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Bithynia

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Ross H Andrews – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • influence of water irrigation schemes and seasonality on transmission dynamics of opisthorchis viverrini in the snail intermediate host Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in rice paddy fields in northeast thailand
    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kulthida Kopolrat, Trevor N Petney, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Ross H Andrews, Nadda Kiatsopit, Smarn Tesana, Jutamas Namsanor, Nonglak Laoprom

    Abstract:

    : Opisthorchis viverrini is a fish-borne zoonotic trematode that causes significant public health problems in Southeast Asia. Its life cycle requires Bithynia snails as the first intermediate hosts, fish, and human and/or carnivore hosts. This study assessed impacts of land use practice for rice cultivation and seasonality on the transmission dynamics of O. viverrini in Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in rice paddy field habitats. The transmission of O. viverrini cercariae in B. s. goniomphalos was monitored at monthly intervals over a 4-year period from January 2010 to December 2013. From a total of 59,727 snails examined by standard cercarial shedding, the prevalence of O. viverrini was 0.7% (range, 0.0-4.1%). The prevalence of O. viverrini infection in B. s. goniomphalos varied with the amount of rainfall, with peaks of infection occurring in the cool-dry season, that is, after each rainy season. A shift of peak prevalence from cool-dry to hot-dry season observed in 2013 was associated with the increase in preceding water irrigation to support the production of second annual rice crop. Significant positive correlations were found between the prevalence and intensity of cercarial infection and the size of snails. Our results revealed substantial variation between years so that to have a clear understanding of the population dynamics of this complex system, studies should be conducted over an extended period (> 1 year). Results from this study highlight that water irrigation schemes in rice paddy cultivation and seasonality have a significant effect on the prevalence of O. viverrini in B. s. goniomphalos.

  • genetic structure and geographical variation of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos sensu lato gastropoda bithyniidae the snail intermediate host of opisthorchis viverrini sensu lato digenea opisthorchiidae in the lower mekong basin revealed by mitochond
    International Journal for Parasitology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Chairat Tantrawatpan, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Weerachai Saijuntha, Naruemon Bunchom, Warong Suksavate, Warayutt Pilap, Tanapipat Walalite, Takeshi Agatsuma, Wittaya Tawong, Ross H Andrews

    Abstract:

    Abstract The freshwater snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos sensu lato is widely distributed in the Lower Mekong Basin where it acts as the first intermediate host of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, a group 1 carcinogen causing cholangiocarcinoma. This study explores the genetic structure and geographical variation of B. s. goniomphalos from eight previously studied catchments and eight new catchments. These catchments belong to five previously studied catchment systems and one new catchment system (Tonlesap) in the Lower Mekong Basin. Two new catchment systems, Prachin Buri and Bang Pakong from eastern and central Thailand, respectively, were also examined. We collected 289 specimens of B. s. goniomphalos from 15 previously studied localities and 18 new localities in Thailand, Lao PDR (People’s Democratic Republic), and Cambodia. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were used to determine genetic variation. Classification of haplotypes specified 100 at the cox1 locus and 15 at the rrnL locus. Comparison between 16 catchment populations found significant genetic differences (ФST) between all populations. The phylogenetic tree and haplotype network analyses classified B. s. goniomphalos into three evolutionary lineages (lineage I–III). Lineage I contained B. s. goniomphalos from the Mekong, Chi, Mun, Prachin Buri and Bang Pakong catchments in Thailand, including the Nam Ngum catchment in Lao PDR. Lineage II contained all specimens from the Tonlesap catchment, whereas lineage III contained specimens from the Mekong and Sea Bang Heang catchments in Thailand and Lao PDR, respectively. Interestingly, Bithynia siamensis siamensis was placed between lineages I and II of B. s. goniomphalos. This study supports the hypothesis that B. s. goniomphalos is a species complex containing at least three distinct evolutionary lineages in the Lower Mekong Basin, and that comprehensive molecular genetic analyses need to be conducted to further our understanding of the evolutionary and systematic relationships of these Bithynia snail taxa.

