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Biventricular Device

The Experts below are selected from a list of 240 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Francisca Pons – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Left ventricular function and visual phase analysis with equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients with Biventricular Device
    European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 2008
    Co-Authors: Africa Muxí, Pilar Paredes, Lluis Mont, Francisco J. Setoain, Joan Duch, Silvia Fuertes, Jaime Ortín, Ernesto Diaz-infante, Francisca Pons

    Abstract:

    Purpose Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is a technique indicated in patients with moderate to severe heart failure and ventricular dyssynchrony. To evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and synchronisation changes after CRT with a Biventricular pacing implant, we used an equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA). Methods Fifty patients were studied. An ERNA was made 72 h and 6 months after the implant. Two acquisitions were performed: with the CRT Device connected and after disconnecting it. In the follow-up, responders were defined as those who had improved in accordance with various clinical variables. Quantitative changes in LVEF and visual changes in synchronisation (phase analysis) were studied comparing the two studies and also comparing the connected and disconnected modes. Results At 6 months, 30 patients were defined as responders. LVEF increased significantly at 6 months compared with the 72-h study only in responders. At 72 h, the number of patients showing a decrease in LVEF ( p  

  • Left ventricular function and visual phase analysis with equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients with Biventricular Device.
    European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 2008
    Co-Authors: Africa Muxí, Pilar Paredes, Lluis Mont, Joan Duch, Silvia Fuertes, Jaime Ortín, Ernesto Diaz-infante, Setoain Fj, Francisca Pons

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is a technique indicated in patients with moderate to severe heart failure and ventricular dyssynchrony. To evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and synchronisation changes after CRT with a Biventricular pacing implant, we used an equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA).

Africa Muxí – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Left ventricular function and visual phase analysis with equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients with Biventricular Device
    European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 2008
    Co-Authors: Africa Muxí, Pilar Paredes, Lluis Mont, Francisco J. Setoain, Joan Duch, Silvia Fuertes, Jaime Ortín, Ernesto Diaz-infante, Francisca Pons

    Abstract:

    Purpose Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is a technique indicated in patients with moderate to severe heart failure and ventricular dyssynchrony. To evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and synchronisation changes after CRT with a Biventricular pacing implant, we used an equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA). Methods Fifty patients were studied. An ERNA was made 72 h and 6 months after the implant. Two acquisitions were performed: with the CRT Device connected and after disconnecting it. In the follow-up, responders were defined as those who had improved in accordance with various clinical variables. Quantitative changes in LVEF and visual changes in synchronisation (phase analysis) were studied comparing the two studies and also comparing the connected and disconnected modes. Results At 6 months, 30 patients were defined as responders. LVEF increased significantly at 6 months compared with the 72-h study only in responders. At 72 h, the number of patients showing a decrease in LVEF ( p  

  • Left ventricular function and visual phase analysis with equilibrium radionuclide angiography in patients with Biventricular Device.
    European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 2008
    Co-Authors: Africa Muxí, Pilar Paredes, Lluis Mont, Joan Duch, Silvia Fuertes, Jaime Ortín, Ernesto Diaz-infante, Setoain Fj, Francisca Pons

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is a technique indicated in patients with moderate to severe heart failure and ventricular dyssynchrony. To evaluate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and synchronisation changes after CRT with a Biventricular pacing implant, we used an equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA).

  • Predictors of Lack of Clinical Improvement at Mid-Term Follow-up With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy
    Revista Espanola De Cardiologia, 2004
    Co-Authors: Ernesto Diaz-infante, Lluis Mont, Antonio Berruezo, Paulo Osorio, Emilio García-morán, Alba Marigliano, Marta Sitges, Manel Azqueta, Carles Paré, Africa Muxí

    Abstract:

    Introduction. About 30% of all patients do not respond to cardiac resynchronization therapy for heart failure. The objective of the study was to analyze the variables that may predict the lack of response. Patients and method. We analyzed the results in a series of 63 patients who received cardiac resynchronization with a Biventricular Device. Clinical and left ventricular function parameters were evaluated at the beginning of the study and at 6 months. Responders were defined as those who were alive, had not received a heart transplant, and who achieved more than a 10% increase in distance in the 6-minute walking test. Results. Mean age was 68.3 (8) years, 51 patients (81%) were men, and NYHA functional class was III-IV in 79.4%. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 22.4% (6)%, QRS width was 177 (25) ms, and 77.8% were in sinus rhythm. Almost half (46%, n=29) had ischemic heart disease. At 6-month follow-up, 69.8% of the patients were responders. Ischemic heart disease, sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and a degree of mitral regurgitation >II/IV before implantation were associated with lack of response. No association was found for any of the other baseline variables. Logistic regression analysis identified all three of the aforementioned variables as independent predictors of lack of response: ischemic heart disease OR=4.8, 95% CI, 1.2-18.3, P=.023; ventricular tachycardia OR=8.7, 95% CI, 1.8-41.3, P=.007; and mitral regurgitation OR=8.03, 95% CI, 1.7-37.1, P=.008. Conclusion. The likelihood of responding to resynchronization therapy is lower in patients with ischemic heart disease, significant mitral regurgitation, or sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. H EART F AILURE

Dusan Z. Kocovic – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy for heart failure
    Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Heather M. Ross, Dusan Z. Kocovic

    Abstract:

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy has been established as important adjuvant therapy in the treatment of severe heart failure. As lead delivery systems have improved and the number of experienced implanters has increased, more patients have access to transvenous left ventricular lead implantation, outside of clinical trials at large medical centers. Ongoing research continues to perfect implantation techniques to optimize patient outcomes, as well as develop hardware and software technology used in implanted Devices. Resynchronization therapy typically results in a decreased burden of emergency room visits and hospitalizations for decompensated heart failure. In addition, diagnostic tools available in resynchronization Devices allow clinicians to not only predict heart failure decompensation and adjust medical therapies accordingly, but they also allow for the diagnosis of asymptomatic arrhythmias that may predict adverse outcomes, as well as allow for the diagnosis of symptomatic arrhythmias without the need for additional costly workup. This suggests that in the long term, Biventricular Device implantation may actually provide cost savings to the health care system. On a macroeconomic scale, there are significant concerns about the cost burden to society of increased implantation of resynchronization therapy Devices, along the same lines as concerns raised regarding the expanding indications for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. As future research broadens indications for implanting implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, as well as resynchronization systems, we may see cardiac resynchronization therapy become a secondary prevention tool yielding long-term patient benefits by postponing or preventing a decline in heart failure status.