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Blowers

The Experts below are selected from a list of 297 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Joseph P. Near – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • What makes whistle-Blowers effective? Three field studies
    Human Relations, 2002
    Co-Authors: Marcia P. Miceli, Joseph P. Near

    Abstract:

    Organization members face difficult choices when they encounter situations which they consider illegitimate, immoral, or unlawful, but lack corrective power. They can ‘blow the whistle’ to authorities, but often, their organizations do not change the objectionable practice. Circumstances under which whistle-Blowers succeed in terminating perceived wrongdoing have not been studied, so this study tests portions of a preliminary model of effectiveness derived from power theories. Results from three field studies show that whistle-Blowers perceive that wrongdoing is more likely to be terminated when: (i) it occurs less frequently, is relatively minor in impact, or has been occurring for a shorter period; and (ii) whistle-Blowers have greater power – reflected in the legitimacy of their roles and the support of others. Implications for research and for would-be whistle-Blowers, their organizations, and policy makers, are discussed.

  • Can Laws Protect Whistle-Blowers?
    Work and Occupations, 1999
    Co-Authors: Marcia P. Miceli, Joseph P. Near, Michael T Rehg, Katherine C Ryan

    Abstract:

    Data collected over three time periods, from 1980 to 1992, show massive changes in the ways in which federal employees reported wrongdoing and the effects on them for having done so. Laws intended to encourage whistle-blowing seem to have two desired effects: to reduce the incidence of perceived wrongdoing and to increase the likelihood of whistle-blowing. However, two unintended effects are also observed: perceived retaliation increased and whistle-Blowers increasingly sought anonymity. The basic model predicting retaliation is essentially the same in the three time periods in which data were collected. Implications for research, practice, and the design of future legislation are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • relationships among value congruence perceived victimization and retaliation against whistle Blowers
    Journal of Management, 1994
    Co-Authors: Marcia P. Miceli, Joseph P. Near

    Abstract:

    Previous research on organizational members who report perceived wrongdoing has been conducted primarily in public sector organizations. The present study examined survey data from directors of internal auditing in a variety of North American organizations. Because retaliation occurred infrequently, data were analyzed with the case-control method, which is relatively unknown in the organizational literature but is frequently used in medical research to examine the occurrence of rare diseases. Managerial retaliation w’as more likely when: (1) the whistle-blower perceived that stopping the wrongdoing would harm the organization; (2) the wrongdoing harmed the organizations climate or culture: (3) the whistle-blower tried unsuccessfully to remain anonymous, when the wrongdoing continued; (4) the wrongdoing harmed the public; and (5) low value congruence existed between whistle-Blowers and their organizations.

Marcia P. Miceli – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • What makes whistle-Blowers effective? Three field studies
    Human Relations, 2002
    Co-Authors: Marcia P. Miceli, Joseph P. Near

    Abstract:

    Organization members face difficult choices when they encounter situations which they consider illegitimate, immoral, or unlawful, but lack corrective power. They can ‘blow the whistle’ to authorities, but often, their organizations do not change the objectionable practice. Circumstances under which whistle-Blowers succeed in terminating perceived wrongdoing have not been studied, so this study tests portions of a preliminary model of effectiveness derived from power theories. Results from three field studies show that whistle-Blowers perceive that wrongdoing is more likely to be terminated when: (i) it occurs less frequently, is relatively minor in impact, or has been occurring for a shorter period; and (ii) whistle-Blowers have greater power – reflected in the legitimacy of their roles and the support of others. Implications for research and for would-be whistle-Blowers, their organizations, and policy makers, are discussed.

  • Can Laws Protect Whistle-Blowers?
    Work and Occupations, 1999
    Co-Authors: Marcia P. Miceli, Joseph P. Near, Michael T Rehg, Katherine C Ryan

    Abstract:

    Data collected over three time periods, from 1980 to 1992, show massive changes in the ways in which federal employees reported wrongdoing and the effects on them for having done so. Laws intended to encourage whistle-blowing seem to have two desired effects: to reduce the incidence of perceived wrongdoing and to increase the likelihood of whistle-blowing. However, two unintended effects are also observed: perceived retaliation increased and whistle-Blowers increasingly sought anonymity. The basic model predicting retaliation is essentially the same in the three time periods in which data were collected. Implications for research, practice, and the design of future legislation are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • relationships among value congruence perceived victimization and retaliation against whistle Blowers
    Journal of Management, 1994
    Co-Authors: Marcia P. Miceli, Joseph P. Near

    Abstract:

    Previous research on organizational members who report perceived wrongdoing has been conducted primarily in public sector organizations. The present study examined survey data from directors of internal auditing in a variety of North American organizations. Because retaliation occurred infrequently, data were analyzed with the case-control method, which is relatively unknown in the organizational literature but is frequently used in medical research to examine the occurrence of rare diseases. Managerial retaliation w’as more likely when: (1) the whistle-blower perceived that stopping the wrongdoing would harm the organization; (2) the wrongdoing harmed the organizations climate or culture: (3) the whistle-blower tried unsuccessfully to remain anonymous, when the wrongdoing continued; (4) the wrongdoing harmed the public; and (5) low value congruence existed between whistle-Blowers and their organizations.

J. McGlynn – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Rabid Fans, Death Threats, and Dysfunctional Stakeholders: The Influence of Organizational and Industry Contexts on Whistle-Blowing Cases
    Management Communication Quarterly, 2011
    Co-Authors: B. K. Richardson, J. McGlynn

    Abstract:

    Organizational wrongdoing is frequently exposed by whistle-Blowers, individuals who disclose unethical behavior to parties they believe can take corrective action. This study aimed to illuminate whistle-Blowers’ experiences with particular attention to how their industry and organizational contexts affected their cases. We analyzed personal accounts of thirteen whistle-Blowers in the collegiate sports industry. Results revealed three themes that significantly affected whistle-blowing accounts: the existence and influence of tightly cou- pled stakeholders, including the athletic governing body and news media; the hypermasculine character of collegiate sports; and the presence of highly identified fans as agents of retaliation. Implications of the study include the recognition and consequences of nonorganizational members as agents of retaliation and the importance of analyzing context when considering whistle- blowing experiences both inside and outside of collegiate sport.