  • Cercarial emergence patterns for Opisthorchis viverrini sensu lato infecting Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos from Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand
    Parasitology Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Nonglak Laoprom, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Ross H Andrews, Nadda Kiatsopit, Kulthida Kopolrat, Jutamas Namsanor, Trevor N Petney

    Abstract:

    Opisthorchis viverrini sensu lato is a food-borne trematode which is classified as a class 1 carcinogen, with infection potentially leading to cholangiocarcinoma. Snails of the genus Bithynia act as the first intermediate hosts and an amplifying point in the parasite life cycle. In order to investigate seasonal effect on transmission dynamics of O. viverrini in Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos , cercarial emergence and output profiles were monitored at different season. A total of 4533 snails originating from Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand, collected during the three main seasons, were analyzed for O. viverrini s.l. infection. Emergence of O. viverrini s.l. cercariae from snails was monitored daily from 06:00 to 18:00 h for seven consecutive days. The prevalence of infection in the snails was highest in the hot-dry season and declined in the rainy and cool-dry seasons. Peak cercarial emergence occurred between 08:00 and 10:00 h during the rainy and cool-dry seasons and between 10:00 and 12:00 h during the hot-dry season. The cercarial output was highest in the hot-dry season, similar to a previous study from Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR). Average cercarial output/snail in Thailand was higher than in Lao PDR. The number of cercariae emerging from the snails was strongly related to snail size, but the relationship between prevalence of infection and snail size differed between seasons. Observed discrepancies in the emergence patterns and per capita cercarial release may reflect differences in environmental, snail, and/or parasite factors particularly biological characteristics between the cryptic species of O. viverrini s.l. and B. s. goniomphalos from Thailand and Lao PDR.

Paiboon Sithithaworn – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • influence of water irrigation schemes and seasonality on transmission dynamics of opisthorchis viverrini in the snail intermediate host Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in rice paddy fields in northeast thailand
    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kulthida Kopolrat, Trevor N Petney, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Ross H Andrews, Nadda Kiatsopit, Smarn Tesana, Jutamas Namsanor, Nonglak Laoprom

    Abstract:

    : Opisthorchis viverrini is a fish-borne zoonotic trematode that causes significant public health problems in Southeast Asia. Its life cycle requires Bithynia snails as the first intermediate hosts, fish, and human and/or carnivore hosts. This study assessed impacts of land use practice for rice cultivation and seasonality on the transmission dynamics of O. viverrini in Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in rice paddy field habitats. The transmission of O. viverrini cercariae in B. s. goniomphalos was monitored at monthly intervals over a 4-year period from January 2010 to December 2013. From a total of 59,727 snails examined by standard cercarial shedding, the prevalence of O. viverrini was 0.7% (range, 0.0-4.1%). The prevalence of O. viverrini infection in B. s. goniomphalos varied with the amount of rainfall, with peaks of infection occurring in the cool-dry season, that is, after each rainy season. A shift of peak prevalence from cool-dry to hot-dry season observed in 2013 was associated with the increase in preceding water irrigation to support the production of second annual rice crop. Significant positive correlations were found between the prevalence and intensity of cercarial infection and the size of snails. Our results revealed substantial variation between years so that to have a clear understanding of the population dynamics of this complex system, studies should be conducted over an extended period (> 1 year). Results from this study highlight that water irrigation schemes in rice paddy cultivation and seasonality have a significant effect on the prevalence of O. viverrini in B. s. goniomphalos.

