffice

    Abstract:

    We analyze, from a theoretical perspective, the impact of innovations in Birth Control technology on intrahousehold allocation of resources. We consider a model of frictionless matching on the marriage market in which men, as well as women, differ in their preferences for children; moreover, men, unlike women, must marry to enjoy fatherhood. We show that more efficient Birth Control technologies generally increase the “power,” hence the welfare, of all women, including those who do not use them. This “empowerment” effect requires that the new technology be available to single women. An innovation reserved to married women may result in a “disempowerment” effect.

James Jaccard – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • adolescent perceptions of maternal approval of Birth Control and sexual risk behavior
    American Journal of Public Health, 2000
    Co-Authors: James Jaccard, Patricia Dittus

    Abstract:

    Objectives. This study examined the relationship between adolescent perceptions of maternal approval of the use of Birth Control and sexual outcomes across a 12-month period. Methods. A subsample of the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health database was used in the context of a prospective design. Approximately 10 000 students in grades 7 to 11 were interviewed twice, 1 year apart. Results. Adolescent perceptions of maternal approval of Birth Control were associated with an increased likelihood of sexual intercourse over the next 12 months for virgins at wave 1. The perceptions also were related to an increase in Birth Control use but showed an ambiguous relation to the probability of pregnancy. High relationship satisfaction between adolescents and mothers was associated with a higher probability of Birth Control use and a lower probability of both sexual intercourse and pregnancy. Conclusions. The results suggest that perceived parental approval of Birth Control may increase the probability of sexual activity in some adolescents. “Safer sex” messages must be conveyed by parents with thought and care. (Am J Public Health. 2000;90:1426‐1430) Recently, interest in the role of parents in influencing the sexual behavior of adolescents has increased.