  • genetic structure and geographical variation of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos sensu lato gastropoda bithyniidae the snail intermediate host of opisthorchis viverrini sensu lato digenea opisthorchiidae in the lower mekong basin revealed by mitochond
    International Journal for Parasitology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Chairat Tantrawatpan, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Weerachai Saijuntha, Naruemon Bunchom, Warong Suksavate, Warayutt Pilap, Tanapipat Walalite, Takeshi Agatsuma, Wittaya Tawong, Ross H Andrews

    Abstract:

    Abstract The freshwater snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos sensu lato is widely distributed in the Lower Mekong Basin where it acts as the first intermediate host of the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, a group 1 carcinogen causing cholangiocarcinoma. This study explores the genetic structure and geographical variation of B. s. goniomphalos from eight previously studied catchments and eight new catchments. These catchments belong to five previously studied catchment systems and one new catchment system (Tonlesap) in the Lower Mekong Basin. Two new catchment systems, Prachin Buri and Bang Pakong from eastern and central Thailand, respectively, were also examined. We collected 289 specimens of B. s. goniomphalos from 15 previously studied localities and 18 new localities in Thailand, Lao PDR (People’s Democratic Republic), and Cambodia. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were used to determine genetic variation. Classification of haplotypes specified 100 at the cox1 locus and 15 at the rrnL locus. Comparison between 16 catchment populations found significant genetic differences (ФST) between all populations. The phylogenetic tree and haplotype network analyses classified B. s. goniomphalos into three evolutionary lineages (lineage I–III). Lineage I contained B. s. goniomphalos from the Mekong, Chi, Mun, Prachin Buri and Bang Pakong catchments in Thailand, including the Nam Ngum catchment in Lao PDR. Lineage II contained all specimens from the Tonlesap catchment, whereas lineage III contained specimens from the Mekong and Sea Bang Heang catchments in Thailand and Lao PDR, respectively. Interestingly, Bithynia siamensis siamensis was placed between lineages I and II of B. s. goniomphalos. This study supports the hypothesis that B. s. goniomphalos is a species complex containing at least three distinct evolutionary lineages in the Lower Mekong Basin, and that comprehensive molecular genetic analyses need to be conducted to further our understanding of the evolutionary and systematic relationships of these Bithynia snail taxa.

  • culture of fecal indicator bacteria from snail intestinal tubes as a tool for assessing the risk of opisthorchis viverrini infection in Bithynia snail habitat
    Parasites & Vectors, 2019
    Co-Authors: Courtney C Nawrocki, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Nadda Kiatsopit, Jutamas Namsanor, Elizabeth J Carlton

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Like many trematodes of human health significance, the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, is spread via fecal contamination of snail habitat. Methods for assessing snail exposure to fecal waste can improve our ability to identify snail infection hotspots and potential sources of snail infections. We evaluated the feasibility of culturing fecal indicator bacteria from Bithynia snail intestinal tubes as a method for assessing snail exposure to fecal waste. Snails and water samples were collected from a site with a historically high prevalence of O. viverrini infected snails (“hotspot” site) and a site with historically no infected snails (“non-hotspot” site) on two sampling days. Snails were tested for O. viverrini and a stratified random sample of snails from each site was selected for intestinal tube removal and culture of gut contents for the fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli. Water samples were tested for E. coli and nearby households were surveyed to assess sources of fecal contamination. RESULTS: At the hotspot site, 26 of 2833 Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails were infected with O. viverrini compared to 0 of 1421 snails at the non-hotspot site. A total of 186 snails were dissected and cultured. Escherichia coli were detected in the guts of 20% of uninfected snails, 4% of O. viverrini-positive snails and 8% of snails not examined for cercarial infection at the hotspot site. Only one of 75 snails from the non-hotspot site was positive for E. coli. Accounting for sampling weights, snails at the hotspot site were more likely to have gut E. coli than snails from the non-hotspot site. The concentration of fecal indicator bacteria in surface water was higher at the hotspot vs non-hotspot site on only the first sampling day. CONCLUSIONS: Fecal indicator bacteria can be detected in the intestinal tubes of Bithynia snails. The presence of fecal indicator bacteria in Bithynia snail guts may indicate risk of O. viverrini infection in snail populations. This method has the potential to aid in identifying locations and time windows of peak snail infection risk and may be applicable to other trematodes of human-health significance.

Trevor N Petney – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • influence of water irrigation schemes and seasonality on transmission dynamics of opisthorchis viverrini in the snail intermediate host Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in rice paddy fields in northeast thailand
    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kulthida Kopolrat, Trevor N Petney, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Ross H Andrews, Nadda Kiatsopit, Smarn Tesana, Jutamas Namsanor, Nonglak Laoprom

    Abstract:

    : Opisthorchis viverrini is a fish-borne zoonotic trematode that causes significant public health problems in Southeast Asia. Its life cycle requires Bithynia snails as the first intermediate hosts, fish, and human and/or carnivore hosts. This study assessed impacts of land use practice for rice cultivation and seasonality on the transmission dynamics of O. viverrini in Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in rice paddy field habitats. The transmission of O. viverrini cercariae in B. s. goniomphalos was monitored at monthly intervals over a 4-year period from January 2010 to December 2013. From a total of 59,727 snails examined by standard cercarial shedding, the prevalence of O. viverrini was 0.7% (range, 0.0-4.1%). The prevalence of O. viverrini infection in B. s. goniomphalos varied with the amount of rainfall, with peaks of infection occurring in the cool-dry season, that is, after each rainy season. A shift of peak prevalence from cool-dry to hot-dry season observed in 2013 was associated with the increase in preceding water irrigation to support the production of second annual rice crop. Significant positive correlations were found between the prevalence and intensity of cercarial infection and the size of snails. Our results revealed substantial variation between years so that to have a clear understanding of the population dynamics of this complex system, studies should be conducted over an extended period (> 1 year). Results from this study highlight that water irrigation schemes in rice paddy cultivation and seasonality have a significant effect on the prevalence of O. viverrini in B. s. goniomphalos.

  • Cercarial emergence patterns for Opisthorchis viverrini sensu lato infecting Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos from Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand
    Parasitology Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Nonglak Laoprom, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Ross H Andrews, Nadda Kiatsopit, Kulthida Kopolrat, Jutamas Namsanor, Trevor N Petney

    Abstract:

    Opisthorchis viverrini sensu lato is a food-borne trematode which is classified as a class 1 carcinogen, with infection potentially leading to cholangiocarcinoma. Snails of the genus Bithynia act as the first intermediate hosts and an amplifying point in the parasite life cycle. In order to investigate seasonal effect on transmission dynamics of O. viverrini in Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos , cercarial emergence and output profiles were monitored at different season. A total of 4533 snails originating from Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand, collected during the three main seasons, were analyzed for O. viverrini s.l. infection. Emergence of O. viverrini s.l. cercariae from snails was monitored daily from 06:00 to 18:00 h for seven consecutive days. The prevalence of infection in the snails was highest in the hot-dry season and declined in the rainy and cool-dry seasons. Peak cercarial emergence occurred between 08:00 and 10:00 h during the rainy and cool-dry seasons and between 10:00 and 12:00 h during the hot-dry season. The cercarial output was highest in the hot-dry season, similar to a previous study from Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR). Average cercarial output/snail in Thailand was higher than in Lao PDR. The number of cercariae emerging from the snails was strongly related to snail size, but the relationship between prevalence of infection and snail size differed between seasons. Observed discrepancies in the emergence patterns and per capita cercarial release may reflect differences in environmental, snail, and/or parasite factors particularly biological characteristics between the cryptic species of O. viverrini s.l. and B. s. goniomphalos from Thailand and Lao PDR.

  • seasonal cercarial emergence patterns of opisthorchis viverrini infecting Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos from vientiane province lao pdr
    Parasites & Vectors, 2014
    Co-Authors: Nadda Kiatsopit, Trevor N Petney, Paiboon Sithithaworn, Ross H Andrews, Kulthida Kopolrat

    Abstract:

    Background
    Snail intermediate hosts play a pivotal role in maintaining the life cycles of trematodes, including Opisthorchis viverrini. We investigated the emergence patterns of O. viverrini cercariae infecting Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos at foci in an endemic area in Vientiane Province, Lao PDR.